Author Topic: Meditation Posture  (Read 974 times)

Offline VesicaP23

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Meditation Posture
« on: February 01, 2016, 01:56:28 am »
I have been mediitating daily for about six months. I began in a sitting posture using a chair for the first couple of months before switching to a cushion. once I started using the cushion it took me a few days to get a comfortable posture but now after a couple more months I am finding it increasingly difficult to find a position I can sit in for the duration of my sit. As the various muscles and parts of the body relax and certain tensions unwind I find myself in a totally different position to the one I started in, which in turn feels like a disruption to the meditation. I am aware this may just be a phase but I wondered if anyone has experienced this and had any suggestions, tips or maybe just some encouragement! Thank you. Peace.

Offline Lobster

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Re: Meditation Posture
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2016, 03:10:22 am »
Sit on a chair as soon as difficulties arise. There is nothing magical about sitting on a cushion.


Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: Meditation Posture
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2016, 05:12:45 am »
I have been mediitating daily for about six months. I began in a sitting posture using a chair for the first couple of months before switching to a cushion. once I started using the cushion it took me a few days to get a comfortable posture but now after a couple more months I am finding it increasingly difficult to find a position I can sit in for the duration of my sit. As the various muscles and parts of the body relax and certain tensions unwind I find myself in a totally different position to the one I started in, which in turn feels like a disruption to the meditation. I am aware this may just be a phase but I wondered if anyone has experienced this and had any suggestions, tips or maybe just some encouragement! Thank you. Peace.

Experiment and find a position that is basically comfortable for you.  Chairs are fine, stools are fine, laying down is fine, whatever works.
Meditation is about exploring and developing the mind, there is no need to suffer or do yogic contortions.

Offline VesicaP23

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Re: Meditation Posture
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2016, 02:55:36 am »
Thank you.

Offline nirmal

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Re: Meditation Posture
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2016, 11:36:46 am »
I had the same problems.Then I made this seat.I'm still using them till today.

Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: Meditation Posture
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2016, 04:23:53 pm »
I had the same problems.Then I made this seat.I'm still using them till today.

Quote
Spiny:  "Experiment and find a position that is basically comfortable for you.  Chairs are fine, stools are fine, laying down is fine, whatever works.
Meditation is about exploring and developing the mind, there is no need to suffer or do yogic contortions."

Strongly suggest you do what Spiny advises.  "comfort" and "stability" are the best for long duration meditation.  Also take the opportunity to meditate or practice mindfulness while standing in lines, waiting at traffic lights, and while taking strolls in the park or in the woodlands.
What Makes an Elder? :
A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

Offline zafrogzen

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Re: Meditation Posture
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2016, 04:48:59 pm »
You say a "cushion." A meditation cushion, or zafu?

I don't understand how you can change positions without noticing it -- if you're awake.  It sounds like the position you end up in is relaxed, so maybe you should start out that way. But I don't even know what you mean by "position.".

In my experience, unless you have a physical disability, it's possible to gradually, in a year or less, to be able to sit in the quarter or half lotus, but the only way to do that is to sit that way and gradually prolong the period. If you can get into it for even a minute or two, you should be able to extend the time until you can sit that way for up to half an hour.  It's well worth the effort.

I have a thorough explication of the various meditation postures on my website. Click on "Meditation basics."
My first formal meditation training was with Shunryu Suzuki in the 60's and later with Kobun, Robert Aitken and many other teachers (mainly zen). However, I've spent the most time practicing on my own, which is all I do now. I'm living in a rather isolated area so I miss connecting with other practitioners. Despite my interest in zen I've made an effort to remain secular. You can visit my website at http://www.frogzen.com

Offline apb123

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Re: Meditation Posture
« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2016, 01:28:59 pm »
I used a cushion (meditation cushion) on the floor for years.

However I now just sit an office chair. I find that most comfortable.

Offline zafrogzen

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Re: Meditation Posture
« Reply #8 on: April 17, 2016, 10:23:06 pm »
I've spent some time sitting on a chair when my knees were injured (from outside activities) and there's essentially not a lot of difference, but I've found sitting in a chair is actually harder in the long run than sitting in the half or full lotus. There's a good reason why the traditional posture has been preferred down through the centuries -- from even long before the Buddha.
My first formal meditation training was with Shunryu Suzuki in the 60's and later with Kobun, Robert Aitken and many other teachers (mainly zen). However, I've spent the most time practicing on my own, which is all I do now. I'm living in a rather isolated area so I miss connecting with other practitioners. Despite my interest in zen I've made an effort to remain secular. You can visit my website at http://www.frogzen.com

 


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