Author Topic: American buddhism and children  (Read 760 times)

Offline whale

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American buddhism and children
« on: June 20, 2016, 01:32:28 pm »
I have not been to a real Sangha in over 9 year.  This is also the same time my children were born.  This is because there really is no center, sangha or temple in my city that is child friendly.   My christian neighbor's church seem to center around family and children. They have drop offs,  day cares and  school programs and even summer camps.   I still practice but alone without a Sangha.  as I look back when I did attended  there were only two types of people at the centers and Sanghas;  Young people before they had kids and older people who never had kids or kids were all grown.   I wounder if this is a symptom of an lager issue with Americana Buddhism.  its seem to have a narrow base, and unintentionally exclusionary.  almost monastic without laypeople.   How can there be a community or future without children?

Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: American buddhism and children
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2016, 04:38:34 pm »
Hi, Whale:

Firstly, as a now deceased friend of mine used to say, "If you want friends, you must be a friend."  So in the case of making the Buddhist community more friendly to children, you need to get out there and make child beneficial services available to them by volunteering your personal assistance to others withe children.

In local Boy Scout Troop we used to lock parents in a room and not allow them to leave until all volunteer functions were filled.  "No dropping kids off and then leaving."...such as was the case when I was a kid. (over sixty years ago)   :wink1:

The last issue which needs to be addressed is to do background investigations for all volunteers.  Pedophiles are attracted to such positions as troop leaders, teachers, and etc.  I know this is a hard subject to broach, but Jew, Christian, or Buddhist it is one that needs to be addressed for the safety of your children.


That pretty much sums it up for me.

 :dharma:  Ron
What Makes an Elder? :
A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

Offline whale

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Re: American buddhism and children
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2016, 08:00:44 pm »
its not that I would want a drop off, but there doesn't seem to be any family in the community.  If anyone had kids in my old sanga, they were all grown.   

Offline Brinal1

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Re: American buddhism and children
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2016, 04:46:29 pm »
I'm pretty late with my response but someone used this argument to debate with me. She said "why kind of 'religion' does not allow children to attend?" I had no answer. All I could say was that I will teach my child what I know until he is old enough to attend and understand.

Offline whale

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Re: American buddhism and children
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2016, 06:49:06 pm »
They have a point ,  There is no sangha for our children in western countries.   Yoga studios are more accommodating. 

 


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