Author Topic: How can Buddhism help with work issues?  (Read 994 times)

Offline Flowergirl36

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How can Buddhism help with work issues?
« on: August 15, 2015, 02:36:41 pm »
I'm a new Buddhist and a year ago had a really bad bipolar episode which included 6 hospitalizations. I've made a recovery but still have a ways to go. I recently went back to work after a years absence and it's been rough. I'm not performing well, I'm nervous and anxious, my focus is not there. Instead of quitting I'd really like to push through this and want to know how Buddhism can help me with these issues. Any guiding principles or philosophies? I'm fighting to get my life back. I have to admit as a former all star athlete everything came easy to me but now I'm in a predicament where I'll have to work hard to regain something. Any Buddhist principles on that would be great too as well as the best place to start to start allowing Buddhism to positively influence my life. Thank you.

Offline popsthebuilder

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Re: How can Buddhism help with work issues?
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2015, 06:50:09 am »
Introspection and honesty to self is key. Find peace in yourself and the outside will be less of a burden. Pushing through is key as giving up or giving in is self destructive and kin to disregard for your potential. Have faith in yourself and your own truths. Thanks.

Faith in selfless Unity through Good


Offline popsthebuilder

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Re: How can Buddhism help with work issues?
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2015, 06:50:45 am »
I guess I am NOT technically Buddhist so perhaps my advice isn't the advice you want. Good luck.

Faith in selfless Unity through Good


Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: How can Buddhism help with work issues?
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2015, 02:45:24 pm »
Hi, Flowergirl.

Regarding your statement and question: 
Quote
I'm nervous and anxious, my focus is not there. Instead of quitting I'd really like to push through this and want to know how Buddhism can help me with these issues.


One of the reasons for the practice of meditation and mindfulness is to learn the way your particular mind works.  The mental states that you have observed:  "nervousness and anxiousness", or "angst" are mental states and have a cause as all states of suffering have a cause.  You hint as to the cause, in that you say that you want to keep your job, which indicates an attachment to it and recognition that you fear losing your job , because of your mental states affecting either the quantity or quality of your work.  Do I understand you correctly?

If so, then my suggestion to you is to simply observe these feelings and let them go.  So long as you focus your attention on them and magnify them in your mind, they will get larger.  If you just observe them, and let them pass, then you will discover that they will become smaller and then eventually pass away.

This was Buddha's teaching in the second of The Four Noble Truths:  Suffering has a cause "attachment", "clinging", "craving", "fixation" on that which is impermanent and will inevitably pass away, decompose, corrupt, fade, die, move on, wane, or any other word which you can think of which means, that it will end, or change.  Our thoughts are temporary and will eventually fade from our minds.  The same is true for all mental factors, including thoughts, feelings, emotions, ideas, inspirations, anxiety, angst, fear, frustration, love, hate, rage, sadness, longing, and any other mental factor you can imagine.

Meditation allows us to see this as we sit in silence, just observing  our breathing, or listening to our heart's beat.  Practice meditation as often as you can and you will see what I mean.  Here are some readings that will help you to learn more about meditation:

Basic Breath Meditation:  http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/thanissaro/breathmed.html
What Makes an Elder? :
A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

Offline Amara

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Re: How can Buddhism help with work issues?
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2015, 07:55:49 pm »
Hi Flowergirl36

There was a lady nun called "Paṭācārā" who was in a stage of (uncontrollable) mental suffering. She was running around on the street of city without clothings until she received the teaching of Dhamma from Buddha.

You can read about her here

http://www.ancient-buddhist-texts.net/English-Texts/Foremost-Elder-Nuns/04-Patacara.htm
http://www.ancient-buddhist-texts.net/English-Texts/Buddhist-Legends/08-12.htm

In order to help with Focus (concentration), I would like to suggest on doing Loving Kindness whenever you can't concentrate. It's just simple as saying a word in your mind "may you be free from suffering".

You can read more about doing Loving Kindness Chanting here

http://www.wildmind.org/metta/special-lovingkindness-meditations/lovingkindness-chant
http://www.buddhanet.net/chant-metta.htm
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5JAVk3Qwi8

Another way is to chant a word "Budhha" and imagine that "Buddha" is appearing in your mind. You can do this whenever you are losing focus.

Also do the taking of Five Precepts and refrain from breaking.

The five precepts are not given in the form of commands, but are training guidelines to help one live a life in which one is happy, without worries, and able to meditate well. Breaking one's sīla as pertains to sexual conduct introduces harmfulness towards one's practice or the practice of another person if it involves uncommitted relationship. They are

I undertake the training rule to abstain from killing ;
I undertake the training rule to abstain from taking what is not given;
I undertake the training rule to abstain from sensual misconduct;
I undertake the training rule to abstain from false speech; and
I undertake the training rule to abstain from liquors, wines, and other intoxicants, which are the basis for heedlessness.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C5%9A%C4%ABla#Five_Precepts

 


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