Author Topic: Daily Practice  (Read 691 times)

Offline Mcarter

  • Member
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
Daily Practice
« on: January 08, 2017, 02:23:38 pm »
How do you start a daily practice?  I don't wanna just read and study daily but put what I learn into practice. 

Offline zafrogzen

  • Member
  • Posts: 278
  • I've been practicing and studying meditation since
    • View Profile
    • zafrogzen
Re: Daily Practice
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2017, 05:52:51 pm »
Here's some basics with a Zen slant.

http://www.frogzen.com/meditation-basics/
My first formal meditation training was with Shunryu Suzuki in the 60's and later with Kobun, Robert Aitken and many other teachers (mainly zen). However, I've spent the most time practicing on my own, which is all I do now. I'm living in a rather isolated area so I miss connecting with other practitioners. Despite my interest in zen I've made an effort to remain secular. You can visit my website at http://www.frogzen.com

Offline Ron-the-Elder

  • Member
  • Posts: 4475
  • May all beings live rightly and harmoniously.
    • View Profile
Re: Daily Practice
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2017, 04:59:55 pm »
My suggestion is to study, apply what you learn in your daily life and reflect upon what you experience.  If the result is beneficial:  stick with it.  If the result is painful or causes you or someone else harm, then try something different, which you think will improve things.  Meditate when you have an opportunity and observe how your mind works.

This should give you a good start.   :hug:
What Makes an Elder? :
A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

Offline HexBasedReality

  • Member
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: Daily Practice
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2017, 07:20:12 pm »
I, too, have just started and it seems to me a lot of things I already do have been sort of meditative.

Three times a week I go to the gym (solo) and lift weights and focus on this activity itself. Everyday I walk and clear my mind to and from work (one mile each way).

These things seem to have always helped me gain some clarity, before I found Buddhism.

Has anyone else "fallen" into meditating this way? I want to start meditating for real, but need to read more before I start. I have begun examining my own thoughts through the day as well which is immensely helpful in an office situation.

Offline stillpointdancer

  • Enlightenment through insight
  • Member
  • Posts: 349
  • Dancing at the Still Point describes my meditation
    • View Profile
    • Enlightenment for Grown Ups
Re: Daily Practice
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2017, 03:36:41 am »
At your stage, I think the only thing I would add is that the first stages of meditation mirror what you are doing to your body in the gym, in this case focusing on training the mind to gain a measure of control and skill when it comes to dealing with thoughts. You don't need to clear the mind in meditation, but to develop the ability to get it to do what you want, rather than what it wants by, say, focusing on the breath.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Offline zafrogzen

  • Member
  • Posts: 278
  • I've been practicing and studying meditation since
    • View Profile
    • zafrogzen
Re: Daily Practice
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2017, 10:09:04 am »
Hi Hex,

It sounds like you have already started meditation practice. Sitting meditation is just an intensification of that.

I also lift weights and find the activity very meditative. If you start practicing formal sitting meditation I think you'll find it brings out that aspect of it even more. When I lift weights I watch my breath as I would in meditation. For instance if I'm bench pressing, I breath out on the lift up and breath in when I bring the weight down

I frequently use the word "who?" as in "who is lifting this, who am I?" silently said on whichever is the longer, most relaxing breath. That "turns the mind around" and can lead to deeper insights -- right there in the gym.

In hatha yoga the breath is usually taken in when bending back and out when bending forward. It's sort of intuitive and common sense. You might already be using your breath that way. Meditation will make it even more effective.

I also find the treadmill very meditative -- http://www.frogzen.com/uncategorized/walking-mirror-samadhi/

When I started sitting longer retreats with a zen teacher in a formal group setting it really gave my practice a boost. You can't usually realize on your own what is physically possible until you're pushed a bit.
My first formal meditation training was with Shunryu Suzuki in the 60's and later with Kobun, Robert Aitken and many other teachers (mainly zen). However, I've spent the most time practicing on my own, which is all I do now. I'm living in a rather isolated area so I miss connecting with other practitioners. Despite my interest in zen I've made an effort to remain secular. You can visit my website at http://www.frogzen.com

Offline HexBasedReality

  • Member
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: Daily Practice
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2017, 02:51:08 pm »
Hi Hex,

It sounds like you have already started meditation practice. Sitting meditation is just an intensification of that.

I also lift weights and find the activity very meditative. If you start practicing formal sitting meditation I think you'll find it brings out that aspect of it even more. When I lift weights I watch my breath as I would in meditation. For instance if I'm bench pressing, I breath out on the lift up and breath in when I bring the weight down

I frequently use the word "who?" as in "who is lifting this, who am I?" silently said on whichever is the longer, most relaxing breath. That "turns the mind around" and can lead to deeper insights -- right there in the gym.

In hatha yoga the breath is usually taken in when bending back and out when bending forward. It's sort of intuitive and common sense. You might already be using your breath that way. Meditation will make it even more effective.

I also find the treadmill very meditative -- http://www.frogzen.com/uncategorized/walking-mirror-samadhi/

When I started sitting longer retreats with a zen teacher in a formal group setting it really gave my practice a boost. You can't usually realize on your own what is physically possible until you're pushed a bit.


Thanks for this, I will keep this in mind. I do watch my breathing as I lift due to the valsalva maneuver if you've heard of it.

http://www.kingofthegym.com/valsalva-maneuver/

Offline stillpointdancer

  • Enlightenment through insight
  • Member
  • Posts: 349
  • Dancing at the Still Point describes my meditation
    • View Profile
    • Enlightenment for Grown Ups
Re: Daily Practice
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2017, 03:34:44 am »
Now you mention it, I used to do something similar while swimming at lunchtimes, watching the breath while bringing elements of practice to the activity.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Offline BlackLooter

  • Serious Cue!
  • Member
  • Posts: 25
  • Deliver me unto Jesus..and then make me a Buddha!
    • View Profile
Re: Daily Practice
« Reply #8 on: April 12, 2017, 07:59:44 pm »
Well I've coined a term and activity called Meditation on the go..

So like you go about your day..and when you have thoughts about meditation..you begin..and do it as much as you can..and then move on to the next topic or item on your list of things to do during the day..

So if you add up all the times you thought of meditation and did it..you might be able to come up with almost 20 minutes of just random meditating through out the day..

This can build focus and attention and concentration..>Which are the ground seeds of a formal sitting meditation for example..
All the Girls and Spacemen will have a monkey on my back before I Attack, I do Shaolin, and Wing From Gui..the meaning of life is backwards and so are you!

 


SimplePortal 2.3.3 © 2008-2010, SimplePortal