Author Topic: Buddhism and business  (Read 309 times)

Offline Gincha

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Buddhism and business
« on: June 19, 2017, 01:32:50 am »
Can an Entrepreneur truly be a Buddhist?

Offline Rahul

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Re: Buddhism and business
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2017, 02:55:27 am »
Yes. But why did this question arise in your mind? What is your definition of 'Buddhist'? What makes you doubt if an entrepreneur can be a true Buddhist?

Offline Bradster

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Re: Buddhism and business
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2017, 10:28:33 pm »
Can an Entrepreneur truly be a Buddhist?

Before I comment know that I’ve only started practicing Buddhism for a month and do not speak from any kind of experience.

However, I think I may be able to identify or at least relate to why you asked the question.  Is it more common for a business owner with employees to be aggressive and what you may feel is disrespectful or supportive and understanding?
Everyone will have a different answer based on their experience.   I managed twenty-two people for about eight years with a decent turn around so new people and experiences to draw from all the time. When I first started management I did it by force. I was aggressive, stern and didn’t have time for what reasons one had for lack of performance.  The reason for this is I lacked experienced and the only tool I had was a hammer.

A couple years later with experience I learned there are far more effective tools than a hammer. My management style became the complete opposite. Those that worked for me respected me and I them. We looked out for one another.  If someone did wrong, or something pretty inappropriate like snap on a customer.  I understood why they did it, it was a hard job and it’s something all of us inside would love to do at times.  I reviewed the good work they had done and also, I communicated that I know why they did it and what drove them to it. 

They know what they did was wrong, you can read it all over them. Things like that can happen to the best of us. I would end it with, I enjoy working with them and would like to continue to do so, but if it happens in the future it’s now me that’s in the line of fire.  Do you think you have learned from this and things should be ok moving forward?

Never once had a repeat occurrence or any issues moving forward. I respected them and looked out for them, they know what position it puts me in if it happens again and they did the same for me.
The moral of the story it’s all based on experience and how you want to go about it.  Entrepreneurship is leadership. The quality of it comes from experience and the way you want to go about it.  I personally found it more effective in a business standpoint to be more Zen about it in the long run from my experience.

Hope that was helpful.

Edit:

People’s opinion will very on this but let’s say you visit two lawyers to review your case.

Lawyer one, shows you every possible position that could be used for your case. Most are long shots but given your situation you are drawn to it and compelled to push forward and hold on to hope. You could sink thousands of dollars holding out for hope.

Lawyer Two: Is down to earth and tells you how it is.  Look there are ways we could go about this, but ultimately in this situation this is how it’s going to play out. 

Which one is more painful?  Who’s right? The answer is within you.  You have to carry that with you for a while. The way you want to go about it that allows you to sleep at night and know you did the right thing is the answer.  From the lawyers point of view, both are trying to provide you the best service on what they think you need to hear.

« Last Edit: July 11, 2017, 10:43:44 pm by Bradster »

Offline The Artis Magistra

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Re: Buddhism and business
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2017, 08:06:15 pm »
Can an Entrepreneur truly be a Buddhist?

If they were to accomplish such a task, they might be called a Buddhist Entrepreneur.

Offline VisuddhiRaptor

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Re: Buddhism and business
« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2017, 02:21:03 am »
Can an Entrepreneur truly be a Buddhist?

The foundation of the Buddhist way of life is non-harming therefore if a business does not trade in harming things, it is OK in Buddhism.

This link lists the Buddhist view on the wrong types of business:

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/ptf/dhamma/sacca/sacca4/samma-ajivo/index.html

This link advises Buddhist business people to spend 1/4 of their income, save 1/4 of their income and reinvest 1/2 of their income into their business:

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/dn/dn.31.0.nara.html

Buddhism is business friendly but only business that does not harm.  :namaste:

Offline The Artis Magistra

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Re: Buddhism and business
« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2017, 10:22:11 pm »
Can you list out without needing to go to links (some difficulties with my browser), some ideas or clues about what are considered harmful and non-harmful and what you would think are generally or in a little more detail alright for a Buddhist and not really good? I guess making clothing is an example of a not trade in harming things, and making gun is selling a device which can potentially harm people, is designed for that purpose, even if one doesn't end up firing it and uses it just as a defense, just as one might use in defense some article of clothing or use an article of clothing to strangle a person or uses clothing to defend from the elements?

Offline Patipada

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Re: Buddhism and business
« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2017, 12:39:51 pm »
I think a Buddhist can be an Entrepreneur. I'm an entrepreneur myself. I'm not 100% a Buddhist but I try to live more and more according the Buddhist philosophy and try to follow the Buddhist precepts.
It's all about intention and looking deeply into what drives you as an entrepreneur.
My believe is that it's possible to do business from the hearth and in a wise way (wise in the Buddhist sense of the word).
The opposite (but what's more common) is the drive for doing business from desire and hatred.

Offline The Artis Magistra

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Re: Buddhism and business
« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2017, 12:59:50 pm »
I think a Buddhist can be an Entrepreneur. I'm an entrepreneur myself. I'm not 100% a Buddhist but I try to live more and more according the Buddhist philosophy and try to follow the Buddhist precepts.
It's all about intention and looking deeply into what drives you as an entrepreneur.
My believe is that it's possible to do business from the hearth and in a wise way (wise in the Buddhist sense of the word).
The opposite (but what's more common) is the drive for doing business from desire and hatred.

What would being a 100 percent Buddhist be described as or need to be in your idea or definition? I'd like to know what such would look like and do and believe and perform in detail.

Offline Patipada

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Re: Buddhism and business
« Reply #8 on: August 07, 2017, 12:26:17 am »
Haha, yes it's not possible to catch that. You cannot be anything right? Not any concept ;-)
But what I ment, from the relative perspective, is that I don't 'feel' like an 100% Buddhist.

Offline ground

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Re: Buddhism and business
« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2017, 12:38:02 am »
... I don't 'feel' like an 100% Buddhist.

Being a buddhist or feeling as buddhist is no worth in itself. Only benefits derived from buddhism are worthwhile.

Offline Samana Johann

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Re: Buddhism and business
« Reply #10 on: August 07, 2017, 01:32:46 am »
... I don't 'feel' like an 100% Buddhist.


Being a buddhist or feeling as buddhist is no worth in itself. Only benefits derived from buddhism are worthwhile.

Going after Buddhism or feeling as going after Buddhism is no worth in itself. Only benefits derived from Dhamma-Vinaya of the Buddha, at least the Noble Eightfold path, are worthwhile.

Behind all other is just bussiness and trade for the rounds in the world.

Spoken of "real Buddhist", such is only complet with the perfection of virtue, e.g. livelihood, e.g. having adopted the holly life. Other livelihoods may allow good way to go.

The Buddha did not speak much about livelihood issues to lay people, since it is for the most hard to chance it. But he counted five involvements in trades as naturally very problematic for prosperity in direction path: trade with weapons, poision, meet, living beings and indoxicants. Why? Because one makes mental unskillful kamma in approval (not to speak of support) of unskillful deeds.

One should, if liking much possible benefit in Dhamma, keep in mind that Silas are "just" an outwardly set of training against the raw defilements. Kamma, how ever, is made in three ways, by mind (joy, approving, thinking), speech (incl. all kind of expressions, also bodily, writting...) and by the body (e.g. by one self, direct or indirect, e.g. via machine or tool).

It's for sure not easy to walk this way and one needs the nissaya, especially today where its not easy to find straight trade partner. Having been successful with serial companies by my self before leaving the home into homelessness, putting trade for gain in the world aside.

That a real devoted an blessed businessman can grasp after path and fruits shown this story well:

Quote
Anathapindika: The Great Benefactor, by Hellmuth Hecker (2005; 23pp./68KB)
A biography in the BPS's "Lives of the Disciples" series. Anathapindika was one of the Buddha's chief lay disciples and a generous patron of the monastic Sangha. A wealthy householder, Anathapindika discovered an even richer inner treasure when he attained stream-entry during his first encounter with the Buddha. He lived out his life freely sharing both kinds of wealth: he provided the Buddha and countless other monks with food and shelter, and he taught Dhamma to others. Drawing on passages from the suttas, this engaging biography tells the story of an exemplary lay Buddhist.


One maybe similar person of our near past days was Mr. Goenka, althought he already left the whole refuge and the original way.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2017, 01:59:20 am by Samana Johann »
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