Author Topic: Practices of Various Practitioners  (Read 1141 times)

Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #60 on: August 02, 2017, 04:32:15 am »
Uposatha Days:

My wife and I, and some members of our meditation group observe celebrations of various Buddhist memorable / memorial days, or days of celebration, which are called Uposatha Days:

Following is a list of such days which specific dates vary yearly depending upon the appearance of full moons during the lunar month:

Quote
Magha Puja (usually in February)
This day, sometimes called "Sangha Day," commemorates the spontaneous assembly of 1,250 arahants in the Buddha's presence. One thousand of the gathered monks had previously achieved Awakening upon hearing the Buddha's delivery of the Fire Sermon; the remaining 250 were followers of the elder monks Ven. Moggallana and Ven. Sariputta. To mark this auspicious gathering, the Buddha delivered the "Ovada-Patimokkha Gatha" (see "A Chanting Guide"), a summary of the main points of the Dhamma, which the Buddha gave to the assembly before sending them out to proclaim the doctrine. [Suggested reading: "Dhamma for Everyone" by Ajaan Lee.]
Visakha Puja (Vesak) (usually in May)
This day, sometimes called "Buddha Day," commemorates three key events in the Buddha's life that took place on this full-moon day: his birth, Awakening, and final Unbinding (parinibbana). [Suggested reading: "Visakha Puja" by Ajaan Lee.]
Asalha Puja (usually in July)
This day, sometimes called "Dhamma Day," commemorates the Buddha's first discourse, which he gave to the group of five monks with whom he had practiced in the forest for many years. Upon hearing this discourse, one of the monks ( Ven. Kondañña) gained his first glimpse of Nibbana, thus giving birth to the Noble Sangha. The annual Rains retreat (vassa) begins the following day.
Pavarana Day (usually in October).
This day marks the end of the Rains retreat (vassa). In the following month, the kathina ceremony is held, during which the laity gather to make formal offerings of robe cloth and other requisites to the Sangha.
Anapanasati Day (usually in November).
At the end of one rains retreat (vassa), the Buddha was so pleased with the progress of the assembled monks that he encouraged them to extend their retreat for yet another month. On the full-moon day marking the end of that fourth month of retreat, he presented his instructions on mindfulness of breathing (anapanasati), which may be found in the Anapanasati Sutta (MN 118) — The Discourse on Mindfulness of Breathing.
See also:

Muluposatha Sutta (AN 3.70) — Discourse on the Roots of the Uposatha
Uposatha Sutta (AN 8.41) — Discourse on the Uposatha Observance
Visakhuposatha Sutta (AN 8.43) — Discourse to Visakha on the Uposatha
Sakka Sutta (AN 10.46) — To the Sakyans (on the Uposatha)
Ñanavara Thera's Questions-and-answers concerning the Uposatha.
Lay Buddhist Practice, by Bhikkhu Khantipalo (BPS Wheel Publication No. 206)


You may read about these, or do some additional research here:  http://www.accesstoinsight.org/ptf/dhamma/sila/uposatha.html

As far as practice is concerned, the main currency for my own personal practice is a reexamination of my practice.  Was it beneficial, or has it lead to additional suffering.  There is also a reexamination of refuge in The Buddha, The Dhamma and The Sangha.

Also, it is during this time period that I am reminded of any need for support of our teachers, researchers and scholars in their work to translate and dessiminate The Dhamma to those, who are in need.

Another personal aspect of such days is to remember friends, who have died, or whose families are in need of support.  This is what I will be doing this week as I was just given news that a childhood friend died in an accident, while exiting a hospital where he was going for periodic health examinations.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2017, 09:10:01 am by Ron-the-Elder »
What Makes an Elder? :
A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

Offline VisuddhiRaptor

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #61 on: August 02, 2017, 02:10:38 pm »

Here from the suttas is the general principle of conditionality in dependent origination:

"When this is, that is.
From the arising of this comes the arising of that.
When this isn't, that isn't.
From the cessation of this comes the cessation of that."
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/kn/ud/ud.1.03.than.html

Unrelated to the discussion. You seem to be copy & pasting from a blind faith that the words you misconstrue are somehow related to your personal imaginings.

Quote
And finally an extract from the Phena Sutta, which looks remarkably similar to the Heart Sutra:

"Form is like a glob of foam;
feeling, a bubble;
perception, a mirage;
fabrications, a banana tree;
consciousness, a magic trick —
   this has been taught
   by the Kinsman of the Sun.
However you observe them,
appropriately examine them,
they're empty, void
   to whoever sees them
   appropriately."
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn22/sn22.095.than.html

The Phena Sutta does not deny form, feeling, perceptions, thoughts & consciousness. The Phena Sutta merely comments upon their transient, intangible & unsatisfactory nature. 

Even though you do not even know what the word 'sunnata' ('emptiness') means, the Phena Sutta does not even use the word 'sunnata' ('empty'; 'void'). Click on this link: https://suttacentral.net/pi/sn22.95 & search for the word 'sunn'. The result will be empty or absent of 'sunna' or 'sunno' or 'sunnata'.

You are clinging to a mistranslation & erroneously clinging to that mistranslation as equating with the equally faulty & dodgy Chinese Mahayana Heart Sutra.

The relevant Pali words in the Phena Sutta are 'rittaka', 'tucchaka' & 'asāra', which mean 'insubstantial', 'fruitless', 'vain', 'worthless', etc. This words do not have the superstitious meaning of the Chinese Mahayana Heart Sutra.

These Pali words appear to be statements about certain characteristics of the five aggregates rather than your materialist, nihilistic & 'animalistic' ideas about things 'existing' or 'not existing'; which is included in the definition of 'animalistic speech', as follows:
Quote
If, while he is dwelling by means of this dwelling, his mind inclines to speaking, he resolves that 'I will not engage in talk that is base, vulgar, common, ignoble, unbeneficial, that does not lead to disenchantment, dispassion, cessation, calm, direct knowledge, self-awakening, or Unbinding — i.e., talk about kings, robbers, & ministers of state; armies, alarms, & battles; food & drink; clothing, furniture, garlands, & scents; relatives; vehicles; villages, towns, cities, the countryside; women & heroes; the gossip of the street & the well; tales of the dead; tales of diversity, the creation of the world & of the sea; talk of whether things exist or not.' In this way he is alert there.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.122.than.html


Quote
And of course conditionality ( aka emptiness )

Conditionality is not emptiness. For example, Nibbana is emptiness but not conditionality. Please think intelligently about what you post rather than engage in superstitious brainwashed group think. You are just parroting common ideas held by worldlings.

Quote
is something that can be observed directly in practice, for example in the context of satipatthana - you would know this if you had done any serious practice.  Instead your main practice seems to be proselytising your particular brand of Thai Forest dogma, and relentlessly patronising other Buddhists.

Please refrain from the practise of telling lies to give a false impression you are enlightened. Please uphold the 4th precept. You believe in all kinds of unknowable superstitions, such as reincarnation rebirth. You misconstrue the most basic teachings, as shown in this topic. Your views about "a being" are the same as those of Mara in SN 5.10. Mara, like you, believes the aggregates are "a being". Where as those with Right View know "a being" is merely a view or idea generated by the mind.

 :teehee:  :listen:
« Last Edit: August 02, 2017, 02:37:50 pm by VisuddhiRaptor »

Offline ground

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #62 on: August 02, 2017, 08:46:10 pm »

Here from the suttas is the general principle of conditionality in dependent origination:

"When this is, that is.
From the arising of this comes the arising of that.
When this isn't, that isn't.
From the cessation of this comes the cessation of that."
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/kn/ud/ud.1.03.than.html

Unrelated to the discussion. You seem to be copy & pasting from a blind faith that the words you misconstrue are somehow related to your personal imaginings.

Quote
And finally an extract from the Phena Sutta, which looks remarkably similar to the Heart Sutra:

"Form is like a glob of foam;
feeling, a bubble;
perception, a mirage;
fabrications, a banana tree;
consciousness, a magic trick —
   this has been taught
   by the Kinsman of the Sun.
However you observe them,
appropriately examine them,
they're empty, void
   to whoever sees them
   appropriately."
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn22/sn22.095.than.html

The Phena Sutta does not deny form, feeling, perceptions, thoughts & consciousness. The Phena Sutta merely comments upon their transient, intangible & unsatisfactory nature.


VisuddhiRaptor, you are persistently confusing emptiness with non-existence. However what emptiness denies is true existence, i.e. existence from the objects side, i.e. existence how existence appears innately. Emptiness does neither negate nominal or conventional existence nor the functioning of empty things. Emptiness does not negate causality.
This of course cannnot be understood by a mind that has not perceived emptiness directly since the words applied cause conflicting concepts in such an ordinary mind. Therefore such a mind has to meet an instruction that complies with its specific conditioning and leads it to the direct experience of what is called 'emptiness of true existence'.

Quote
So long as the two understandings - of appearance, 
Which is undeceiving dependent origination, 
And emptiness devoid of all theses - remain separate,
So long you have not realized the intent of the Sage.

However at some point when, without alternation but at once,
The instant you see that dependent origination is undeceiving,
If the entire object of grasping at certitude is dismantled,
At that point your analysis of the view has culminated.

Furthermore when appearance dispels the extreme of existence,
And when emptiness dispels the extreme of non-existence,
And if you understand how emptiness arises as cause and effect,
You will never be captivated by views grasping at extremes.

The Three Principal Aspects Of The Path

« Last Edit: August 02, 2017, 09:06:17 pm by ground »

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #63 on: August 03, 2017, 01:29:53 am »
You seem to be copy & pasting from a blind faith that the words you misconstrue are somehow related to your personal imaginings.

This is pure projection on your part since you are merely parrotting ideas you have grasped from the likes of Buddhadasa.  All you do is proselytize and patronise, all you do is automatically reject any Buddhist teaching which doesn't match your narrow Buddhadasa dogma.

These Pali words appear to be statements about certain characteristics of the five aggregates rather than your materialist, nihilistic & 'animalistic' ideas about things 'existing' or 'not existing'; which is included in the definition of 'animalistic speech', as follows:
talk of whether things exist or not.'

Again this is pure projection on your part, since you are the one who is concerned with the "existence" of the aggregates.  It is clear from the suttas that the aggregates only arise in dependence on conditions, which means they are empty of inherent existence, they lack independent existence and so are empty.  You clearly have no understanding of conditionality in the suttas, or emptiness in the Mahayana, or of the equivalence between them.

Please refrain from the practise of telling lies to give a false impression you are enlightened. Please uphold the 4th precept. You believe in all kinds of unknowable superstitions, such as reincarnation rebirth.

Again, pure projection on your part.   Please refrain from being so arrogant and patronising, and please refrain from these ad hom attacks.  I am not being dishonest, and I have not claimed that I an enlightened ( I notice you level these accusations against anyone who disagrees with you ).   Clearly you have a very fragile ego and you cannot cope with disagreement or challenge.  So your instinct is to lash out and attack any dissent to your gross sectarianism and your tiresome Buddhadasa dogma.  You are a sort of obnoxious Buddhist Borg.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2017, 01:50:56 am by Spiny Norman »

Offline VisuddhiRaptor

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #64 on: August 03, 2017, 03:28:35 am »
You cannot cope with disagreement or challenge

No. You are not challenging. Your posts are wrong. If they were correct, I would agree with them, such as one post somewhere I agreed with.

It is clear from the suttas that the aggregates only arise in dependence on conditions, which means they are empty of inherent existence, they lack independent existence and so are empty. 

No. The suttas do not say this. It is not clear. Your ideas have not relationship to the Pali suttas.  :dharma:

Offline The Artis Magistra

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #65 on: August 05, 2017, 01:51:56 pm »
VisuddhiRaptor, I think what really seems to bother people is the kind of style in which you respond to things. It gives the impression you are being extremely rude and arrogant and people get offended.

I read your story about how you became more interested in Buddhist thought but I think you are also hurting peoples feelings on the internet and these are real people too, some of them might be sick or have mental issues even. If you could behave more lovingly and kindly and less menacingly towards all the people, you can easily say the same stuff you enjoy writing about without pooping on them and being insulting, even if they are insulting to you.

As you must know, there is nothing much to gain by all the unpleasantness generated back and forth, and one can at the very least not contribute to it by simply responding with your excellent wisdom and understandings while moderating the tone and words which you can hopefully can tell would cause another some distress as a personal insult.

I don't know why you are the way you are, but I would like to know more about it and why you are seen doing this stuff, seeming so belligerent and hateful in the way you behave online.

My writing is usually disliked by certain people but my purpose in that style is to excite and generate interest and enthusiasm by the boisterousness or silliness but its not meant to sting or slice at people. Its also for the promotion of Open Buddhism and a broad and inclusive investigation of Buddhist history and thought, not a particular narrow school, since the majority of what has been called Buddhist has occurred after the death of Siddhartha Gautama and has all sorts of things and ideas as part of it.

Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: Practices of Various Practitioners
« Reply #66 on: August 06, 2017, 03:06:56 am »
 :goodpost:   :focus:

Artifacts


Over the years I have collected various Buddhist artifacts and copies / reproductions of Buddhist Artifacts.

Some of the most famous of Buddhist artifacts are Sand Mandalas, which seem to be particular to The Tibetan practice.  The idea is to create something of beauty with the full realization that, because of its delicate, or fragile nature that the first disturbing event which come along, the Mandala will be destroyed.  Usually this is done by the monks, who created it in the first place.  I think of it as a statement that beauty does not guarantee permanence.

Here is a WIKI which goes into much more detail regarding this topic:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sand_mandala

Relics are also another form of Buddhist artifact, which are collected in memory, and to honor certain Buddhist practitioners from antiquity, including The Buddha himself.

Here is another WIKI, which discusses this topic:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C5%9Aar%C4%ABra

Paintings, particularly ancient paintings and their reproductions and prints are something that I personally collect.  One of my sons-in-law is a artist turned para-legal, and he has provided me with a collection of reproductions of Buddha, which I display in my office-sitting room.

Also in this very same room I have various statues of Buddhas from different locations around the world.  My favorite is a bronze reproduction of a Zen Buddha from Japan.



My reasons for this collection is not only the appreciation of the art work which went into their creation, but to honor the personages for which they were created.

Before sitting practice my custom is to face the buddha representation (statue or painting) to honor him along with the dhamma, which he has provided to the world.

During uposatha (days of cellebration) a selected relic is often place into a more centralized location in our home and given the respect for the personage it represents. :dharma:

With this addition, since there seem to be no other Buddhist practitioners making contributions to this thread I will close the thread.

Please feel free to open another thread if you wish to make further contributions regarding this or other topics.
What Makes an Elder? :
A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

 


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