Author Topic: buddhists and conventional law  (Read 1386 times)

Offline MarasAndBuddhas

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buddhists and conventional law
« on: November 11, 2019, 08:06:26 am »
I just felt like this would be a reasonable topic to bring up on this forum because buddhists have a(?) very strict code of behavior and ethics. Sometimes it contradicts other codes of behavior and ethics.

So, the other day I got pulled over when I was driving because my registration had expired over the summer. I was, for whatever reason, convinced that it was still good until the next calendar year. So because this whole thing caught me by surprise, I was full of anxiety and a little anger. I ended up pouring myself a little bit of whisky and calling my brother. Me and my brother are both kind of argumentative, the point he was saying that irritated me was that it wasn't the cops "fault" that he screwed with my day like that, and i just calmly said "well, fallowing that logic, nothing is really anybody's fault. If an angry person beats someone of the head with a baseball bat..." and at one point i just told him the conversation wasn't helping me anymore, and he refused to just let me off the phone so i hung up. After I got off the phone, i realized i still wasn't really in control of my mind, so i drank some more whisky and meditated for an hour and am now grateful that the situation occurred so that i can keep better control of my behaviors and actions in the future.

Do any of you buddhists have anything to add to the perceptions expressed here? Just thought i would add to the conversations...

Offline Chaz

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Re: buddhists and conventional law
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2019, 06:12:00 pm »
I just felt like this would be a reasonable topic to bring up on this forum because buddhists have a(?) very strict code of behavior and ethics. Sometimes it contradicts other codes of behavior and ethics.

So, the other day I got pulled over when I was driving because my registration had expired over the summer. I was, for whatever reason, convinced that it was still good until the next calendar year. So because this whole thing caught me by surprise, I was full of anxiety and a little anger. I ended up pouring myself a little bit of whisky and calling my brother. Me and my brother are both kind of argumentative, the point he was saying that irritated me was that it wasn't the cops "fault" that he screwed with my day like that, and i just calmly said "well, fallowing that logic, nothing is really anybody's fault. If an angry person beats someone of the head with a baseball bat..." and at one point i just told him the conversation wasn't helping me anymore, and he refused to just let me off the phone so i hung up. After I got off the phone, i realized i still wasn't really in control of my mind, so i drank some more whisky and meditated for an hour and am now grateful that the situation occurred so that i can keep better control of my behaviors and actions in the future.

Do any of you buddhists have anything to add to the perceptions expressed here? Just thought i would add to the conversations...

I could, I guess, but I'm not sure about directions.  You're kind of all over the map - stict codes, behavior and ethics,  getting busted, pissed off at your brother, self medication, medication and self-realization.

I could always add to the perceptions - mild anxiety over meeting a new sangha on Sunday ;D

One thing.....seriously ..... my feeling is that experiences with getting angry aren't opportunities to exert some sort of control over the emotion.    What it does give us is an opportunity learn how and when to let go of that emotion.  With practice we reduce the clinging to emotional outbursts.  Given enough time our practice can expose the emotion before it even arises.

You don't need whiskey to do this, but don't let whiskey stop you.

Offline stillpointdancer

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Re: buddhists and conventional law
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2019, 04:46:28 am »
When stuff like that happens and you give your anger it's head, reviewing later, as you did, is a great step forwards towards modifying the anger when it arises. We all make mistakes, but the difference between people seeking to change themselves rather than the world is that we can't change the world, but we can change how we react to it. The good news is the the right meditations and practice gradually sees these episodes decreasing, without having to keep the tight control we do now. We change by working on the gap between the feelings arising and how we react to those feelings. Long term we might even find the feelings not arising so much.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Offline stevie

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Re: buddhists and conventional law
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2019, 06:15:00 am »
Do any of you buddhists have anything to add to the perceptions expressed here?

Analysis tends to affirm it's own fabrications but ignoring the lesson/teaching entails perpetuation.

 :anjali:

 


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