Author Topic: Practices of Various Practitioners  (Read 1138 times)

Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #30 on: July 27, 2017, 09:43:03 pm »
Dhamma Study

There are numerous online sites, which provide translations of Buddha's teachings, commentaries, The Dhamma Pada,  The Jataka Tales, illustrated stories for both adults and children, video , and audio lectures from noted Buddhist scholars, Buddhist communities, which specialize in continuing the dissemination of Buddha's words.

In addition to all of these are WIKIs, which specialize in historical and biographical data regarding Buddhist history, and scholarly discussions of  Buddhist traditions and the contributions, which they have made to the documentation and preservation of The Buddha's words and advisories.

Today we can read daily dhamma talks from Bhikkhu's and Bhikkhuni's from all over the world, and even ask them questions that have arisen during our pursuit of the understanding of Buddha's teachings, ancient and current culture, architecture, and other Buddhist matters.

Various motion pictures and documentaries have been produced over the years:  Sidhartha is one of my personal favorites, which tells the story of Buddha from birth till his death while on Earth as a bodhisatta before his enlightenment.  Another I enjoyed was "Summer Fall Winter Spring", which was about a Korean Zen Priest and a boy he cared for who was abandoned at his monastery. 

Service to the Buddhist Community

From 1998 till today I have been personally involved in various capacities as a volunteer offering both lay and monastic services, which facilitate the translation, interpretation, and dissemination of Buddha's words as translated by scholarlarly monastics, who have made it their life's work to translate and disseminate Buddha's words and the words of early monastic followers, some from the original Holy Sangha.

I also have acted, and still currently act in the capacity of a phone and personal service contact for those visiting our community and/or looking for Buddhist fellowship and/or support in our ecumenical organization, The Unitarian Universalist Church of Concord, N.H., U.S.A.

Our Website here at Free Sangha provides ample lists of contact information for Buddhist organizations of many traditions, which I have personally utilized, and recommend to newcomers.

I have found participation in such organization an important and rewarding part of personal practice and recommend that everyone, who has an interest contribute both their time and financial resources to the organizations of their choice.  It is through such personal efforts and contributions that Buddha's teachings continue to reach all those, who have an interest in studying and living The Dhamma.

« Last Edit: July 28, 2017, 07:50:04 am by Ron-the-Elder »
What Makes an Elder? :
A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

Offline ground

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #31 on: July 28, 2017, 08:42:52 am »
Dhamma Study

There are numerous online sites, which provide translations of Buddha's teachings, commentaries, The Dhamma Pada,  The Jataka Tales, illustrated stories for both adults and children, video , and audio lectures from noted Buddhist scholars, Buddhist communities, which specialize in continuing the dissemination of Buddha's words.


I think you're a bit biased. There is nothing to say against the pali konon resources but one should mention that there is a variety of other buddhist resources, especially from Mahayana buddhism which comprises vajrayana.
E.g. I would especially recommend the prajnaparamita sutras and the madhyamaka philosophies arising in the wake of these.

Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #32 on: July 28, 2017, 10:14:35 am »
Quote
ground "I think you're a bit biased."

True.  We are all biased based upon our own experiences with regard to our individual practices.   The idea of this thread is to share our individual practice experience.  Thank you for sharing  your experience.   Feel free to share more of your own experiences both here and throughout the website.

Mahayana is much broader than vajrayana as others have already shared in this thread and in other forum locations within Free Sangha.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2017, 10:16:58 am by Ron-the-Elder »
What Makes an Elder? :
A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

Offline ground

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #33 on: July 28, 2017, 01:10:01 pm »
Mahayana is much broader than vajrayana as others have already shared in this thread and in other forum locations within Free Sangha.
That is certainly not the case which is evidence that one should not go by what others say but study authentic buddhist texts.
Vajrayana is no different from Mahayana but applies skillful means that accelerate the progress towards buddhahood.

Offline VisuddhiRaptor

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #34 on: July 28, 2017, 02:44:38 pm »
E.g. I would especially recommend the prajnaparamita sutras and the madhyamaka philosophies arising in the wake of these.

Why u spamming this thread with your fundamentalism to written ideologies? This is a practise thread. Prajnaparamita such as the Chinese created Heart Sutra and Madhyamaka often cannot be practised. Often they are only intellectual philosophies or superstitions. That is why Mahayana practise teachers like Thích Nhất Hạnh say they have errors.

If you could actually write a clear post about how you actually practise these ideologies then maybe you could share something useful and change other people's attitudes towards these superstitions.

But, for now, ideas such as there is no suffering, no end of suffering, no eye, no ear, no nose, etc, are pure superstition & unBuddhist.

Online IdleChater

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #35 on: July 28, 2017, 05:03:37 pm »
E.g. I would especially recommend the prajnaparamita sutras and the madhyamaka philosophies arising in the wake of these.

Why u spamming this thread with your fundamentalism to written ideologies? This is a practise thread. Prajnaparamita such as the Chinese created Heart Sutra and Madhyamaka often cannot be practised.

They can.  The Heart Sutra is a used as a pre-meditation chanting practice by many, including me.  The Madhyamaka practice of reduction towards the middle is a usefull approach to analytical meditation.

Quote
Often they are only intellectual philosophies or superstitions. That is why Mahayana practise teachers like Thích Nhất Hạnh say they have errors.

What errors are those?

Quote
But, for now, ideas such as there is no suffering, no end of suffering, no eye, no ear, no nose, etc, are pure superstition & unBuddhist.

You misquote - it should be In emptiness, there is no .....  see https://www.lamayeshe.com/article/heart-sutra.

They are not superstition and un Buddhist. 

Ground may be and do a lot of things, but his post is far from spamming.



Offline VisuddhiRaptor

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #36 on: July 28, 2017, 07:19:08 pm »
What errors are those?

What I wrote. If there is no eye, no ear, no nose, no tongue, etc, then what exactly is this 'eye', 'ear', 'nose', 'tongue', etc, that is sought to be negated & deemed to not exist?  if there is no eye & no body, how is this internet page read & typed on? If there is no Free Sangha Buddhist forum; then what is this?   

 :teehee:

Quote
So, in emptiness, there is no body,
no feeling, no thought,
no will, no consciousness.
There are no eyes, no ears,
no nose, no tongue,
no body, no mind.
There is no seeing, no hearing,
no smelling, no tasting,
no touching, no imagining.
There is nothing seen, nor heard,
nor smelled, nor tasted,
nor touched, nor imagined.

There is no ignorance,
and no end to ignorance.
There is no old age and death,
and no end to old age and death.
There is no suffering, no cause of suffering,
no end to suffering, no path to follow.
There is no attainment of wisdom,
and no wisdom to attain.


 :lmfao:
« Last Edit: July 28, 2017, 07:26:09 pm by VisuddhiRaptor »

Offline VisuddhiRaptor

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #37 on: July 28, 2017, 07:21:17 pm »
 :focus:

Offline VisuddhiRaptor

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #38 on: July 28, 2017, 07:45:16 pm »
The Precepts:

"Abstaining from sexual misconduct.".

Thank you Ron for generously kindly & sharing your life story & practise. I will contribute also.

Before I discovered Buddhism & religion, my 'spiritual life' started when I left my girlfriend of 4 years & she became severely heartbroken. While I felt no obligation to her (since we never signed any kind of contract) & tried my best to support her, I came to the intuitive disposition to not have sexual relations with a woman unless I was committed to her. Since I had no interest in commitment & marriage, I intuitively become celibate; even though I began working at that time as a manager in the hospitality industry and had many keen female employees & customers.

Around 20 months later I wandered into a Buddhist monastery when travelling in Asia and discovered meditation, which satisfied my search & my life. After doing four meditation retreats, I was completely satisfied with Buddhism as a way of life. While sex has not been an aspect of my life for many years now, my spiritual life began intuitively from not wanting to cause harm with sex. This is why I consider the sexual misconduct precept to be maybe the most important because, to me, it greatly determines our capacity to truly love others.

 :twocents:

Offline VisuddhiRaptor

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #39 on: July 28, 2017, 08:02:01 pm »
Precepts:

"Abstain from mind altering substances."

Before the relationship ending with my girlfriend, I was very keen on smoking marijuana. For the most part, my close friends (but not my girlfriend) would get very high & expanded and listen to really good music, watch one or two really good bands or jam with guitars. Occasionally I got drunk but was mostly a marijuana user.

However, a few days after the devastation of my girlfriend, I took my friends to watch a psychedelic & environmental movie called Koyaanisqatsi, which someone had taken me to view a few weeks before. We were stoned watching the movie & my friends were laughing at it. They did not understand it. The thought arose in my mind they were idiots. Then I thought of my friend, my girlfriend, and said to myself: "You are here stoned watching a movie & she is devastated. You do not even know what you are doing with your life & how you are affecting others".

After that, I stopped smoking marijuana & didn't drink, apart from an occasional small social drink after work with the employees.

Later, I came to realise the phrase: "Sex-drugs-&-rocknroll" is so apt. When I lost interest in sex, I simultaneously lost interest in drugs & rocknroll. Although I continued to learn music, I only listened to spiritual jazz-rock-fusion music.

Even although at the time my mind developed some existential dilemmas, I felt very free, strong, unburdened & relieved by dropping sex & drugs.

 :twocents:

Offline VisuddhiRaptor

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #40 on: July 28, 2017, 08:19:50 pm »
The Precepts:

"Cause no harm to sentient beings / living beings."

While I was always an anti-war person, the 1st time I had a spiritual premonition about non-killing was at this same traumatic time with my girlfriend. I was shocked by her devastation. Previously, my father was a very good fisherman & my friends & I would get stoned often and go fishing. But with my father, I would never catch any fish and he would catch so many fish and he would make fun of me.

One afternoon, I felt sad about my ex-girlfriend and decided to go fishing alone in a quiet place. My father made fun of me, saying I would not catch anything. I was determined to catch something. I was fishing for about two hours and it was getting dark. I caught nothing but suddenly, as I was about to leave, I large fish hooked on my fishing line. I got very excited, thinking: "I will show the old man". I was standing on a rock at the edge of the ocean and as I was pulling the fish from the water something in me hesitated. The fish was looking at me in the eye & I was looking into the fish's eye. I froze. I felt sympathy for the fish. Then a small wave pushed the fish against the rock and it fell off my hook. I felt very happy. I felt what is the purpose of this fishing? I returned home & my father asked me how I went & I quietly said: "No luck".

From that time, I also stopped fishing with my father & friends (although I do recall fishing only once on a holiday alone, where I caught some dinner). But that was the first time I felt compassion towards an ordinary lifeform, such as a fish.

Over the past two months, where I live, people are catching so many fish. I see them everyday on my morning work. I would save me money on food if I fished. They suggest I do. But I decline. While I do not think it is bad kamma to fish for food, I prefer not to.

 :twocents:


Offline VisuddhiRaptor

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #41 on: July 28, 2017, 08:28:17 pm »
Precepts:  "Take not that which has not been freely given."

I have never had any real problems with this precept although temptations can arise.

For example, down the street the local council just mulched lots of mulch from old trees for their use on the local public & street gardens. It is tempting to steal some for my garden but naturally I will not.

Or I have started this financial year badly in my business (even though it should be OK by years end but I cannot predict). I could dishonestly adjust last years tax income down (by adjusting my stock on hand at the end of the year) in a way which means simply having more tax income this year. But I will not do it.

Why create worry & regret for smallish things.  :twocents:

Offline VisuddhiRaptor

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #42 on: July 28, 2017, 08:40:45 pm »
Precepts:

Refraining from incorrect speech.

Fortunately, the precept of speech for Buddhist lay people is refraining from false or dishonest speech, namely, lying. I have never had any problems with this although it has been my downfall at crucial times in life where I refused to engage in politically correct speech, such as professionally. But you move on. Who wants to work with dishonest corrupt people, anyway?

As for pleasant & non-divisive speech (which are two of the four factors of Right Speech in the Noble Eightfold Path), to perfect this would make Buddhist internet forums boring & unchallenging.

 :teehee: :twocents:

Offline ground

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #43 on: July 29, 2017, 12:51:13 am »
E.g. I would especially recommend the prajnaparamita sutras and the madhyamaka philosophies arising in the wake of these.

Why u spamming this thread with your fundamentalism to written ideologies?
I am not spamming this thread but I am adding additional features of practise since this thread is for 'various practitioners' not only for theravada practitioners.

This is a practise thread. Prajnaparamita such as the Chinese created Heart Sutra and Madhyamaka often cannot be practised.
If you don't consider mind to be the agent of practise then you should practise physical yoga. If mind weren't the agent of practise how could Bāhiya have attained liberation through merely hearing the words of the buddha?


If you could actually write a clear post about how you actually practise these ideologies then maybe you could share something useful and change other people's attitudes towards these superstitions.
These are not ideologies but expressions of ultimate reality that is concealed by ordinary mind. Since there are already many clear-cut treatises revealing the meaning of the prajnaparamita sutras and the madhyamaka philosophies I do not have to re-invent the wheel.
Words are the expression of experience but words are not the experience that they express..

But, for now, ideas such as there is no suffering, no end of suffering, no eye, no ear, no nose, etc, are pure superstition & unBuddhist.
If you were right then liberation would be impossible. So actually your words are very 'unBuddhist'.

Offline ground

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #44 on: July 29, 2017, 01:07:00 am »
What errors are those?

What I wrote. If there is no eye, no ear, no nose, no tongue, etc, then what exactly is this 'eye', 'ear', 'nose', 'tongue', etc, that is sought to be negated & deemed to not exist?  if there is no eye & no body, how is this internet page read & typed on? If there is no Free Sangha Buddhist forum; then what is this?   
See, you misunderstanding is exactly the reason why the meaning of thes sutras had to be revealed by budddhist masters. These sutras often jump to an outright expression of ultimate reality. But how could ultimate reality be consistently expressed by means of conventional words? It is impossible! On the other hand how could someone be led to perceive ultimate reality him-/herself without using conventional words? This is impossible, too!
So there is a dilemma and this dilemma is resolved by the madhyamaka philosophies which show how to access ultimate reality rationally. But accessing ultimate reality rationally only leads to a concordant concept of ultimate reality. While a concordant concept of ultimate reality is not direct perception of ultimate reality it is however is the prerequisite for direct perception of ultimate reality. But - althouth it is a prerequisite - knowing the concordant concept of ultimate reality does not necesessarily effect the direct perception of ultimate reality.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2017, 01:16:38 am by ground »

 


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