Author Topic: weirdness after meditation  (Read 499 times)

Offline mox42

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weirdness after meditation
« on: January 11, 2017, 05:07:13 am »
Hello. I dont consider myself buddhist but over the last few months as Ive slowly started to learn more about buddhism ive found it to be in line whith my own ponderings about things. There is tons of material so i dont really have any questions about that i cant google for now. But i have a problem that i cant really get around on my own.
I was reasearching meditation as a way to try to manage my anxiety without medication because i have bad side effects to most avalible. It was one of many changes i incorporated into my life to tackle the issue full on. Everything semed to work but lately Ive found that the second i finish meditating i get overwhalmed by the sudden influx of thought. as if it cant finish slowly but there is a change in mode in which form somewhat focused and calm state I get into complete emotional and intelectual overload in a split second usually followed by a prolonged empty, flat, depressed feeling. Since buddhists seem to be the worlds leading experts on meditation i hooped you cold tell me what am i doing wrong? should i stop meditating until i get back on medication since i know it helps me control those kind of things? should my meditation be more structured (instead of just trying random techniques, should i focus more on one)?

I ve seen people say that crying and feelings of overwhelmness are sometimes there after meditation, but i dont think thats the same type of thing. Usually i slip into depression on my own from time to time to time,  but more i meditate more it triggers that kind of state. does anyone have similar experiences?

Offline Dianet

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Re: weirdness after meditation
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2017, 06:24:24 am »
Hi there,

I was quite intrigued by your question when I first read it and was hoping some of our more prolific posters would take it on, since I'm in possession of way more questions than answers myself.

My first thought is that maybe your choice of methods or focus of meditation might be modified to get you better "results".

My second thought is that over my few years of meditation, one of my main insights is that thoughts and emotions are just momentary passing impermanent states with no solidity. You might be able to just let the "rush" of feelings pass by find yourself safe and sane and unattached in the next moment.

Not sure if that's helpful.

 I think meditation has something to offer that you can't get from medication, though certainly if combining them works well for you, that might be the way to go.

Diane

Offline mox42

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Re: weirdness after meditation
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2017, 05:19:44 am »
Thank you for the answer. I find it easier to maintain focus and generally be more in the moment on medication. But im worryed that they might influence the benefits i get from meditation since i feel and think much different whan im normal.  Like "insights" you get on psychadelics for instance, temporary. I see no long term value in drugs, but i see plenty in meditation. Its just that feeling like that afterwards is not somemething I've expected and I've learned to be cautious when those kind of feelings start.
Ill just keep at it for as long as possible. Over the last few days ive been thinking its just my trechorous mind tying to make me half ass it.

Offline Dianet

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Re: weirdness after meditation
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2017, 07:05:13 am »
Good luck to you. Sounds like you're on your own without a like-minded community, as am I. So I'll encourage you to keep at it. Unless you really feel that there's something dangerous to your sanity going on. I wouldn't want to suggest you ignore your own early warning system.   

Offline zafrogzen

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Re: weirdness after meditation
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2017, 11:20:02 am »
I’m hesitant to comment on this issue because I have no experience with it myself and I’m not a psychiatric professional. If the medication is effective, I don’t see why you aren’t taking it, or why meditation might interfere with it or visa versa. If the effects of meditation without it are negative, maybe you should wait until you’re back on medication.

Also you don’t say what form of meditation you’re doing. You might experiment with different meditation techniques. Mindfulness practice is very popular in the psychiatric community, so it must have some benefits. Positive visualization and thoughts should be good for anxiety.

Maybe you’re trying too hard to repress mental activity so that when you stop you have a rebound effect.

Meditation can be a little like psychoactive drugs, which can cause mental problems in some individuals, so you’re good to be cautious. I don't think meditative samadhi is for everyone. The goal of some forms of meditation is to get rid of conditioning and be like a free-floating cloud, but that doesn't look like an antidote for anxiety. Faith and wisdom would seem to make more sense.

I’ve know several people with depression and anxiety who have had great results by taking up regular vigorous exercise, especially weightlifting and yoga, which flood the body/mind with good chemicals.

Please take good care of yourself.

My first formal meditation training was with Shunryu Suzuki in the 60's and later with Kobun, Robert Aitken and many other teachers (mainly zen). However, I've spent the most time practicing on my own, which is all I do now. I'm living in a rather isolated area so I miss connecting with other practitioners. Despite my interest in zen I've made an effort to remain secular. You can visit my website at http://www.frogzen.com

Offline si2

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Re: weirdness after meditation
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2017, 06:19:44 am »

Maybe you’re trying too hard to repress mental activity so that when you stop you have a rebound effect.


This is quite possible, meditation is more letting go than proactively repressing?

I echo the caution here and would advocate finding a good local meditation teacher.

Si
“All Experiences are preceded by mind, having mind as their master, created by the mind.”

http://www.addhanamagga.uk/

Offline zafrogzen

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Re: weirdness after meditation
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2017, 11:14:02 pm »
After doing a little research
http://mentalhealthdaily.com/2015/03/14/when-meditation-worsens-depression-or-anxiety/
https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/jan/23/is-mindfulness-making-us-ill

I added this to my basic meditation instructions --

NEGATIVE EFFECTS OF MEDITATION

Meditation is very powerful and like any powerful practice it can be dangerous for some. If you notice adverse effects such as anxiety and depression, stop the practice immediately. Meditation can make changes to the brain that can affect some people very negatively and take years to recover from. A meditation teacher might tell you to just work through it but everyone is different and even the most experienced teacher hasn’t seen all the possible outcomes.

Many folks start right out with a 10 day vipassana retreat or a week-long zen sesshin. That is very risky and for a few people can cause severe problems that last for years. Work into it very gradually and carefully.

For most of us meditation is beneficial, but it is not for everyone and it is not a cure-all.

My first formal meditation training was with Shunryu Suzuki in the 60's and later with Kobun, Robert Aitken and many other teachers (mainly zen). However, I've spent the most time practicing on my own, which is all I do now. I'm living in a rather isolated area so I miss connecting with other practitioners. Despite my interest in zen I've made an effort to remain secular. You can visit my website at http://www.frogzen.com

 


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