Author Topic: Christmas Dharma  (Read 1876 times)

thornbush

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Christmas Dharma
« on: December 01, 2009, 07:21:08 pm »

Offline humanitas

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Re: Christmas Dharma
« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2009, 08:56:59 pm »
*sigh* If I was caught under the Mistletoe with Lama Yeshe I'd give him a holiday kiss!  Nothing too exciting, just a peck on the cheek!  I just like him that much.
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Chokyi Wangpo

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Re: Christmas Dharma
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2009, 11:05:57 pm »
I find it very easy to think of Jesus as a Bodhisattva.  Also kissing Lama Yeshe might be difficult, because he passed away in 1984.

Offline humanitas

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Re: Christmas Dharma
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2009, 09:30:59 pm »
I'm sure he'll be back some time somewhere.  And I meant it hypothetically like if I was under the mistletoe with Jesus, I'd prolly give him a festive smacker on the cheek too... :elf:
« Last Edit: December 14, 2009, 05:59:16 pm by 0gyen Chodzom »
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TMingyur

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Re: Christmas Dharma
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2009, 10:32:31 pm »
Christmas Dharma

Lama Yeshe, one of the greatest beings ever
 :bow:

But honestly ... why was he such a great being?

Because he followed the right teachings!

 :namaste:
« Last Edit: December 13, 2009, 10:35:19 pm by TMingyur »

Drang

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Re: Christmas Dharma
« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2009, 09:18:40 am »
Christmas Dharma

Lama Yeshe, one of the greatest beings ever
 :bow:

But honestly ... why was he such a great being?

Because he followed the right teachings!

 :namaste:


He was a great being, clearly non-sectarian.   :namaste:

The Dalai Lama's "Advice to Buddhists in the West":

 "I would like to insist upon the importance of non-sectarianism. It sometimes happens that people attribute an exaggerated importance to one or another of the different schools and different traditions within Buddhism, and this can lead to an accumulation of extremely negative acts with regard to the Dharma. The advantage of non-sectarianism is that after receiving the transmission of the instructions, initiations, and explanations pertinent to each different tradition, we will be able to have a better understanding of the different teachings. From my own experience, this is without doubt very beneficial. Consequently, if we keep a non-sectarian attitude, as we receive teachings from different traditions, think about them, and put them in practice, it is certain we will improve our understanding of the Dharma. This is why non-sectarianism is so important.

Traditionally in Tibet there have been two approaches used by the many great scholars and accomplished masters. Indeed, while some concentrated on the study and practice of their own tradition, their own spiritual heritage, others expanded the field of their study and their practice of Buddhism from a non-sectarian point of view. This tradition already existed in Tibet among the great masters, and I think that today this non-sectarianism is extremely important and is the best Tibetan custom to follow."


 :buddha:


"Dzogchen, the Self-Perfected State" – by Chögyal Namkhai Norbu:

"All the various types of teachings and spiritual paths are related to the different capacities of understanding that different individual have. There those not exist, from an absolute point of view, any teaching which is more perfect or effective then another. A teachings value lies solely in the inner awakening, which an individual can arrive at through it. If a person benefits from a given teaching, for that person that teaching is the supreme path, because it is suited to his or her nature and capacity. There’s no sense in trying to judge it as more or less elevated in relation to other paths to realization."
 :dharma:

« Last Edit: December 24, 2009, 09:22:49 am by Drang »

TMingyur

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Re: Christmas Dharma
« Reply #6 on: December 24, 2009, 10:43:16 am »
Christmas Dharma

Lama Yeshe, one of the greatest beings ever
 :bow:

But honestly ... why was he such a great being?

Because he followed the right teachings!

 :namaste:


He was a great being, clearly non-sectarian.   :namaste:


Yes, of course.

He followed the right teachings since he followed the buddhist teachings and not the christian teachings. That put him in the position to teach "christmas dharma".

Kind regards
« Last Edit: December 24, 2009, 10:49:23 am by TMingyur »

Drang

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Re: Christmas Dharma
« Reply #7 on: December 24, 2009, 11:11:49 am »
Respecting other traditions:
.

 :buddha:  :dharma:"When we contemplate the diversity of spiritual traditions on this planet we can understand that each addresses the specific needs of different human beings, because there is so much diversity in human mentality and spiritual inclination. Yet, fundamentally, all spiritual traditions perform the same function, which is to help us tame our mental state, overcome our negativities and perfect our inner potential."

--from Lighting the Way by the Dalai Lama, translated by Geshe Thupten Jinpa, published by Snow Lion Publications


His Holiness the Dalai Lama has said that it is wonderful that so many different religions exist in the world. Just as one food will not appeal to everybody, one religion or one set of beliefs will not satisfy everyone's needs. Therefore, it is extremely beneficial that a variety of different religions is available from which to choose. He welcomes and rejoices at this.

 :buddha: :dharma:
"While pointing out the fundamental similarities between world religions, I do not advocate one particular religion at the expense of all others, nor do I seek a new 'world religion'. All the different religions of the world are needed to enrich human experience and world civilization.

Our human minds, being of different calibre and disposition, need different approaches to peace and happiness.

Thus, the point is clear: humanity needs all the world's religions to suit the ways of life, diverse spiritual needs, and inherited national traditions of individual human beings.

It is from this perspective that I welcome efforts being made in various parts of the world for better understanding among religions.

The need for this is particularly urgent now.

If all religions make the betterment of humanity their main concern, then they can easily work together in harmony for world peace. Interfaith understanding will bring about the unity necessary for all religions to work together. However, although this is indeed an important step, we must remember that there are no quick or easy solutions. We cannot hide the doctrinal differences that exist among various faiths, nor can we hope to replace the existing religions by a new universal belief. Each religion has its own distinctive contributions to make, and each in its own way is suitable to a particular group of people as they understand life. The world needs them all."

His Holiness the Dalai Lama - A Human Approach to World Peace.

 :bow:

TMingyur

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Re: Christmas Dharma
« Reply #8 on: December 24, 2009, 11:16:51 am »
Respecting other traditions:
...
As buddhist one respects other traditions.

But why have you taken refuge to buddha, dharma and sangha?

Have you taken refuge to buddha, dharma and sangha because you consider the christian teachings to be the right teachings?

Of course the buddhist teachings are the right teachings.

Now does that necessarily entail that as buddhist one does not respect other religions?

No, of course not!


If all religions make the betterment of humanity their main concern, then they can easily work together in harmony for world peace.
...
His Holiness the Dalai Lama - A Human Approach to World Peace.
That may be, but other religions do not lead to liberation. That is why the buddhist teachings are the right teachings.

Kind regards
« Last Edit: December 24, 2009, 11:28:51 am by TMingyur »

 


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