Author Topic: Prostrations  (Read 11287 times)

Offline lowonthetotem

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Prostrations
« on: February 17, 2010, 08:43:14 am »
Recently, I've had to take a break from running because of some illness.  I've not run in quite a while, so before I get back into it, I wanted to do some prepatory exercises to avoid injury (I've lost a great deal of muscle from not being able to eat or keep what I eat in me for long).  I was going over in my mind different weight lifting exercises, although I don't really enjoy going to the gym much, too much meatheadery going on for my tastes.  Then I remembered how I used to do prostrations each morning.  I am not really sure why I ever stopped, but decided to start again this morning.  I picked up my mala and went through 108 prostrations.  It was a good workout for me in my unconditioned state.

I wondered if anyone else does prostrations.  Most likely you do them more for devotional reasons than exercise, but they are indeed an excellent exercise.  People who are overweight should probably be careful getting up and down off the floor, as the deeper the knee bends past 90 degrees, the greater the sheering force that is created on the ACL and PCL.  But, it is good functional training.  We should all try to be functional enough to get up and down from the floor.  It is one of those basic things that comes in handy in life.

This morning I prostrated myself to the Triple Jewel in refuge and to all beings in servitude alternately.  I used to go through a litany of teachers, Buddhas, and Bodhisattvas, but I wanted to simplify it.  Maybe there are more appropriate beings to recall during prostrations?

Offline santamonicacj

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Re: Prostrations
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2010, 07:45:23 pm »
A swimmer's lap counter is much more convenient than a mala or hand mala.

http://www.tallycounterstore.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=009

Scroll down to see # E-6. It is worn on your finger like a big ring.

Also for sissies a slightly raised prostration board is the cheater's way. It makes it 50% easier physically.
Warning: I'm enough of a fundamentalist Tibet style Buddhist to believe that for the last 1,000 years Tibet has produced a handful of enlightened masters in every generation. I do not ask that YOU believe it, but it will greatly simplify conversations if you understand that about me. Thanks.

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Re: Prostrations
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2010, 01:40:23 am »
The hand and wrist malas (27 and 21 beads) were supposedly invented so that you could use them while prostrating without them touching the ground.

However, almost anything esle is likely to be more convenient.  I even know a guy who uses an abacus.

For fitness, prostrations are an excellent workout.

I remember my Aikido fitness was largely gained through a similar process of repeatedly getting up.

There is some research, which I can't remember in detail, which asserted that old people who habitually sit on the floor have far fewer falls and injuries than those who use chairs.  I imagine that if people continue prostration into old age it must be very good for their strength and mobility.


Offline Caz

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Re: Prostrations
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2010, 10:13:30 am »
The hand and wrist malas (27 and 21 beads) were supposedly invented so that you could use them while prostrating without them touching the ground.

However, almost anything esle is likely to be more convenient.  I even know a guy who uses an abacus.

For fitness, prostrations are an excellent workout.

I remember my Aikido fitness was largely gained through a similar process of repeatedly getting up.

There is some research, which I can't remember in detail, which asserted that old people who habitually sit on the floor have far fewer falls and injuries than those who use chairs.  I imagine that if people continue prostration into old age it must be very good for their strength and mobility.



Gen-la Kyhenrab once said that its all the exercise you could need :)
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Re: Prostrations
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2010, 10:23:30 am »
The hand and wrist malas (27 and 21 beads) were supposedly invented so that you could use them while prostrating without them touching the ground.

However, almost anything esle is likely to be more convenient.  I even know a guy who uses an abacus.

For fitness, prostrations are an excellent workout.

I remember my Aikido fitness was largely gained through a similar process of repeatedly getting up.

There is some research, which I can't remember in detail, which asserted that old people who habitually sit on the floor have far fewer falls and injuries than those who use chairs.  I imagine that if people continue prostration into old age it must be very good for their strength and mobility.



Gen-la Kyhenrab once said that its all the exercise you could need :)

Yeah, they're all the same in the NKT.

But why do they shout, 'Get down and gimme 20!'  before every puja!  LOL:)

Offline dhammaseeker51

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Re: Prostrations
« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2010, 11:41:36 am »
You could always chant "May all beings be fit and happy"  ;D

with Metta   :anjali:

Offline gregkavarnos

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Prostrations
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2010, 02:50:17 am »
When I started prostrations (as part of ngondro) I stopped all other forms of exercise:  I am a muay thai teacher and now I make my top students take the majority of the classes, I am also a cyclist but the knees can't do both prostrations and cycling, and a (sea) swimmer but it's winter right now (I don't see myself giving up swimming though).

I must say that I have noticed no perceivable change in my fitness and strength levels.  Actually, initially (and though I am really fit) I really struggled to complete a set of 108 prostrations!

They are definitely as good for the body as they are for the mind!
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Offline Caz

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Re: Prostrations
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2010, 11:01:32 am »
The hand and wrist malas (27 and 21 beads) were supposedly invented so that you could use them while prostrating without them touching the ground.

However, almost anything esle is likely to be more convenient.  I even know a guy who uses an abacus.

For fitness, prostrations are an excellent workout.

I remember my Aikido fitness was largely gained through a similar process of repeatedly getting up.

There is some research, which I can't remember in detail, which asserted that old people who habitually sit on the floor have far fewer falls and injuries than those who use chairs.  I imagine that if people continue prostration into old age it must be very good for their strength and mobility.



Gen-la Kyhenrab once said that its all the exercise you could need :)

Yeah, they're all the same in the NKT.

But why do they shout, 'Get down and gimme 20!'  before every puja!  LOL:)

Prostrations are good fun why before Dear Cynthia died ( she was well into her 90's ) She was doing at least a set of 10 in the morning and evening. They create the cause to acheive the form body of a Buddha no wonder why she lived a very long time.  :pray:
http://emodernbuddhism.com/

This eBook Modern Buddhism – The Path of Compassion and Wisdom, in three volumes, is being distributed freely at the request of the author Geshe Kelsang Gyatso. The author says: "Through reading and practicing the instructions given in this book, people can solve their daily problems and maintain a happy mind all the time." So that these benefits can pervade the whole world, Geshe Kelsang wishes to give this eBook freely to everyone.

We would like to request you to please respect this precious Dharma book, which functions to free living beings from suffering permanently. If you continually read and practice the advice in this book, eventually your problems caused by anger, attachment and ignorance will cease.

Please enjoy this special gift from Geshe Kelsang Gyatso, who dedicates: "May everyone who reads this book experience deep peace of mind, and accomplish the real meaning of human life."

GoGet

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Re: Prostrations
« Reply #8 on: March 19, 2010, 03:32:07 pm »
A swimmer's lap counter is much more convenient than a mala or hand mala.

http://www.tallycounterstore.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=009

Scroll down to see # E-6. It is worn on your finger like a big ring.

Also for sissies a slightly raised prostration board is the cheater's way. It makes it 50% easier physically.


There was a poster over on the old e-Sangha boards who was using a hand-held tally counter for Ngondro prostrations.  He was even thinking about having his guru bless the thing.

Offline gregkavarnos

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Re: Prostrations
« Reply #9 on: March 25, 2010, 02:42:39 am »
I also use a hand held tally counter.  It is soooooo.... much easier to use than a mala.

I haven't considered getting it blessed though!  :D
 :namaste:
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Offline t

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Re: Prostrations
« Reply #10 on: March 25, 2010, 02:45:25 am »
Quote
I also use a hand held tally counter.  It is soooooo.... much easier to use than a mala.

I haven't considered getting it blessed though!  :D
 :namaste:
'Bout time...  :lmfao:

GoGet

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Re: Prostrations
« Reply #11 on: March 25, 2010, 08:56:11 am »
I also use a hand held tally counter.  It is soooooo.... much easier to use than a mala.

I haven't considered getting it blessed though!  :D
 :namaste:

I don't see why you couldn't have it blessed if that's what you wanted to do with it.

When you get right down to it, a Mala is just a simple counting device, not unlike a tally counter.

I've considered what to use when I start my Ngondro practice in the near future.  Using a Mala might be more of a distraction - hitting the floor, hitting the face, etc..  A tally counter, while not having the coolness factor or aesthetic of a traditional tool such as a mala, is an obvious and effective alternative.

I'll be meeting with my Lama pretty soon and I'll ask him what he thinks about tally counters and blessing them.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2010, 09:00:58 am by GoGet »

Offline heybai

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Re: Prostrations
« Reply #12 on: May 31, 2011, 08:51:42 am »
Here are some examples -- in order of Tibetan, Chan, Tibetan

Buddhism: Prostrations


Buddhism: Prostrations Part II


How to do prostrations in Chinese Buddhism - front view
 

How to do full prostration.

 


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