Author Topic: Declaring Baha'i  (Read 608 times)

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: Declaring Baha'i
« Reply #30 on: September 10, 2017, 02:42:58 am »
I'm not going to find any "religion" that is going to match the meaningfulness of my personal prayer and meditation practice. So becoming Baha'i or Jewish or Mormon or whatever won't magically make me closer to God.

Probably not.  Maybe it's more about finding some like-minded people to share the journey with?  In any case I think it's fine to explore various spiritual traditions, and there is no need to rush into commitments.  I've explored a number of different paths over the years, including Hinduism ( Advaita ), Paganism and Quakerism.

Offline IdleChater

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Re: Declaring Baha'i
« Reply #31 on: September 10, 2017, 04:47:03 am »
...
I discerned I am not becoming Baha'i. ...
:lmfao:

Best you get rid of your obsession with religions which actually means getting rid of beliefs. Getting rid of beliefs is liberation. :fu:

Well, when you get rid of yours ........

Offline ZenFred

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Re: Declaring Baha'i
« Reply #32 on: September 10, 2017, 07:18:17 am »
.

Well, when you get rid of yours ........

Haha! Well getting rid of delusion is like shoveling falling snow, is it?  That what Jundo (Soto Zen teacher) said.

Actually this is a really good question. Is it even possible to worship God without delusion (in Buddhist language) or without vain imagings (Baha'i) or idolatry (Judeo-Christian) or without making any partners of Him (Islamic) or without claiming to possess Him (Paul Tillich)? All these ways of speaking are asking the same question.
Perhaps my old teacher Dharmakara is right. There are no Buddhists. The first things is not identify with religious labels or theological constructs. Then embrace not-knowing in our own practice.

Offline Samana Johann

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Re: Declaring Baha'i
« Reply #33 on: September 10, 2017, 07:53:44 am »
Or simply the Brahma-Viharas, since at Buddhas time the Brahmans acctually did not really know where this certain palace is and how to reach.

Quote
The Sublime Attitudes: A Study Guide on the Brahmaviharas
by Ṭhānissaro Bhikkhu.



The sublime attitudes (brahmaviharas) are the Buddha’s primary heart teachings—the ones that connect most directly with our desire for true happiness. They’re the qualities of heart that motivated the Buddha to find awakening and then to teach the path of awakening to others. At the same time, they function as part of the path itself.

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Offline IdleChater

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Re: Declaring Baha'i
« Reply #34 on: September 10, 2017, 02:56:05 pm »
Haha! Well getting rid of delusion is like shoveling falling snow, is it?  That what Jundo (Soto Zen teacher) said.

Well, shoveling snow and talking about it are two different things.

I lived in Northern Minnesota for for 35 years.  In that time, I learned a lot about snow.  Then I moved to Colorado where I learned even more.  I suspect I've forotten more about snow than most people around here know.

To shovel snow you have to go out there and actully do some shoveling.  You can talk about it all day long, but until you actually go out there and grab a shovel, nothing get's done.

What we have is someone who talks a lot but hasn't got anything done.  He talks incessantly about beliefs, and being liberated.  The truth is, he has as many beliefs as anyone else around here.

Offline ZenFred

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Re: Declaring Baha'i
« Reply #35 on: September 10, 2017, 03:52:53 pm »
Okay, so according to Buddhism if I cling to my attachments to theism and prayer but live a life practing compassion and contemplation, then I gain good karma. The I that is the thinking, believing self is not reincarnated but my efforts towards enlightenment/liberation improves my karma and advances progress towards liberation of all sentient beings, right?
It doesn't really help or is needed to try to dissuade my of my delusions. I may have practiced Zen but it obviously didn't stick. Yet it did increase my compassion and reduce my suffering.
What do you all think?

Offline Dharma Flower

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Re: Declaring Baha'i
« Reply #36 on: September 10, 2017, 10:07:41 pm »
I love the Pure Land texts (and general Mahayana as well). The visualization sutra and the medicine Buddha sutra are two of my favorites!!


You and I have had a similar problem, a feeling like there's something "missing" in Buddhism that a theistic god can fill.


Have you explored Hinduism as a path?  It's basically Buddhism plus Atman and Brahman.


What about Mahayana Buddhism, with Buddha-nature and Dharmakaya?

According to The Avatamsaka Sutra, the Dharma-body is embodied in all bodies, not just the bodies of buddhas:

Quote
The Dharmakaya, though manifesting itself in the triple world, is free from impurities and desires. It unfolds itself here, there and everywhere responding to the call of karma. It is not an individual reality, it is not a false existence, but is universal and pure. It comes from nowhere, it goes to nowhere; it does not assert itself, nor is it subject to annihilation. It is forever serene and eternal. It is the One, devoid of all determinations. This body of Dharma has no boundary, no quarters, but is embodied in all bodies. Its freedom or spontaneity is incomprehensible, its spiritual presence in things corporeal is incomprehensible. All forms of corporeality are involved therein, it is able to create all things. Assuming any concrete material body as required by the nature and condition of karma, it illuminates all creations. Though it is the treasure of intelligence, it is void of particularity. There is no place in the universe where this Body does not prevail. The universe becomes but this Body forever remains. It is free from all opposites and contraries, yet it is working in all things to lead them to Nirvana.
http://www.nembutsu.info/absolute2.htm


Perhaps the most well-known sutra example of the Dharmakaya is the Eternal Buddha of the Lotus Sutra:

Quote
In chapter fifteen we are told how a vast multitude of bodhisattvas spring up from the earth in a miraculous manner in order that they may undertake the task of transmitting and protecting the teachings of the Buddha. When the Buddha is asked who these bodhisattvas are, he replies that they are persons whom he has taught and guided to enlightenment. His questioner quite naturally asks how Shakyamuni could possibly have taught and converted such immeasurable multitudes in the course of only forty years of preaching.

In chapter sixteen Shakyamuni reveals the answer to this riddle. The Buddha, he says, is an eternal being, ever present in the world, ever concerned for the salvation of all beings. He attained buddhahood an incalculably distant time in the past, and has never ceased to abide in the world since then. He seems at times to pass away into nirvana, and at other times to make a new appearance in the world. But he does this only so that living beings will not take his presence for granted and be slack in their quest for enlightenment. His seeming disappearance is no more than an expedient means that he employs to encourage them in their efforts, one of many such expedients that he adopts in order to fit his teachings to the different natures and capacities of individual beings and insure that those teachings will have relevance for all. From this we see that in the Lotus Sutra the Buddha, who had earlier been viewed as a historical personality, is now conceived as a being who transcends all boundaries of time and space, an ever-abiding principle of truth and compassion that exists everywhere and within all beings.
https://books.google.com/books?id=t9s7D0mIt44C&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

« Last Edit: September 10, 2017, 10:09:57 pm by Dharma Flower »

Offline Dharma Flower

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Re: Declaring Baha'i
« Reply #37 on: September 10, 2017, 10:08:49 pm »
Okay, so according to Buddhism if I cling to my attachments to theism and prayer but live a life practing compassion and contemplation, then I gain good karma. The I that is the thinking, believing self is not reincarnated but my efforts towards enlightenment/liberation improves my karma and advances progress towards liberation of all sentient beings, right?
It doesn't really help or is needed to try to dissuade my of my delusions. I may have practiced Zen but it obviously didn't stick. Yet it did increase my compassion and reduce my suffering.
What do you all think?

If you feel the need for prayer, why not recite the name of Amida or Guanyin, if it's that spiritual connection you are seeking?

Offline ground

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Re: Declaring Baha'i
« Reply #38 on: September 10, 2017, 11:20:11 pm »
Okay, so according to Buddhism if I cling to my attachments to theism and prayer but live a life practing compassion and contemplation, then I gain good karma. The I that is the thinking, believing self is not reincarnated but my efforts towards enlightenment/liberation improves my karma and advances progress towards liberation of all sentient beings, right?
It doesn't really help or is needed to try to dissuade my of my delusions. I may have practiced Zen but it obviously didn't stick. Yet it did increase my compassion and reduce my suffering.
What do you all think?
you are obsessed with religions.
Both, practicing buddhism or Zen and practicing theism, are bondage.  :fu:

But then, this bondage may be beneficial for those who seek busyness in oder to escape the emptiness of teleological and teleonomical meaning of life and death. But since this escape is only temporary this benefit is harmful. However considering death this harm is only temporary too. So in the end practicing this or practicing that or not practicing anything at all make no difference because all are just expressions of conscious life which is temporary. :om:
« Last Edit: September 10, 2017, 11:39:48 pm by ground »

 


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