Author Topic: Where can I find a hollow Buddha statue?  (Read 454 times)

Offline dastaten

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Re: Where can I find a hollow Buddha statue?
« Reply #15 on: August 01, 2017, 02:14:14 am »
Interesting discussion. As I mentioned in my other post, I'm an atheist, so getting the statue 'consecrated' was only about tradition. But now that I think about it, I agree with Rahul. Seems to me the Buddha would have seen consecration as totally unnecessary, even a waste of time. The important thing is to have a reminder to practice the Dhamma, and any statue of the Buddha, filled and blessed or not, can serve that purpose.

I'm going to skip the consecration and just find a statue I like.

Thanks for your input, guys.
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Offline Rahul

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Re: Where can I find a hollow Buddha statue?
« Reply #16 on: August 01, 2017, 03:43:15 am »
Interesting discussion. As I mentioned in my other post, I'm an atheist, so getting the statue 'consecrated' was only about tradition. But now that I think about it, I agree with Rahul. Seems to me the Buddha would have seen consecration as totally unnecessary, even a waste of time. The important thing is to have a reminder to practice the Dhamma, and any statue of the Buddha, filled and blessed or not, can serve that purpose.

I'm going to skip the consecration and just find a statue I like.

Thanks for your input, guys.

I am glad you chose to go this way. A friend of mine has a Buddha statue on top of his bed-side drawer, with the logic that the first thing they will see in the morning is the Buddha and would remind them of the dhamma early in the morning. Well what can be more effective than this!

Offline ground

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Re: Where can I find a hollow Buddha statue?
« Reply #17 on: August 01, 2017, 03:54:12 am »
... It's sad to know what Tibetan Buddhism is promoting in the name of the Buddha.
Nevertheless Tibetan Buddhism is buddhism. And there is even practice simillar to tibetan buddhism in countries that are not tibetan but follow theravada buddhism.

And even theravada monasteries have statues and worship the buddha in front of these.

Well, that doesn't justify any of these practices.

What is justification?

It is just that you cannot blame people for doing what is common use in the buddhist world.

People in general need a god-like figure to rely upon and ways to make themselves feel like they did something to deserve the protection of that god-like figure; and so they eventually made a god out of the Buddha and invented ceremonies and rituals in Buddhism.

But two things are worth consideration: the Buddha always advised people to be an island to themselves; and even the Buddha himself took refuge in the Dhamma so I guess it makes sense to take the Dhamma as the ultimate thing to rely upon.

Please follow your idealized buddhism. I do not care. Neither do I care what other people do in the context of buddhism.

Offline Rahul

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Re: Where can I find a hollow Buddha statue?
« Reply #18 on: August 01, 2017, 08:54:34 pm »
... It's sad to know what Tibetan Buddhism is promoting in the name of the Buddha.
Nevertheless Tibetan Buddhism is buddhism. And there is even practice simillar to tibetan buddhism in countries that are not tibetan but follow theravada buddhism.

And even theravada monasteries have statues and worship the buddha in front of these.

Well, that doesn't justify any of these practices.

What is justification?

It is just that you cannot blame people for doing what is common use in the buddhist world.

People in general need a god-like figure to rely upon and ways to make themselves feel like they did something to deserve the protection of that god-like figure; and so they eventually made a god out of the Buddha and invented ceremonies and rituals in Buddhism.

But two things are worth consideration: the Buddha always advised people to be an island to themselves; and even the Buddha himself took refuge in the Dhamma so I guess it makes sense to take the Dhamma as the ultimate thing to rely upon.

Please follow your idealized buddhism. I do not care. Neither do I care what other people do in the context of buddhism.

I did not intend to get your feedback on my ideas of Buddhism, not did I seek your approval or care. But you are free to express your emotions here. Probably it just shows that you were hurt. It's ok to purge, ground. Satisfy your self, go ahead.

Offline ground

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Re: Where can I find a hollow Buddha statue?
« Reply #19 on: August 02, 2017, 02:37:36 am »
... It's sad to know what Tibetan Buddhism is promoting in the name of the Buddha.
Nevertheless Tibetan Buddhism is buddhism. And there is even practice simillar to tibetan buddhism in countries that are not tibetan but follow theravada buddhism.

And even theravada monasteries have statues and worship the buddha in front of these.

Well, that doesn't justify any of these practices.

What is justification?

It is just that you cannot blame people for doing what is common use in the buddhist world.

People in general need a god-like figure to rely upon and ways to make themselves feel like they did something to deserve the protection of that god-like figure; and so they eventually made a god out of the Buddha and invented ceremonies and rituals in Buddhism.

But two things are worth consideration: the Buddha always advised people to be an island to themselves; and even the Buddha himself took refuge in the Dhamma so I guess it makes sense to take the Dhamma as the ultimate thing to rely upon.

Please follow your idealized buddhism. I do not care. Neither do I care what other people do in the context of buddhism.

I did not intend to get your feedback on my ideas of Buddhism, not did I seek your approval or care. But you are free to express your emotions here. Probably it just shows that you were hurt. It's ok to purge, ground. Satisfy your self, go ahead.

What I am doing here is evoking inspirations in readers like you and expressing the inspirations caused by writers like you. That's the purpose of visiting this forum. Not more, not less.

What is inspiration? Inspiration is the arising of meanings through seeing words that are empty of meaning from the outset. This is what I call 'inspiration'.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2017, 02:40:42 am by ground »

Offline Rahul

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Re: Where can I find a hollow Buddha statue?
« Reply #20 on: August 02, 2017, 04:36:48 am »
... It's sad to know what Tibetan Buddhism is promoting in the name of the Buddha.
Nevertheless Tibetan Buddhism is buddhism. And there is even practice simillar to tibetan buddhism in countries that are not tibetan but follow theravada buddhism.

And even theravada monasteries have statues and worship the buddha in front of these.

Well, that doesn't justify any of these practices.

What is justification?

It is just that you cannot blame people for doing what is common use in the buddhist world.

People in general need a god-like figure to rely upon and ways to make themselves feel like they did something to deserve the protection of that god-like figure; and so they eventually made a god out of the Buddha and invented ceremonies and rituals in Buddhism.

But two things are worth consideration: the Buddha always advised people to be an island to themselves; and even the Buddha himself took refuge in the Dhamma so I guess it makes sense to take the Dhamma as the ultimate thing to rely upon.

Please follow your idealized buddhism. I do not care. Neither do I care what other people do in the context of buddhism.

I did not intend to get your feedback on my ideas of Buddhism, not did I seek your approval or care. But you are free to express your emotions here. Probably it just shows that you were hurt. It's ok to purge, ground. Satisfy your self, go ahead.

What I am doing here is evoking inspirations in readers like you and expressing the inspirations caused by writers like you. That's the purpose of visiting this forum. Not more, not less.

What is inspiration? Inspiration is the arising of meanings through seeing words that are empty of meaning from the outset. This is what I call 'inspiration'.

Consider that you are using the same set of words known as English vocabulary, which means all of your words are empty, too. You should subject yourself to your mission to 'evoke and express inspiration', too. Isn't it?

Offline ground

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Re: Where can I find a hollow Buddha statue?
« Reply #21 on: August 02, 2017, 08:00:50 pm »
... It's sad to know what Tibetan Buddhism is promoting in the name of the Buddha.
Nevertheless Tibetan Buddhism is buddhism. And there is even practice simillar to tibetan buddhism in countries that are not tibetan but follow theravada buddhism.

And even theravada monasteries have statues and worship the buddha in front of these.

Well, that doesn't justify any of these practices.

What is justification?

It is just that you cannot blame people for doing what is common use in the buddhist world.

People in general need a god-like figure to rely upon and ways to make themselves feel like they did something to deserve the protection of that god-like figure; and so they eventually made a god out of the Buddha and invented ceremonies and rituals in Buddhism.

But two things are worth consideration: the Buddha always advised people to be an island to themselves; and even the Buddha himself took refuge in the Dhamma so I guess it makes sense to take the Dhamma as the ultimate thing to rely upon.

Please follow your idealized buddhism. I do not care. Neither do I care what other people do in the context of buddhism.

I did not intend to get your feedback on my ideas of Buddhism, not did I seek your approval or care. But you are free to express your emotions here. Probably it just shows that you were hurt. It's ok to purge, ground. Satisfy your self, go ahead.

What I am doing here is evoking inspirations in readers like you and expressing the inspirations caused by writers like you. That's the purpose of visiting this forum. Not more, not less.

What is inspiration? Inspiration is the arising of meanings through seeing words that are empty of meaning from the outset. This is what I call 'inspiration'.

Consider that you are using the same set of words known as English vocabulary, which means all of your words are empty, too. You should subject yourself to your mission to 'evoke and express inspiration', too. Isn't it?
That is what I said, isn't it? My words are as empty as your words are empty and my words do inspire you as your words do inspire me. That interaction is called communication.

Offline The Artis Magistra

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Re: Where can I find a hollow Buddha statue?
« Reply #22 on: August 05, 2017, 06:10:41 pm »
... It's sad to know what Tibetan Buddhism is promoting in the name of the Buddha.
Nevertheless Tibetan Buddhism is buddhism. And there is even practice simillar to tibetan buddhism in countries that are not tibetan but follow theravada buddhism.

And even theravada monasteries have statues and worship the buddha in front of these.

Well, that doesn't justify any of these practices. People in general need a god-like figure to rely upon and ways to make themselves feel like they did something to deserve the protection of that god-like figure; and so they eventually made a god out of the Buddha and invented ceremonies and rituals in Buddhism.

But two things are worth consideration: the Buddha always advised people to be an island to themselves; and even the Buddha himself took refuge in the Dhamma so I guess it makes sense to take the Dhamma as the ultimate thing to rely upon.

Yeah but do you think "The Dhamma" refers to collections of sayings of the Buddha? Do you think it refers to what he himself said? Many generations of Buddhists did not consider the Dhamma to refer to words or collections of words.

Offline francis

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Re: Where can I find a hollow Buddha statue?
« Reply #23 on: August 06, 2017, 07:26:17 am »
The Artis Magistra,

Buddhist dharma refers to the Buddha’s sermons, as found in the Pali Canon.

What do you think it means?


"Enlightenment, for a wave in the ocean, is the moment the wave realises it is water." - Thich Nhat Hanh

Offline The Artis Magistra

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Re: Where can I find a hollow Buddha statue?
« Reply #24 on: August 06, 2017, 01:18:09 pm »
The Artis Magistra,

Buddhist dharma refers to the Buddha’s sermons, as found in the Pali Canon.

What do you think it means?

Great question. In those scriptures, which historically understood to be formulated after the death of Siddhartha Gautama, it appears that there is a notion of there being the Dharma before Siddhartha Gautama was even born, promulgated repeatedly in times past. After the death of Siddhartha Gautama, the notion arose that the Dharma was still active and re-emerging in others, even in far fetched places, lands, nations, worlds, and realms. The notion also seemed present during some periods that the Dharma is of cosmic relevance and is not limited to the transmission or activities of a certain group of human beings in jungles exclusively or where it spread from there. Thus, the words said to be those of Siddhartha Gautama may be and provide a good deal of insight into the Cosmically Significant Dharma of those claimed to be his predecessors and those claimed to be bringers of the Truth after his bodies demise.

So what the term means to me can be inclusive of the Pali Canon as well as other things which may be of use, relevance, or have emerged elsewhere but can at the very least be made to say similar things or point to similar things.


Offline francis

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Re: Where can I find a hollow Buddha statue?
« Reply #25 on: August 07, 2017, 05:29:24 am »
The Artis Magistra,

Buddhist dharma refers to the Buddha’s sermons, as found in the Pali Canon.

What do you think it means?

Great question. In those scriptures, which historically understood to be formulated after the death of Siddhartha Gautama, it appears that there is a notion of there being the Dharma before Siddhartha Gautama was even born, promulgated repeatedly in times past. After the death of Siddhartha Gautama, the notion arose that the Dharma was still active and re-emerging in others, even in far fetched places, lands, nations, worlds, and realms. The notion also seemed present during some periods that the Dharma is of cosmic relevance and is not limited to the transmission or activities of a certain group of human beings in jungles exclusively or where it spread from there. Thus, the words said to be those of Siddhartha Gautama may be and provide a good deal of insight into the Cosmically Significant Dharma of those claimed to be his predecessors and those claimed to be bringers of the Truth after his bodies demise.

So what the term means to me can be inclusive of the Pali Canon as well as other things which may be of use, relevance, or have emerged elsewhere but can at the very least be made to say similar things or point to similar things.

What I get here is ‘The Artis Magistra’ prefers to make up and follow his own views. Ok, fair enough, the Buddha’s teachings are not for everyone. Just don’t pretend your views reflect Buddhism. 
« Last Edit: August 07, 2017, 05:32:45 am by francis »
"Enlightenment, for a wave in the ocean, is the moment the wave realises it is water." - Thich Nhat Hanh

Offline The Artis Magistra

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Re: Where can I find a hollow Buddha statue?
« Reply #26 on: August 07, 2017, 10:06:51 am »
The Artis Magistra,

Buddhist dharma refers to the Buddha’s sermons, as found in the Pali Canon.

What do you think it means?

Great question. In those scriptures, which historically understood to be formulated after the death of Siddhartha Gautama, it appears that there is a notion of there being the Dharma before Siddhartha Gautama was even born, promulgated repeatedly in times past. After the death of Siddhartha Gautama, the notion arose that the Dharma was still active and re-emerging in others, even in far fetched places, lands, nations, worlds, and realms. The notion also seemed present during some periods that the Dharma is of cosmic relevance and is not limited to the transmission or activities of a certain group of human beings in jungles exclusively or where it spread from there. Thus, the words said to be those of Siddhartha Gautama may be and provide a good deal of insight into the Cosmically Significant Dharma of those claimed to be his predecessors and those claimed to be bringers of the Truth after his bodies demise.

So what the term means to me can be inclusive of the Pali Canon as well as other things which may be of use, relevance, or have emerged elsewhere but can at the very least be made to say similar things or point to similar things.

What I get here is ‘The Artis Magistra’ prefers to make up and follow his own views. Ok, fair enough, the Buddha’s teachings are not for everyone. Just don’t pretend your views reflect Buddhism.

Hi francis. They do actually reflect historical trends and ideas that have been considered and called Buddhist. It just might not be considered what you call Buddhist because you might have a narrow view of what can or should be included. Everything I say has made appearances or been implied in historical things which have been called Buddhist, it just might not be of the certain type you are familiar with or willing to accept. The ideas are not made up out of the blue nor do they lack Buddhist correspondences, but these are usually found among large schools like popular and cultural Buddhisms stemming from Northern and North Western Pakistan and India, the Mahayana and Tantric, Chinese and Japanese and things like that which were very large populations of people considered Buddhist, the majority even. The people many might consider "the only true Buddhists" in the jungles of South Eastern Asia as the Western people might interpret their ideas, are perhaps at this point different seeming from the sorts of things I talk about, which none-the-less were and are considered Buddhist, even the majority views, but may have differed from the "only true Buddhism" you know and practice.

 


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