Author Topic: differing perspectives on mental ilness and Buddhism  (Read 9021 times)

Offline Joka

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Re: differing perspectives on mental ilness and Buddhism
« Reply #15 on: March 14, 2017, 10:41:36 am »
Then there is the extreme skeptical point of view that either mental illness isn't real and that even if it was technically all of humanity would fit criteria of being mentally ill in one form or another.

The topic of mental illness has always bothered me in that it seems to be a contrived diagnosis by the prevailing elite power structure on those that don't conform to their rule or leadership.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2017, 10:45:05 am by Joka »

Offline stillpointdancer

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Re: differing perspectives on mental ilness and Buddhism
« Reply #16 on: March 15, 2017, 03:56:03 am »
Then there is the extreme skeptical point of view that either mental illness isn't real and that even if it was technically all of humanity would fit criteria of being mentally ill in one form or another.

The topic of mental illness has always bothered me in that it seems to be a contrived diagnosis by the prevailing elite power structure on those that don't conform to their rule or leadership.
It's an area I have been studying for a while now. We are in the business of changing brains using meditation and the path, so we need to understand what goes on. I think there are different problems, to be tackled in different ways. There are problems with chemical imbalances, infection, and so on. There are problems with 'leakage' from one area of the brain to another. Problems when extreme stuff happens to us, or when we deliberately put extreme stuff into our systems.

We need to bring understanding and compassion, especially to a forum like this where people read posts, without posting themselves. There needs to be some awareness of where Buddhism can help, and where it has to step aside to allow specialist help deal with the situation. Having said that, it's pretty clear to me that Buddhist practices like mindfulness have become an established part of stress reduction and behavioral therapy. They can be seen as a 'cure' for the harm that society does to us by the demands it makes on us to be part of it in terms of our behavior and understanding of the world. It's probably the 'success story' of bringing aspects of Buddhist practice to the West.

What do others think? Is this a discussion to have here?
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Offline openmind

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Re: differing perspectives on mental ilness and Buddhism
« Reply #17 on: March 15, 2017, 05:56:29 am »
After the older monk died who founded the Monastery, who was my dearest spiritual friend, I had a nervous breakdown. I was trained to the point that I could function ok, and do my work, but my body was in shock. I asked several of my closest spiritual friends about what they thought was happening. Many of them said that it could be physical problem and I should see a doctor. I did and was prescribed medication to change my bodies chemistry. It worked, and I was able to to start living much more openly. Then I find out that my mothers mother went insane, my mom was a neurotic human, and both my bothers were on similar medication. I have no regrets or am not judgemental about  taking medication if it helps relieve suffering.

Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: differing perspectives on mental ilness and Buddhism
« Reply #18 on: March 20, 2017, 06:29:00 am »
Thanks for sharing your experience, Openmind. 

Very glad that you had a positive experience with the medical community regarding your illness.  :hug:

I could relate to your experience in that my mother also had many bouts with mental illness, dealing with it almost her entire life.  Near the end of her life, which wasn't very long compared to modern life-spans  (death @ age 60) they found that she had a thyroid problem, hypo-thyroidism, which had never been diagnosed.  She went on Thyroxin to treat the deficiency and all of her problems with mental illness vanished till the end of her life. 

Modern medicine understands a great deal more today than what they did forty years ago.  In this way at least, we are fortunate to be alive in this age. :dharma:
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-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

Offline lobsang~gazom

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Re: differing perspectives on mental ilness and Buddhism
« Reply #19 on: March 26, 2017, 07:46:06 am »
I've bipolar 1 disorder and social anxiety disorder and my buddhist practice has helped me alot. I still take medication and it's very important for someone with my disorder to do so but my doctor's and psychologists are very approving of my buddhist practice and meditation and agree it has helped me to "manage" my condition. I've even had discussions with my teacher Rinpoche about my illness and he always encouraged medication and medical professional help along side my practice. I think it's important to have a balance.

Offline lobsang~gazom

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Re: differing perspectives on mental ilness and Buddhism
« Reply #20 on: March 26, 2017, 08:00:38 am »
 :r4wheel:
« Last Edit: March 27, 2017, 01:49:02 am by lobsang~gazom »

Offline Rosalina

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Re: differing perspectives on mental ilness and Buddhism
« Reply #21 on: June 30, 2017, 04:25:17 am »
Buddhism does help with mental illness though.

Offline loopix

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Re: differing perspectives on mental ilness and Buddhism
« Reply #22 on: November 10, 2017, 04:06:42 am »
ok, so I have a question nobody has been able to give me a proper answer on, not even high lamas....


How do you tell the differene between actual spiritual experiences and ablities, and mental health problems?
The symptoms are very often, if not always, pretty much the same. "There is a fine line between clarvoyance and schizophrenia" one famous "psychic" said once, But how do you tell the difference??


Anyone?

Offline IdleChater

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Re: differing perspectives on mental ilness and Buddhism
« Reply #23 on: November 10, 2017, 04:19:31 am »
ok, so I have a question nobody has been able to give me a proper answer on, not even high lamas....


How do you tell the differene between actual spiritual experiences and ablities, and mental health problems?
The symptoms are very often, if not always, pretty much the same. "There is a fine line between clarvoyance and schizophrenia" one famous "psychic" said once, But how do you tell the difference??


Anyone?

Depending on your POV,  there may not be any difference.  That fine line may not exist at all. 

Offline loopix

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Re: differing perspectives on mental ilness and Buddhism
« Reply #24 on: November 10, 2017, 04:33:57 am »
exactly, so how does western psychiatry - where a often dualistic and materialistic mindset sets a diagnosis - and pumps a patient full of drugs and insists the patient is delusional, know the difference between an actual delusion and, say, an actual spirtitual event?


The symptoms, again, are very often, if not all the time, the same. So how does western psyichiatry define, if they even consider it a possibility, "real" spiritual experiences? How do they differentiate / discriminate between a delusion, and a real event? Except through their own material and physical understanding of the mind, and in a few lucky (depnends, huh? lol) cases, their own faith?

This is something I'm working to get a satisfying answer on... i wont clucking go away until I have it and shove it in the psychiatric feild's faces :wacky:

as you can guess, I have seen and experienced some fairly wild shit... hah!

Offline loopix

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Re: differing perspectives on mental ilness and Buddhism
« Reply #25 on: November 10, 2017, 04:35:00 am »
..and pardon my french.  ;D

 


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