Author Topic: Thoughts about non-judgement  (Read 1785 times)

Offline ZenFred

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Thoughts about non-judgement
« on: February 13, 2014, 05:15:56 pm »
I was thinking about the importance of practicing non-judgement. Perhaps I will make this a "teaching" if I ever become a Zen Master hahaha, I hope that never happens!!

Suppose a greedy car-salesman who has several customers looking to buy an expensive car. Would he say "No I won't sell this car to a homosexual person" or to a black person or to a divorced person or to a practicing Wiccan or to a communist? Of course not, he'd sell them the car. And he would do so with no compassion or love of that person, simply from a realization that everyone's money is just as good as everyone else's money. Shouldn't therefore be even more the case that those of us seeking to practice compassion also show no partiality, since even a compassionless person can do that. We are imperfect human beings of course and don't always demonstrate the compassion we should. But what of God, Buddha-nature, the Universe? Would it love less than the car salesman? Of course not!!

Offline andyebarnes67

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Re: Thoughts about non-judgement
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2014, 05:29:20 pm »
It would be convenient if we could go through life without having to exercise judgement, but to my mind, the reality is not like this.
Consider another scenario.
A bus veers off the road into a deep river.
There are many people of all ages on the bus who can't swim but there is just one life-saver ring by the side of the river where the accident occurs.
Who do you through the ring to?
you have to make a judgement.

Metta

Andy Barnes
My comments are by nature, subjective interpretations from my mind. As such, they are never wrong, They are as they are. They are never right, They are as they are.

Offline ZenFred

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Re: Thoughts about non-judgement
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2014, 05:41:07 pm »
Hahaha.. a classic ethical philosophical question. I suppose a Buddhist response is that you have to pick at random because everyone has the same nature and there is only the present.  What would you do?

Offline Tara

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Re: Thoughts about non-judgement
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2014, 05:59:42 pm »
I was thinking about the importance of practicing non-judgement. Perhaps I will make this a "teaching" if I ever become a Zen Master hahaha, I hope that never happens!!

Suppose a greedy car-salesman who has several customers looking to buy an expensive car. Would he say "No I won't sell this car to a homosexual person" or to a black person or to a divorced person or to a practicing Wiccan or to a communist? Of course not, he'd sell them the car. And he would do so with no compassion or love of that person, simply from a realization that everyone's money is just as good as everyone else's money. Shouldn't therefore be even more the case that those of us seeking to practice compassion also show no partiality, since even a compassionless person can do that. We are imperfect human beings of course and don't always demonstrate the compassion we should. But what of God, Buddha-nature, the Universe? Would it love less than the car salesman? Of course not!!

 :eek:  Weren't you just posting a thread about how those with mental illnesses shouldn't ask people for advice on this forum (or take it for that matter)?


Offline ZenFred

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Re: Thoughts about non-judgement
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2014, 06:08:30 pm »

Offline andyebarnes67

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Re: Thoughts about non-judgement
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2014, 07:47:29 pm »
Hahaha.. a classic ethical philosophical question. I suppose a Buddhist response is that you have to pick at random because everyone has the same nature and there is only the present.  What would you do?
Trying to picture myself in that situation, I think I would probably throw it to a child, and therin lies my point. I would have then made a judgement as to the value of a child's life being worth more than that of someone else.
Natural? yes
Ethical? yes
Buddhist? this is that ..... :cheesy:
Metta

Andy Barnes
My comments are by nature, subjective interpretations from my mind. As such, they are never wrong, They are as they are. They are never right, They are as they are.

Offline francis

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Re: Thoughts about non-judgement
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2014, 12:21:10 am »
It would be convenient if we could go through life without having to exercise judgement, but to my mind, the reality is not like this.
Consider another scenario.
A bus veers off the road into a deep river.
There are many people of all ages on the bus who can't swim but there is just one life-saver ring by the side of the river where the accident occurs.
Who do you through the ring to?
you have to make a judgement.

Interesting hypothetical, but isn't is more about learning not to judging other people, which we tend to do on a minute by minute basis. 
« Last Edit: February 14, 2014, 03:02:24 am by francis »
"Enlightenment, for a wave in the ocean, is the moment the wave realises it is water." - Thich Nhat Hanh

Offline francis

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Re: Thoughts about non-judgement
« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2014, 08:40:12 pm »
By way of clarification for the hypothetical, it’s possible that someone, well practised in Buddhism, would “just do it”, that is give the life-saver ring to a person without going through the judgement process.
"Enlightenment, for a wave in the ocean, is the moment the wave realises it is water." - Thich Nhat Hanh

 


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