Author Topic: Dhammika - The duties of virtuose lay disciple of the Buddha ("Buddhist")  (Read 199 times)

Offline Samana Johann

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Thought it might be not so known, especially fot those not having come in contact with the good teachings, here the advices of the Buddha in regard of the main practice for lay disciples (Buddhists) as support and good field to train:

Quote
From the Dhammika Sutta

- Namo tassa bhagavato arahato sammā-sambuddhassa -

"Now I will tell you the layman's duty. Following it a lay-disciple would be virtuous; for it is not possible for one occupied with the household life to realize the complete bhikkhu practice (dhamma).

"He should not kill a living being, nor cause it to be killed, nor should he incite another to kill. Do not injure any being, either strong or weak, in the world.

"A disciple should avoid taking anything from anywhere knowing it (to belong to another). He should not steal nor incite another to steal. He should completely avoid theft.

"A wise man should avoid unchastity as (he would avoid falling into) a pit of glowing charcoal. If unable to lead a celibate life, he should not go to another's wife.

"Having entered a royal court or a company of people he should not speak lies. He should not speak lies (himself) nor incite others to do so. He should completely avoid falsehood.

"A layman who has chosen to practice this Dhamma should not indulge in the drinking of intoxicants. He should not drink them nor encourage others to do so; realizing that it leads to madness. Through intoxication foolish people perform evil deeds and cause other heedless people to do likewise. He should avoid intoxication, this occasion for demerit, which stupefies the mind, and is the pleasure of foolish people.


Do not kill a living being;
do not take what is not given;
do not speak a lie;
do not drink intoxicants;
abstain from sexual intercourse;
do not eat food at night, at the wrong time;
do not wear flower-garlands nor use perfumes;
use the ground as a bed or sleep on a mat.

"This is called the eight-factored observance made known by the Awakened One who has reached the end of suffering.

"With a gladdened mind observe the observance day (uposatha), complete with its eight factors, on the fourteenth, fifteenth and eighth days of the (lunar) fortnight and also the special holiday of the half month. In the morning, with a pure heart and a joyful mind, a wise man, after observing the uposatha, should distribute suitable food and drink to the community of bhikkhus. He should support his mother and father as his duty and engage in lawful trading. A layman who carries this out diligently goes to the devas called "Self-radiant."

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Offline The Artis Magistra

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In the same manner that you neatly listed these rules along with their basis or reference, can you also list the rules of the monk, and whatever else, what might be beyond that? Furthermore, can you also list the rules of what makes a "bad man" or an "evil doer" who earns trouble and worse? In their degrees, can you place the rules all together, in an order of the best and most likely to achieve and the worst and most likely to not succeed?

I enjoy these sorts of things and learn from them.

I think there is likely enough material to write lists of the people said to be going to hells or bad experiences all the way to people said to be going to heavens and good experiences and those who go beyond the Deva realms and beyond the cyclical and troubling entirely, and what each of them are to do and the basis of those simple tips.

Offline Samana Johann

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Nyom can read the duties for monks in this Sutta, following the link. For more on rules for Monks, he can study some years, maybe starting here.

The relation duties to be best protected fo householders can be found in the Sigalovada Sutta: The Discourse to Sigala

Here in regard the relation duties between householder and in reaction monks and preacher:

Quote
"In five ways, young householder, should a householder minister to ascetics and brahmans as the Zenith:

(i) by lovable deeds,
(ii) by lovable words,
(iii) by lovable thoughts,
(iv) by keeping open house to them,
(v) by supplying their material needs.

"The ascetics and brahmans thus ministered to as the Zenith by a householder show their compassion towards him in six ways:

(i) they restrain him from evil,
(ii) they persuade him to do good,
(iii) they love him with a kind heart,
(iv) they make him hear what he has not heard,
(v) they clarify what he has already heard,
(vi) they point out the path to a heavenly state.


It's worthy and importand to know, against broad believe, that monks have absolutly no duty to teach lay people, but is (if not corrupt, e.g. for reward, livelihood, to gain supporter, fame, praise, power...) always 100% compassion, free will and given free, by heart and dependend of once ability and joy with it.

In regard of Kamma, the best start is the MN 135: Cula-kammavibhanga Sutta — The Shorter Analysis of Action.

Then Subha the student, Todeyya's son, went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, exchanged courteous greetings with him. After an exchange of friendly greetings & courtesies, he sat to one side. As he was sitting there, he said to the Blessed One: "Master Gotama, what is the reason, what is the cause, why baseness & excellence are seen among human beings, among the human race? For short-lived & long-lived people are to be seen, sickly & healthy, ugly & beautiful, uninfluential & influential, poor & rich, low-born & high-born, stupid & discerning people are to be seen. So what is the reason, what is the cause, why baseness & excellence are seen among human beings, among the human race?"...

A well prepared overview of the realms and destinations of beings, incl. the causes of being reborne there can be found in The Thirty-one Planes of Existence.

Its good to understand that cause and effect does not care about status, birth, clothes... but the basic contucts,following an unwholesome or wholesame mind are the origins of fruits.

Seeing or having faith in that, the basic of Buddhas teaching, one if discerning understands quick why a human existence is so seldom and preciouse, not to speak of meeting the good Dhamma. One can also count how less now "blessed" people can expect to hold their gained "wealth". It's not easy not to fall down, if not starting serious keeping the four or five basic precepts, and for one liking to gain path and fruits, eight precepts are most nessesary to stick to.

Much joy and insight exploring the Dhamma, may it be of help and use for all able to take the gift and to develope faith and wisdom.
« Last Edit: August 13, 2017, 06:32:02 am by Samana Johann »
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Offline Samana Johann

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Quote
Mahanama Sutta: Being a Lay Buddhist

- Namo tassa bhagavato arahato sammā-sambuddhassa -

Once the Blessed One was dwelling among the Sakyas in Nigrodha Park at Kapilavatthu. There, Mahanama the Sakyan approached the Blessed One. Having approached and paid respect to the Blessed One, he sat aside. Then, seated aside, Mahanama the Sakyan said thus to the Blessed One:

"Venerable sir, in what way is one a lay follower?"[1]

"Mahanama, inasmuch as one has gone to the Buddha for refuge, has gone to the Dhamma for refuge, has gone to the Sangha for refuge; in that way, Mahanama, one is a lay follower."

"Then, venerable sir, in what way is a lay follower virtuous?"

"Mahanama, inasmuch as a lay follower abstains from destroying living beings; abstains from taking what is not given; abstains from sexual misconduct; abstains from lying; and abstains from wine, liquor and intoxicants that are causes for heedlessness; in that way, Mahanama, a lay follower is virtuous."

"Then, venerable sir, in what way is a lay follower engaged in his own welfare, but not in others' welfare?"

"Mahanama, inasmuch as a lay follower is possessed of faith himself, but rouses not others to possess faith; is possessed of virtue himself, but rouses not others to possess virtue; is possessed of liberality himself, but rouses not others to possess liberality; is himself desirous of meeting with monks, but rouses not others to meet with monks; is himself desirous of hearing the true Dhamma, but rouses not others to hear the true Dhamma; is himself habitually mindful of the Dhamma that is heard, but rouses not others to be mindful of the Dhamma; has himself ascertained the meaning/benefit of the Dhamma that is heard, but rouses not others to ascertain the meaning/benefit; having known the meaning/benefit, having known the Dhamma, is himself committed to the practice according to the Dhamma, but rouses not others to be committed to the practice according to the Dhamma; in that way, Mahanama, a lay follower is engaged in his own welfare, but not in others' welfare."

"Then, venerable sir, in what way is a lay follower engaged in his own welfare and in others' welfare?"

"Mahanama, inasmuch as a lay follower is possessed of faith himself, and rouses others to possess faith; is possessed of virtue himself, and rouses others to possess virtue; is possessed of liberality himself, and rouses others to possess liberality; is himself desirous of meeting with monks, and rouses others to meet with monks; is himself desirous of hearing the true Dhamma, and rouses others to hear the true Dhamma; is himself habitually mindful of the Dhamma that is heard, and rouses others to be mindful of the Dhamma; is himself ascertained of the meaning/benefit of the Dhamma that is heard, and rouses others to ascertain the meaning/benefit; having known the meaning/benefit, having known the Dhamma, is himself committed to the practice according to the Dhamma, and rouses others to be committed to the practice according to the Dhamma; in that way, Mahanama, a lay follower is engaged in his own welfare and in others' welfare."

Notes

1.Pali: upasaka.
« Last Edit: August 13, 2017, 06:19:32 am by Samana Johann »
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