Author Topic: Siddhartha's Path  (Read 849 times)

Offline Ger

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Siddhartha's Path
« on: March 04, 2018, 11:06:58 am »
Hello all,

I have just finished the book "Siddhartha" by Herman Hesse and was quite taken by the story.  In fact I can't get it out of my mind.  It was both moving and frightening.  I came in contact with the title while doing some reading here on this list.

My question is this:  For those of you who have read the book, which school of Buddhism is most closely observed in the journey of the main character? Or do you see a mixture of several? I have read there are 4 main schools, and other subcategories.




Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: Siddhartha's Path
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2018, 03:41:03 pm »
Hi, Ger.

Haven't read the book, but did see the movie.  Can't say that any particular school or tradition most exemplifies Sidhartha's path, because none of them existed until he followed it.

Having said that, all of them follow his teachings, and many have adopted cultural variations due to their particular cultures in which they were practiced.  For example Tibetan Buddhism arose in Tibet, Zen in Japan / Vietnam, Theravadan in Southern Asia.

My suggestion is always the same:  Investigate as many of them as you care too until you find yourself comfortable with what you find / experience.

_/\_Ron
What Makes an Elder? :
A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

Offline Ger

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Re: Siddhartha's Path
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2018, 08:01:37 pm »
Hi, Ger.

Haven't read the book, but did see the movie.  Can't say that any particular school or tradition most exemplifies Sidhartha's path, because none of them existed until he followed it.

Having said that, all of them follow his teachings, and many have adopted cultural variations due to their particular cultures in which they were practiced.  For example Tibetan Buddhism arose in Tibet, Zen in Japan / Vietnam, Theravadan in Southern Asia.

My suggestion is always the same:  Investigate as many of them as you care too until you find yourself comfortable with what you find / experience.

_/\_Ron

Thanks Ron, very sound advice.  I would like to do just that.  The freedom to investigate and search feels pretty good to me.

Offline stillpointdancer

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Re: Siddhartha's Path
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2018, 07:23:48 am »
Hello all,

I have just finished the book "Siddhartha" by Herman Hesse and was quite taken by the story.  In fact I can't get it out of my mind.  It was both moving and frightening.  I came in contact with the title while doing some reading here on this list.

My question is this:  For those of you who have read the book, which school of Buddhism is most closely observed in the journey of the main character? Or do you see a mixture of several? I have read there are 4 main schools, and other subcategories.
I've read the book three or four times now. I think it's an attempt by Hesse to tease out what he thought were the main points of the various schools of Buddhism he was studying at the time, and to bring them together in a story.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Offline Pixie

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Re: Siddhartha's Path
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2018, 08:18:18 am »
Hi Ger,

You can read more about the novel, its themes and influences, at Wikipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siddhartha_(novel)

With best wishes,


Pixie _/|\_
May all beings have happiness and the causes of happiness.
May they all be free from suffering and the causes of suffering.
May they never be deprived of true happiness devoid of any suffering.
May they abide in great impartiality, free from attachment to loved ones and aversion to others.

Offline Ger

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Re: Siddhartha's Path
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2018, 05:01:03 am »
Quote
I've read the book three or four times now. I think it's an attempt by Hesse to tease out what he thought were the main points of the various schools of Buddhism he was studying at the time, and to bring them together in a story.

Thanks, that's interesting. I'm not yet experienced enough to appreciate all the various nuances but perhaps this is my chance to learn them.  Just started my second reading of the book, along with other things from the resources here. :)

Offline Ger

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Re: Siddhartha's Path
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2018, 05:14:27 am »
Hi Ger,

You can read more about the novel, its themes and influences, at Wikipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siddhartha_(novel)

With best wishes,


Pixie _/|\_

Thanks Pixie! I look forward to reading this article, either this morning or this evening after work. I never knew this book existed before I came here and had only associated the name Hesse with "Steppenwolf".

Offline Shogun

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Re: Siddhartha's Path
« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2018, 03:56:47 am »
I havent read nor even heard of this book until now.  Thank you though, its now on my audio book list (I have a long commute, so I live on podcasts and audio books).

Offline Ger

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Re: Siddhartha's Path
« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2018, 05:02:01 am »
I havent read nor even heard of this book until now.  Thank you though, its now on my audio book list (I have a long commute, so I live on podcasts and audio books).

Great!  Hope you enjoy the audio version.  In my work I go to various job sites, usually local, but sometimes I get those out of towners with a long commute. 

Offline Lotusmile

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Re: Siddhartha's Path
« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2018, 02:05:24 am »
Hi, Ger.

Haven't read the book, but did see the movie.  Can't say that any particular school or tradition most exemplifies Sidhartha's path, because none of them existed until he followed it.

Having said that, all of them follow his teachings, and many have adopted cultural variations due to their particular cultures in which they were practiced.  For example Tibetan Buddhism arose in Tibet, Zen in Japan / Vietnam, Theravadan in Southern Asia.

My suggestion is always the same:  Investigate as many of them as you care too until you find yourself comfortable with what you find / experience.

_/\_Ron
All schools of buddhism books pointed to the same core of enlightenment. Liken to a common hall with many doors. To access the hall from the outside, you need only to open any door. Investigating all doors is usually wasting of time as the focus would be diversified.

Offline Ger

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Re: Siddhartha's Path
« Reply #10 on: March 13, 2018, 07:21:42 pm »
All schools of buddhism books pointed to the same core of enlightenment. Liken to a common hall with many doors. To access the hall from the outside, you need only to open any door. Investigating all doors is usually wasting of time as the focus would be diversified.

I like the analogy, and have often likened my path to walking through the open door.  The thing is, the waiting.  No door on the path can be opened by my own force or effort, I am helpless in this way.  So I watch, wait, hope for that next door to open.  Sometimes the wait can be long, sometimes not. Waiting doesn't mean inactivity, but if I find if I push too hard or too fast, the path will elude me.  Or worse, even laugh at me like the river laughed at Siddhartha! :)

 


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