Author Topic: A passage in the book "The Buddha Speaks"  (Read 696 times)

Offline Tirisilex

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A passage in the book "The Buddha Speaks"
« on: January 08, 2016, 09:25:32 pm »
On pages 36 - 38 of the book "The Buddha Speaks." I'm having a hard time knowing what the Buddha is saying on this topic. I'm having a real hard time with this one..

Magandiya asked the Buddha: "What is your view and what is your way of life and your future destiny?" The Buddha answered: "Studying all the opinions that people hold fast to, I do not say, 'I declare this' or 'I declare that.' Observing all human opinions but not grasping them, I searched for the truth and found inward peace."
"But how would a wise person describe the inward peace you found without referring to one of the speculative systems, without taking up one of the human opinions you would not grasp?"
"One does not attain peace by speculation, tradition, knowledge, ritual, or viewpoint, but nor is it attained without the help of any of those. It is by taking those factors as a means and not grasping them as an ends in themselves that one finds peace and clarity."
"But if you say that clarity is not to be attained with tradition and viewpoint and yet is not attained by absence of these," persisted Magandiya, "then it seems to me that what you are talking about is nonsense. Most people think that clarity comes from a viewpoint."
"It is because of your own fixed viewpoint that you keep on asking these questions," replied the Buddha, "You are obsessed with your preconceived notions and are holding on to them fast. I don't believe you've heard anything I've said; thats why regard it as nonsense. You are looking for some superiority. But there are no such thoughts of superior or equal or inferior to one who has found clarity, because to think in that way is immediately to enter into disputation. Why should the wise person argue, saying 'This is truth' or 'This is a lie'? And if he has no such thoughts as equal or unequal, who is he going to dispute with?
"The one who wanders independent in the world, free from opinions and viewpoints, does not grasp them and enter into disputations and arguments. As the lotus rises on its stalk unsoiled by the mud and the water, so the wise one speaks of peace and is unstained by the opinions of the world."

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: A passage in the book "The Buddha Speaks"
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2016, 02:00:54 am »
"The one who wanders independent in the world, free from opinions and viewpoints, does not grasp them and enter into disputations and arguments. As the lotus rises on its stalk unsoiled by the mud and the water, so the wise one speaks of peace and is unstained by the opinions of the world."


I think it's observing that opinions are just opinions, and beliefs are just beliefs.  And the more of them you have the less likely you are to see clearly what is actually happening.  It's reminiscent of "don't know mind" in Zen.  Also I recall Ajahn Chah spoke about uncertainty.
http://www.azquotes.com/author/17674-Ajahn_Chah/tag/certainty
« Last Edit: January 09, 2016, 02:23:21 am by Spiny Norman »

Offline Tirisilex

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Re: A passage in the book "The Buddha Speaks"
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2016, 01:48:55 pm »
LOL..

 R U Evil? Do you want 1 Billion Dollars?..

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: A passage in the book "The Buddha Speaks"
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2016, 12:11:26 am »
Do you want 1 Billion Dollars?..

Are you offering?   :wink1:

 


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