Author Topic: unconditional love  (Read 1049 times)

Offline Antonio1986

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unconditional love
« on: November 14, 2015, 02:28:29 pm »
Two questions.
Buddhism is against "unconditional love" because is associated with attachment, which is consequently associated with suffering? 
Buddhsim is also against the philosophy: "If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, you should turn to them the other cheek" as.

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Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: unconditional love
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2016, 02:46:39 pm »
Quote
Buddhism is against "unconditional love" because is associated with attachment, which is consequently associated with suffering?


First, there is Buddha's teachings as reflected in The Suttas and in The Precepts:

In The Four Noble truths Buddha taught that there is a cause to suffering:  desire, clinging, lusting, addiction, which can also be called "attachment".

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/ptf/dhamma/sacca/

Buddha went on to explain that everything arises from underlying causes, which are themselves impermanent.  Therefore, when the underlying cause corrupts, deteriorates, ceases to exist  then what it caused will also corrupt, deteriorate, and cease to exist.  Clinging to it will only cause dissatisfaction as it is ripped from our futile grasp.

See "dependent origination":  http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/dn/dn.15.0.than.html

Loving - kindness can be expressed without attachment.  The same is true for compassion.  It is best for one to also develop mental equanimity concurrently so as to not become attached when the object of our focus is harmed or intends harm, which might cause loss of equanimity, resulting in waning of unconditional love on our part.  One is advised to maintain great compassion for all those who intend and cause harm, because they are reserving a time and place for themselves in the hell realms. :bigtears:

Buddha discussed and recommended four such states of mind for us in The Brahma Viharas:  http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/nyanaponika/wheel006.html

Quote
"If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, you should turn to them the other cheek" as.
  This is also a Christian concept, a teaching of Jesus The Christ.

 Buddha advised that violence leads only to more violence, but most importantly to the hell realms.  However we are allowed to defend ourselves, knowing that if we choose to do so violently, the violence will persist.  Buddha advised that it is better to run away and hide than to be violent, or if there is no escape, it is better to allow terrible harm to one's self than to react violently for the reasons previously stated as he teaches in The Kakacupama Sutta:

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.021x.than.html
« Last Edit: February 01, 2016, 03:10:55 pm by Ron-the-Elder »
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