Author Topic: Attachment to Buddha  (Read 1010 times)

Offline Antonio1986

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Attachment to Buddha
« on: September 20, 2015, 10:16:31 pm »
Hello to everyone,
From the time I started studying about Buddha six months ago I noticed that inside begun to grow an obsession about him.
I started to believe that through his teachings I will find a solution to all my problems.
Is attachment to Buddha against Buddhism?
For example I think that Buddhistic monks are totally attached to Buddha. They think of him all day and all night. 
“I hope for nothing. I fear nothing. I am free!"

Offline Nimega

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Re: Attachment to Buddha
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2015, 01:50:29 pm »
Hello!

I started studying Buddhism about two years ago, and decided to be a Buddhist about a year ago, so I don't have much more experience than you. But as I see it, we Buddhists don't see the Buddha's teachings as magic solutions to all of our problems. We rather study them, observe reality to see if it matches what the Buddha said and then, if it actually matches, we incorpore it in our lives. I think that monks don't feel totally attached to the Buddha either: even if they're living in the monastery and living strictly under the Buddhist and monastic rules, they still see the Buddha as a very respected teacher, but as a teacher at the end.

I don't know if my post did really answer your questions. If it didn't, I'm sorry. As I said, I'm kind of new in Buddhism, so I'm not as wise as more experimented users from this site may be.

Good luck with your studying!  :namaste:

Offline Dharmakara

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Re: Attachment to Buddha
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2015, 07:35:54 pm »
From the time I started studying about Buddha six months ago I noticed that inside begun to grow an obsession about him.


I could be wrong, but I suspect that your obsession with the Buddha might in fact just be the latest in a long line of obsessions --- would this be correct?

The reason I ask about this is because obsession is never a good thing, but in fact a serious hindrance, one that requires the practitioner to come to terms with. It should also be noted that the same can be said of attachment.

For example I think that Buddhistic monks are totally attached to Buddha. They think of him all day and all night.


Hmmm... wouldn't that be the very definition of an obsession? Maybe even worse is the fact that you're superimposing your own misunderstanding upon monastics as whole, when I seriously doubt you've even spent any time with Buddhist monastics to come to such a conclusion in the first place. Although I can't speak for all monastics, my focus has always been on the Dharma and the well-being of all living creatures, human or otherwise.

To quote the Buddha:

Atta dipa
Viharatha
Atta sharana
Ananna sharana
Dhamma dipa
Dhamma sharana
Ananna sharana


The above quote is known as the Atta Dipa and it comes from the Mahaparinibbana Sutta, where the Buddha instructed all disciples to place their refuge in the Dhamma, not in others or anything else, that this was the proper way to pay homage to the Buddha, by becoming an island between to two streams, ect.

Truth be told, it would be better if you set aside everything you think you know about Buddhism and start from scratch --- for example, there are many excellent resources provided in the Buddha Basics section of the forum:

http://www.freesangha.com/forums/beginner's-buddhism/

Offline Antonio1986

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Re: Attachment to Buddha
« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2015, 11:15:00 pm »
I have never came across to a Buddhist to be honest. In my country the Chinese we have are millionaires making money laundering by buying property (I don't think that they are Buddhist).
To become Buddhist in USA is not so difficult given that a big part of the business elite are buddhists.
In my country no one is buddhist. 0%.
I just scratch the surface and the surface is pretty interesting.
Buddhism seems a very interesting philosophy.
But even if I don't know many things I suppose I understood one of the basic principle.
If I am wrong correct me. The basic principle is: "Everything in moderation".
Now I started reading the biography and I stopped in the point where after 6 years of hard austerity Buddha received food from a girl (he chose to live) and then he sat under the Bodhi tree. Under the tree based on my limited understanding he fought with both temptations (sent by god Mara) but also he fought with his unawareness. The unawareness deriving also by the ritual practice, which in my personal opinion is not so different today than then (yoga, meditation etc).
Buddha discovered moderation. I don't know whether this is the reason that he become enlightened. But he discovered this.
Denying the word and the materials and living in a monastery I don't think is what he wanted or expected from us. Thinking of him every one minute also I don't think is what he wanted from us.
He wanted from us to live like humans in human societies. He didn't want us to remove attachment, passion, fear, enthusiasm, greed or envy. He knew that this is impossible. He just expected us to try to control all these "negative emotions and behaviors" and not suffer through endless hard training in monasteries or anyone else (don't forget that he renounced renouncers' life of austerity and renouncers renounced him). For example beautiful corrupted women (like Mara's daughters) are around us but this does not mean that we should close ourselfs in monastery's in order to avoid them.
They are here around us and we must learn to control around passions and even forget them for what they are. Buddha's teaching about compassion is the core of his philosophy.
Buddhism is not a dogma (like Christianity or Islam). Buddhism is about individual's truth. And the truth is different for anyone of us. So even Dalai Lama does not have the right to accuse anyone for unawareness.
Buddha never criticized no one and never categorized no one in good or bad. 
So monks have the right to live in monasteries if they feel like this. All others we can live in our sin society fighting with passions and temptations and no one has the right to critisize the other not even indicate what is according Buddha's teaching and what is against Buddha's teaching.
“I hope for nothing. I fear nothing. I am free!"

Offline Dharmakara

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Re: Attachment to Buddha
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2015, 01:06:01 am »
I have never came across to a Buddhist to be honest. In my country the Chinese we have are millionaires making money laundering by buying property (I don't think that they are Buddhist).
To become Buddhist in USA is not so difficult given that a big part of the business elite are buddhists.
In my country no one is buddhist. 0%.


My friend, in the future please examine your words before posting ---  the goal and orientation of this forum is to bring together people of differing backgrounds in an open and friendly environment in keeping with Buddhist ethics and Dharma practice, whereas with your words you have not only discarded the spirit of this forum, but have also disparaged all Chinese practitioners with a single sweep of your hand, when in fact you lack the wisdom and understanding to even make such a statement in the first place

There's certainly quite a few examples of what you have mentioned, such as the Shaolin Temple and other groups, but please don't sit here and paint all Chinese practitioners with a single brush.


Under the tree based on my limited understanding he fought with both temptations (sent by god Mara) but also he fought with his unawareness. The unawareness deriving also by the ritual practice, which in my personal opinion is not so different today than then (yoga, meditation etc).
Buddha discovered moderation. I don't know whether this is the reason that he become enlightened. But he discovered this.

No, the Buddha achieved enlightenment under the Bodhi Tree --- he did not discover it. What he discovered was the cause of suffering and the means by which to bring about an end to that suffering, better known as the Four Noble Truths.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2015, 08:43:19 am by Dharmakara, Reason: grammar »

Offline Amara

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Re: Attachment to Buddha
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2015, 07:51:12 am »
Hi

I would like to refer to Tripitaka to Answer your question with Vakkali Sutta who is attracting on Buddha's Image rather than Buddha's Teaching of Dhamma. Buddha said form(Rupa) is impermanent and thus not to attach.

Please refer to the following verse and read more about that in URL below.

“Enough, Vakkali! Why do you want to see this foul body? One who sees the Dhamma sees me; one who sees me sees the Dhamma. For in seeing the Dhamma, Vakkali, one sees me; and in seeing me, one sees the Dhamma.

“What do you think, Vakkali, is form permanent or impermanent?”— “Impermanent, venerable sir.”…—“Therefore … Seeing thus … He understands: ‘… there is no more for this state of being.’”

Ref: https://suttacentral.net/en/sn22.87

Offline Antonio1986

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Re: Attachment to Buddha
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2015, 10:39:10 am »
I didn't say anything about Chinese in general. 
I just mentioned what the 2,500 Chinese with average value of house $1 mil  do in my poor country.
The population of China is 1,35 billions and of course in this population are included excellent holy and spiritual people and I was priviliged in meeting them when I was studying in England.
I guarantee you Mr. Darmakara that before speak I think very well and suggest these to all the participants of the forum independently of their rank, number of posts or anything else. 
But awareness is not a privilege of specific group of people.
Peasants sometimes are more aware and enlighten by "holy teachers" or "self-called teachers".
Let's not forget that Buddha for a significant period of time was also wandering half-naked as peasant in the cities of India and never claimed supreme knowledge.
“I hope for nothing. I fear nothing. I am free!"

Offline Dharmakara

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Re: Attachment to Buddha
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2015, 01:05:30 pm »
I just mentioned what the 2,500 Chinese with average value of house $1 mil  do in my poor country.


Now you're being disingenuous --- not only did your own government deliberately set the stage for this occur, but you yourself have in fact profited from the economic woes of your poor country by capitalizing on such millionaires, where in one real estate company you're an Associate Partner (October 2014 - Present) and in another you're the Director (August 2012 - Present):

https://cy.linkedin.com/pub/antonis-theofanous/a7/8a6/234

Anyway, it would appear that a short vacation is order, so we'll see you again in a few days.

With metta,

DK

 


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