Author Topic: Looking for Buddhist apologetics  (Read 1308 times)

Offline John the Rupert

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Looking for Buddhist apologetics
« on: August 13, 2015, 07:39:26 am »
I understand that apologetics might run counter-intuitive of Buddhist philosophy but is there any articles or books out there on why Buddhism is true? You know, like debating why the creation story in the Judeo-Christian tradition isn't sound, etc.
Don't waste your mind on nursery rhymes
Or fairy tales of blood and wine
It's turtles all the way down the line
So to each their own til' we go home
To other realms our souls must roam
To and through the myth that we all call space and time

Offline Dharmakara

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Re: Looking for Buddhist apologetics
« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2015, 12:54:32 pm »
"I like nonsense. It wakes up the brain cells".  -- Dr. Suess

Offline efaine

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Re: Looking for Buddhist apologetics
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2015, 08:06:31 am »
Science makes it pretty clear that Judeo-Christian creation myth is not correct. Even the Catholic Church doesn't interpret it literally anymore. And from a Buddhist point of view it is not important to think about that kind of things. According to the Majjhima Nikaya Buddha said:

"Suppose someone was hit by a poisoned arrow and his friends and relatives found a doctor able to remove the arrow. If this man were to say, 'I will not have this arrow taken out until I know whether the person who had shot it was a priest, a prince or a merchant, his name and his family. I will not have it taken out until I know what kind of bow was used and whether the arrowhead was an ordinary one or an iron one.' That person would die before all these things are ever known to him."

The truth of Buddhism can be experienced first-hand when you find that the Buddhist practise will relieve (your) suffering, increase your compassion and make you a happier human being. And that is the yardstick you should use to measure all religions. Christianity has overall the same goal but weaker means to achieve it. But a "good" Christian will still accumulate more merits than a "bad" Buddhist.

And Thich Nhat Hanh has an image of Christ on his altar as he considers Jesus a role model of compassion.

Offline NoEssentialNature

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Re: Looking for Buddhist apologetics
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2016, 11:59:39 pm »
I understand that apologetics might run counter-intuitive of Buddhist philosophy but is there any articles or books out there on why Buddhism is true? You know, like debating why the creation story in the Judeo-Christian tradition isn't sound, etc.

Basically it's not metaphysics, so no.

You could argue that a Buddhist equivalent is expressed in texts like the Kalama Sutra, a description of the benefits of Buddhism for non-Buddhists, which is to say those who do not accept the aspects of Buddhist practice which require faith in the teaching and in enlightenment. Even here though, the aspects requiring faith are expected to be able to be directly experienced by some, those who attain awakening.

Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: Looking for Buddhist apologetics
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2016, 05:42:30 am »
Quote
I understand that apologetics might run counter-intuitive of Buddhist philosophy but is there any articles or books out there on why Buddhism is true? You know, like debating why the creation story in the Judeo-Christian tradition isn't sound, etc.


In The Kalama Sutta Buddha advises that as Buddhists we have no obligation to accept by faith any teaching by anyone, no matter how presented, or in what format.  Instead, it is we who have the obligation and responsibility to test and validate all teachings and pronouncements for ourselves.  It is we, through our practice, who must verify and validate his teachings through our individual practices.

Resource for further study:  http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/soma/wheel008.html
What Makes an Elder? :
A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

 


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