Author Topic: "The Buddha taught a terrible lesson..."  (Read 582 times)

Offline Tiberius

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"The Buddha taught a terrible lesson..."
« on: July 21, 2016, 05:49:48 pm »
There is a commentary of the Dharma in which someone once said, "The Buddha taught a terrible lesson, that we must lose all that we love most and hold dear." I disagree that it is what we now would call "terrible." And I think the author knew the glimour of this alternative meaning. That it is shocking rather than a terrible lesson. Buddhist philosophy may one day dominate the secular world as a moral guide and practice, it is a very likely choice for the future. But our lessons are still leaving people with mouths agape as they are introduced to deeper practice.

My purpose in this post, did Buddha mean when he taught the impermanence of all things to include limbs of a living body, the ability to walk or write without assistance, abnormalities of the brain that go beyond mental affliction, rare disease presentations one may be the first recorded example of in medical history. In other words, did he mean even the passing away of the body and brain while the mind sits trapped inside it while they deteriorate. Yes some of these words are laced with suffering. I have suffered since the age of 3 and now am nearly 29. It started with emotional pain from neglect and abuse then abandonment at 5, then the beginning of 22 years of constant physical pain at 7. In Zen we don't talk much about Karma and Reincarnation so I don't know if they're nonsectarian concepts, but if they exist what could I have done in a past life to deserve the suffering I try to process and move beyond everyday, yet never can because there's so much and yet more coming all the time. In 1-2 years time I'll likely have lost both arms, and it will take approximately 3 years to get back any significant function to type with bionic nerve conductive titanium protheses.

But I'd also like to note without Buddhism and the strength of the Three Refuges...Buddha, Dharma, Sangha...I wouldn't be alive today. Thank you to anyone with the time and compassion to answer this message.

With Love,

Tiberius

Offline ECS

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Re: "The Buddha taught a terrible lesson..."
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2016, 05:09:07 pm »
In my current mind , as one awaken to Buddhism , he realize he is emotion , he is desire / love / hate / anger / worry / fear /greed / ego etc so he realize that he is constantly in a natural process into the original state of nothingness ...so in short , he realize he is naturally travelling into freedom of emotion .....as he awaken to this realization , he no longer hold on to the mind ....... he realize by holding on to desire , love , anger etc is just like trying to stop a moving train by his leg therefore is great suffering to resist this natural process of Buddhism ......as he awaken to this , he realize is suffering holding on to the mind of desire / love / anger / fear etc .............and as he travel into this path , all emotion regardless anger or love will naturally be forgotten and decreases ....as emotion decreases , the burden is lessen and he will be more at ease .......as he continue this path , all emotion will gradually and naturally forgotten into a condition of no emotion and further into a state freedom of condition ... a state of nothingness - The Buddha.

Offline stillpointdancer

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Re: "The Buddha taught a terrible lesson..."
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2016, 03:29:11 am »

My purpose in this post, did Buddha mean when he taught the impermanence of all things to include limbs of a living body, the ability to walk or write without assistance, abnormalities of the brain that go beyond mental affliction, rare disease presentations one may be the first recorded example of in medical history. In other words, did he mean even the passing away of the body and brain while the mind sits trapped inside it while they deteriorate.
With Love,
Tiberius
Thank you Tiberius for having the time and compassion to share your message. If the Buddha has given your life meaning, then that's a powerful teaching for everyone. There are two kinds of message in Buddhism. One is of the spiritual suffering that only enlightenment can alleviate, and the other is of the physical suffering, which comes with being alive and aware. If we aren't suffering physically now, we soon will be. Any of us could find ourselves in a wheelchair, or bedridden, or worse, at any time, so the experiences of others are essential spurs to encouraging us to practice while we can, while there is still time. Whatever our physical condition.
Thank you again for reminding me why I practice.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Offline DavidM843

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Re: "The Buddha taught a terrible lesson..."
« Reply #3 on: August 18, 2016, 04:39:51 pm »
Part of my daily practice includes the Five Recollections.  They are:

I am of the nature to decay.  I have not gone beyond decay.
I am of the nature to be sick.  I have not gone beyond sickness.
I am of the nature to die.  I have not gone beyond death.
All that is mine, dear and delightful, will change and disappear.
I am the owner of my karma, born of my karma, related to my karma, abide supported by my karma.  All that I do creates karma and I will surely inherit that karma.

When I've told others about the recollections, especially new or non Buddhists, they usually tell me that they're morbid, or nihilist.  Quite the contrary.  They are a reminder of life's realities and keeping them mind helps me to works towards equanimity and compassion.

Offline stillpointdancer

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Re: "The Buddha taught a terrible lesson..."
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2016, 03:36:48 am »
There is a commentary of the Dharma in which someone once said, "The Buddha taught a terrible lesson, that we must lose all that we love most and hold dear." I disagree that it is what we now would call "terrible." And I think the author knew the glimour of this alternative meaning. That it is shocking rather than a terrible lesson. Buddhist philosophy may one day dominate the secular world as a moral guide and practice, it is a very likely choice for the future. But our lessons are still leaving people with mouths agape as they are introduced to deeper practice.
With Love,
Tiberius

If that's what he said then he was wrong, though I suspect a mistranslation or something taken out of context. What it should read is that 'we must let go of all that we love most and hold dear'. Not the same thing at all. If you let go of everything, even nothing, then you get to the truth of everything. You then get back all that you have let go of, but in a different way, a better way than the one that you thought you had originally.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

 


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