Author Topic: Adventure Time!  (Read 232 times)

Offline CedarTree

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Adventure Time!
« on: September 04, 2017, 12:45:56 pm »
Some things have recently happened that have given me the insight of how I will probably feel when I am on my death bed dying Lol

And I have decided that truly what lays at the heart of my life and meaning is finding out "What the heck is going on here!" :tongue:

I am planning to check out places like Gyobutsuji Zen Monastery & Sanshin Zen Community both of which are in America for Zen practice.

For Theravada most likely continue with Ajahn Chah places but maybe take in a Mahasi or Pa Auk associated center or do the big trip to Burma! Who knows!

Maybe even check out the famous Chogyal Namkhai Norbu!

All in all I wanted to thank the great community here. I may be back some day! But for now I really want to get to the heart of it all as I know that's where it is for me.

Be well everyone! :namaste:

Offline Samana Johann

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Re: Adventure Time!
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2017, 09:53:47 pm »
Mudita and may CedarTree find his/her teacher able to tame him/here so that after having received the true Dhamma, he/she is able to make suffering, birth, aging, sickness and death for him/her self an end. May CedarTree be soon on other Arahat and a unexcelld field of merits for this dark world.

Quote
from: http://zugangzureinsicht.org/html/lib/study/into_the_stream_en.html#listening

The Canon's treatment of these factors touches on questions of interest to all meditators, regardless of whether their practice aims all the way to Awakening: How can you recognize a trustworthy teacher? How can you tell the true Dhamma from counterfeit Dhamma? What are the rewards that come from listening to the Dhamma? Which questions should you ask yourself in the course of the practice? What kind of practice qualifies as being in accordance with the Dhamma? What kind of qualities do you need to develop to benefit most from your practice?

For your practice to lead to Awakening, you must develop reliable standards for answering these questions. The Buddha offers some preliminary guidance on developing these standards in his instructions to the brahman teenager, Kapadika Bharadvaja.


[Kapadika Bharadvaja:] "To what extent is there an awakening to the truth? To what extent does one awaken to the truth? We ask Master Gotama about awakening to the truth."

[The Buddha:] "There is the case, Bharadvaja, where a monk lives in dependence on a certain village or town. Then a householder or householder's son goes to him and observes him with regard to three mental qualities — qualities based on greed, qualities based on aversion, qualities based on delusion: 'Are there in this venerable one any such qualities based on greed that, with his mind overcome by these qualities, he might say, "I know," while not knowing, or say, "I see," while not seeing; or that he might urge another to act in a way that was for his/her long-term harm & pain?' As he observes him, he comes to know, 'There are in this venerable one no such qualities based on greed... His bodily behavior & verbal behavior are those of one not greedy. And the Dhamma he teaches is deep, hard to see, hard to realize, tranquil, refined, beyond the scope of conjecture, subtle, to-be-experienced by the wise. This Dhamma can't easily be taught by a person who's greedy.

"When, on observing that the monk is purified with regard to qualities based on greed, he next observes him with regard to qualities based on aversion... based on delusion: 'Are there in this venerable one any such qualities based on delusion that, with his mind overcome by these qualities, he might say, "I know," while not knowing, or say, "I see," while not seeing; or that he might urge another to act in a way that was for his/her long-term harm & pain?' As he observes him, he comes to know, 'There are in this venerable one no such qualities based on delusion... His bodily behavior & verbal behavior are those of one not deluded. And the Dhamma he teaches is deep, hard to see, hard to realize, tranquil, refined, beyond the scope of conjecture, subtle, to-be-experienced by the wise. This Dhamma can't easily be taught by a person who's deluded.

"When, on observing that the monk is purified with regard to qualities based on delusion, he places conviction in him. With the arising of conviction, he visits him & grows close to him. Growing close to him, he lends ear. Lending ear, he hears the Dhamma. Hearing the Dhamma, he remembers it. Remembering it, he penetrates the meaning of those dhammas. Penetrating the meaning, he comes to an agreement through pondering those dhammas. There being an agreement through pondering those dhammas, desire arises. With the arising of desire, he becomes willing. Willing, he contemplates [lit: "weighs," "compares"]. Contemplating, he makes an exertion. Exerting himself, he both realizes the ultimate meaning of the truth with his body and sees by penetrating it with discernment.

"To this extent, Bharadvaja, there is an awakening to the truth. To this extent one awakens to the truth. I describe this as an awakening to the truth. But it is not yet the final attainment of the truth."

[Kapadika Bharadvaja:] "Yes, Master Gotama, to this extent there is an awakening to the truth. To this extent one awakens to the truth. We regard this as an awakening to the truth. But to what extent is there the final attainment of the truth? To what extent does one finally attain the truth? We ask Master Gotama about the final attainment of the truth."

[Buddha:] "The cultivation, development, & pursuit of those very same qualities: to this extent, Bharadvaja, there is the final attainment of the truth. To this extent one finally attains the truth. I describe this as the final attainment of the truth."

— MN 95



Go there and settle, where ever people regard right view: generosity, respect, going forth, joy with others gain and delight in faith. Less places and people are left in this world... go, don't wait, their is no future in this enviroment one can join without having any merits.
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Offline jimsouth

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Re: Adventure Time!
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2017, 08:52:33 am »
I am considering a trip to Puma Punku in Bolivia. Done a lot of traveling; but now older & hopefully wiser. There was a time I had a backpack at the ready, and would jump at any & every opportunity. Blind faith when younger; and probably took risks I shouldn't have. Haven't done much traveling these past 15 or so years; but I am still haunted by what's still out there that I haven't experienced.

Offline IdleChater

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Re: Adventure Time!
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2017, 03:34:00 pm »
I want to go to Bodhgaya.

After I found out about the cancer, it occurred to me that a pilgrimage to Bodhgaya, where the Sidhartha became the Buddha, would have to be at the top of my bucket list.  However, my wife tells me that I have to take to Egypt, first.  :jinsyx:

 


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