Author Topic: Coincidence of Puja's and Solar Eclipses  (Read 197 times)

Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Coincidence of Puja's and Solar Eclipses
« on: August 19, 2017, 03:29:19 am »
After having researched "pujas" in general, and then Upasatha days, which coincide with full moons of a particular month associated with a particular Buddhist observation, and with the nexus of our upcoming solar eclipse,  I wondered if there were any specific Buddhist events which coincided with this type of astrological event.  So far, I have found nothing. 

Anyone aware of something I am not? :fu:

If so, would you please share.

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Dharma Data: Puja
    
The name given to the wide variety of devotional and offering ceremonies practiced in all Buddhist traditions. The word itself comes from the root meaning 'a flower' while pujas themselves probably developed from the custom of offering the Buddha flowers on his arrival in a particular place during his travels. The earliest pujas, still practiced in Theravada, consisted of placing flowers, lights and incense in front of a symbol or image of the Buddha.

The value of the practice is that it grows out of and reinforces faith and devotion which are considered positive emotions able to motivate and enhance one's practice of the Dhamma. In Mahayana pujas are often long and elaborate and in some cases believed to have a magical power. The Tantrayana has a wide variety of very elaborate pujas, some meant to be expressions of devotion others to induce wealth, long life, help from the gods and also spiritual qualities.

source:  http://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/dharmadata/fdd40.htm



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Uposatha Observance Days
© 2005
Uposatha days are times of renewed dedication to Dhamma practice, observed by lay followers and monastics throughout the world of Theravada Buddhism.

For monastics, these are often days of more intensive reflection and meditation. In many monasteries physical labor (construction projects, repairs, etc.) is curtailed. On New Moon and Full Moon days the fortnightly confession and recitation of the Bhikkhu Patimokkha (monastic rules of conduct) takes place.

Lay people observe the Eight Precepts on Uposatha days, as a support for meditation practice and as a way to re-energize commitment to the Dhamma. Whenever possible, lay people use these days as an opportunity to visit the local monastery, in order to make special offerings to the Sangha, to listen to Dhamma, and to practice meditation with Dhamma companions late into the night. For those not closely affiliated with a local monastery, it can simply be an opportunity to step up one's efforts in meditation, while drawing on the invisible support of millions of other practicing Buddhists around the world.

The calendar of Uposatha days is calculated using a complex traditional formula that is loosely based on the lunar calendar, with the result that the dates do not always coincide with the actual astronomical dates. To further complicate matters, each sect within Theravada Buddhism tends to follow a slightly different calendar.

Several full-moon Uposatha days hold special significance in the Buddhist calendar:

Magha Puja (usually in February)
This day, sometimes called "Sangha Day," commemorates the spontaneous assembly of 1,250 arahants in the Buddha's presence. One thousand of the gathered monks had previously achieved Awakening upon hearing the Buddha's delivery of the Fire Sermon; the remaining 250 were followers of the elder monks Ven. Moggallana and Ven. Sariputta. To mark this auspicious gathering, the Buddha delivered the "Ovada-Patimokkha Gatha" (see "A Chanting Guide"), a summary of the main points of the Dhamma, which the Buddha gave to the assembly before sending them out to proclaim the doctrine. [Suggested reading: "Dhamma for Everyone" by Ajaan Lee.]

Visakha Puja (Vesak) (usually in May)
This day, sometimes called "Buddha Day," commemorates three key events in the Buddha's life that took place on this full-moon day: his birth, Awakening, and final Unbinding (parinibbana). [Suggested reading: "Visakha Puja" by Ajaan Lee.]

Asalha Puja (usually in July)
This day, sometimes called "Dhamma Day," commemorates the Buddha's first discourse, which he gave to the group of five monks with whom he had practiced in the forest for many years. Upon hearing this discourse, one of the monks ( Ven. Kondañña) gained his first glimpse of Nibbana, thus giving birth to the Noble Sangha. The annual Rains retreat (vassa) begins the following day.

Pavarana Day (usually in October).
This day marks the end of the Rains retreat (vassa). In the following month, the kathina ceremony is held, during which the laity gather to make formal offerings of robe cloth and other requisites to the Sangha.

Anapanasati Day (usually in November).
At the end of one rains retreat (vassa), the Buddha was so pleased with the progress of the assembled monks that he encouraged them to extend their retreat for yet another month. On the full-moon day marking the end of that fourth month of retreat, he presented his instructions on mindfulness of breathing (anapanasati), which may be found in the Anapanasati Sutta (MN 118) — The Discourse on Mindfulness of Breathing.
See also:

Muluposatha Sutta (AN 3.70) — Discourse on the Roots of the Uposatha
Uposatha Sutta (AN 8.41) — Discourse on the Uposatha Observance
Visakhuposatha Sutta (AN 8.43) — Discourse to Visakha on the Uposatha
Sakka Sutta (AN 10.46) — To the Sakyans (on the Uposatha)
Ñanavara Thera's Questions-and-answers concerning the Uposatha.
Lay Buddhist Practice, by Bhikkhu Khantipalo (BPS Wheel Publication No. 206)


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Offline Samana Johann

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Re: Coincidence of Puja's and Solar Eclipses
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2017, 04:15:18 am »
Not that my person would be aware of. Special events like solar eclipse would accidentally happen. Of course such is good stuff for fortune-teller and other swindlermaking their livelyhood under the lable of the juwels and has of course kind of tradition in origin countries and one would find for sure a lot.

Nyom Ron could make a research but look after the past dates or even future. If needing some datas, my person had collected some for a research "which day really counts as Uposatha, according to the Buddha." An actually forgotten(?) and oft disputed topic. One can spend lifetimes and endless proccessors to calculate a scientific answer.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2017, 04:21:04 am by Samana Johann »
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Offline IdleChater

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Re: Coincidence of Puja's and Solar Eclipses
« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2017, 06:05:27 am »
Not that my person would be aware of. Special events like solar eclipse would accidentally happen.

An eclipse isn't an accident.  They are predicatble.

I was listening to a sory on NPR the other night and they offered that a total eclipse is always happening "somwhere".  What is rare is for a total eclipse to be observable on Earth. 

The ancients were able to predict the occurance of both lunar and solar eclipse.  One scientist was able to demonstrate how Stonehenge could be used to predict a visible eclipse.

In the case of Buddhist practice, Pujas and other practices are based on a lunar calendar - like what is called "Guru Rinpoche Day".  This is the 10th day of the waxing moon.  I don't know why, it just what it is. In my Sangha we perform the Kongchok Chidu sadhna - a Guru Rinpoche practice.  The Phases of the moon are observable every day regardless of location and don't go for decades before anyon an see them. 

I would imagine that an eclipse isn't at all important to the Buddhist practice calenar.  There are no practices for lunar eclipses and it would follow the same way.

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Nyom Ron could make a research but look after the past dates or even future.

How about this?  How about you stop this pretentious 3rd person language about people as if they weren't in the room,  referring to them a "nyom".  It's rude.  It's stupid.  Try using words like "you".  Everybody else does.  It works just fine.




Offline Samana Johann

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Re: Coincidence of Puja's and Solar Eclipses
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2017, 08:23:44 am »
Not that my person would be aware of. Special events like solar eclipse would accidentally happen.


An eclipse isn't an accident.  They are predicatble.


There is no reason, not even sientific callculation, that Pujas and special occations are in and relation with astronomy and aside of knowing the directions (which was the reason why the Buddha allowed, even told his monks, to learn about the stars, so that they would not be beaten by people thinking they are just fools who do not even know time and direction, at least, all means of astronomy and especial astrology and teaching such has been regarded as animal-art by the Buddha.) it can seems to be simply accident if such events and special occations in relation with Dhamma would fall on the same day. Now Buddha was born, got awakened, did his most outstanding teachings and ordered to keep the Uposatha, reached Paranibbana all on a "special" astrologic effent, or just days, that are most easy to be reminded and therfore "holly" and special since aniccent time even long before him?

The Buddha was himself not able to say when darkness will accure for one, but he told the reason why one comes to darkness and why to light: Tamonata Sutta: Darkness and when and how ones shines like moon or stars.

Does one know when the next possible eclipse appear and where to run to take part on it? Fullmoon is an event that happens for the whole earth at one time, easy to see, easy to calculate to do not fall out of certain rhythm.

What if moon eclipse happens, Nyom Idel?

The matter that good and useful does not taste and unuseful and bad is seen as tasty and preverent, does not make some to change to make others a favor. For such one needs to take refuge in a "Guru" to be later shocked again.

(Does Nyom be aware that he/she is adressed like the wise and ancient when having left house addressed and still adress their own mother and father? That good possible his here grandies and most ancestor and even till today million if not more people on tjis earth, good educated and members of high families use 3rd person as means of respect? That Nyom call that stupid, foolish and rude? What is foolish and respectless? What about the high regard for the anicent in this respect? Good to ask, learn and think, prove before praising and blame. Its not wise to follow ones ideas. And the is a topic already before causing other even to be killed because leading just off-topic and do also not careful read to OP discussion. Be careful of the "Guru" and the most worse are the own ideas, told not out of reason by the Buddha.)

So what about believing in stars and astrology? Looks fantastic and wothy to grasp?

Ones success in Dhamma is not predicatble, but depend on ones right effort, and the truth of cause and effect must be believed at first place. There is always a "from this comes that, with this, that arises".

It's not wise to grasp after unusefull stars and "stars" and even not compassionate to lead others to get busy with such, thought precious time can be fast lost in idle talk. Death can approach in the next minute even for young not to speak about young leading old to heedlessness and do not encourgae them in importand things for their benefit. The Buddhas use of the stars: The Moon and Sun Deity's Prayer for Protection (Canda Paritta)

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In Indian cosmology the major planets are regarded as deities or gods (not only in India, everywhere and today still more popular as any religion aside of it). This view, at times, extends to the common parlance of today, e.g., "rain god," "sun god," etc. The Buddha was not disposed to comment on these views, and so he contented himself with merely expressing the message of the Dhamma through the medium of these views.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2017, 09:10:35 am by Samana Johann »
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