Author Topic: How to pick a tradition  (Read 501 times)

Offline Heatherkm

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How to pick a tradition
« on: October 14, 2016, 10:29:25 pm »
I started studying and practicing Buddhism about five months ago. Luckily I have a dharma center fairly close to where I live. They offer a small variety of different sanghas and traditions.
Through research and studying, I've learned that it's best to pick a tradition and stick with it.
So far, I've been to a Soto zen retreat at a monestary here in California as well as a retreat based on the Thick Nan Hahn tradition of Buddhism.
I know that there are more schools such as Tibetan, though I don't have much experience with those.
While I appreciate and am interested in all the traditions I've encountered so far, I'm not sure any one of them has "spoken" to me. Am I expecting too much? How do I choose what to go with?
Thanks
Heather

Offline Amorphos

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Re: How to pick a tradition
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2016, 05:52:56 am »
My opinion - I wouldn’t worry about picking a tradition or splitting things up in this way. I would be focused on developing a deep understanding of Buddha Dhamma first.  Do you have a full understanding of the Eight-fold path? Do you follow Sila and the Eight-fold path every day, every moment? How is that going for you?
« Last Edit: October 15, 2016, 05:56:44 am by Amorphos »
Uddhumataka – Vinilaka – Vipubbaka – Vicchiddaka – Vikkhayitaka –
Vikkhittaka – Hata-vikkhittaka – Lohitaka – Pulavaka – Atthika

Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: How to pick a tradition
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2016, 01:09:24 pm »
Quote


Can't believe I have been spellling Venerable Hahn's name wrong since 1963  (53 years).  :smack:  Thanks for sharing your study experience.   :jinsyx:

As for picking a tradition.  My method was to try as many of them as I could stand, and then stay where I felt most comfortable and seemed to progress the most.
What Makes an Elder? :
A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

Offline stillpointdancer

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Re: How to pick a tradition
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2016, 03:11:20 am »
My advice would be to spend some time trying out some more tradition-free meditation and mindfulness practices, read around what is important about the path, and then decide. Any tradition is just a raft anyway, to be discarded when you become a stream entrant- unless you decide you want to live within that tradition.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: How to pick a tradition
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2016, 06:27:48 am »
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stillpointdancer:  "Any tradition is just a raft anyway, to be discarded when you become a stream entrant- unless you decide you want to live within that tradition."




TIGRIS-a-yana


Not a bad analogy, stillpoint.  Well said!
What Makes an Elder? :
A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

 


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