Author Topic: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana  (Read 18771 times)

Offline songhill

  • Member
  • Posts: 794
    • View Profile
    • The Zennist
Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #105 on: May 15, 2013, 12:48:35 pm »
Some even believe that there is neither suffering nor a way out  :wink1:
If there is no seeing then belief arises, yes.  :fu:

So what do you see?

Offline ground

  • Member
  • Posts: 2030
    • View Profile
Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #106 on: May 15, 2013, 01:15:00 pm »
Some even believe that there is neither suffering nor a way out  :wink1:
If there is no seeing then belief arises, yes.  :fu:

So what do you see?

I does not see, if sense of "I do see" arises there is no seeing but there has arisen belief. :fu:

Offline former monk john

  • Member
  • Posts: 977
  • My teacher and I in 1995
    • View Profile
Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #107 on: May 15, 2013, 02:11:04 pm »
In all my years of going to temples Therevada aqnd Mahayana, this is exactly the kind of confusing talk I never heard from Monks explaining Dharma to lay people, what exactly are you trying to prove, that you understand something that is not understandable, Its seems that there's this air of superiority associated with making statements that don't really make outward sense, If you really understand these difficult topics, wouldn't you be able to express them in simple terms that we could all understand, Just my opinion.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2013, 02:13:30 pm by former monk john »
to me, the signs of a successful practice are happiness and a cessation of suffering, buddhism often gives me this; not all the answers.

Offline ground

  • Member
  • Posts: 2030
    • View Profile
Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #108 on: May 15, 2013, 08:57:02 pm »
In all my years of going to temples Therevada aqnd Mahayana, this is exactly the kind of confusing talk I never heard from Monks explaining Dharma to lay people, ...
A musician makes music, a painter paints paintings. Do you visit a painter if you want to hear music and complain that he does not play music?

what exactly are you trying to prove,
Nothing.  Why are you visiting a painter if you want to hear music?

... Its seems that there's this air of superiority associated with making statements that don't really make outward sense, ...
It may be that there is a feeling of inferiority associated with making such statements. 

If you really understand these difficult topics, wouldn't you be able to express them in simple terms that we could all understand, ...
1. How many are you?
2. If words used would meet your expectations would this then appear to you as "in simple terms"? If so it is best you are applying the words you are expecting yourself and do not expect others to apply the words you would apply.

Just my opinion.
The number of opinions is without limit.


Now ... referring to the topic of this thread ... "What is the common ground between your words and mine?"

:fu:
« Last Edit: May 15, 2013, 09:02:03 pm by ground »

Offline former monk john

  • Member
  • Posts: 977
  • My teacher and I in 1995
    • View Profile
Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #109 on: May 15, 2013, 10:39:57 pm »
Case in point......
to me, the signs of a successful practice are happiness and a cessation of suffering, buddhism often gives me this; not all the answers.

Offline ground

  • Member
  • Posts: 2030
    • View Profile
Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #110 on: May 15, 2013, 10:45:03 pm »
Sun shines, flowers grow.  :fu:

Offline Spiny Norman

  • Member
  • Posts: 5083
  • Cool baby yeah!
    • View Profile
Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #111 on: May 16, 2013, 02:29:30 am »

Offline ground

  • Member
  • Posts: 2030
    • View Profile
Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #112 on: May 16, 2013, 10:24:56 am »
Human creativity shines, religious beliefs grow. We have found the common ground. :fu:

Offline Ron-the-Elder

  • Member
  • Posts: 4475
  • May all beings live rightly and harmoniously.
    • View Profile
Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #113 on: September 25, 2013, 02:56:07 pm »
So far, over the last few years since 1963 (50 years, give or take a few months) I have found the following in common between Theravada and Mahayana (perhaps not all Mahayana, but most):

I.  The Buddha was enlightened.
II.  The Buddha had many previous lives.
III. The Buddha taught:
A.  The Four Noble Truths
 1. Which included The Fact of Dukkha
 2.  The cause of dukkha
  3.  That there was a means of eliminating dukkha.
 4.  That means was The Noble Eight Fold Path.
B.  Dependent Origination
C.  Kamma / Karma
D.  Impermanence
E.  Emptiness
F.  Rebirth
G.  The 31 Planes of Existence within the 31 Realms.
H.  The Khandas / Skandas
I.  The aggregates
J.  Meditation
K.  Mindfulness
L.  The Five Basic Precepts
M.  The Six Sense Doors
N.  Mara (The Tempter / The Lord of Delusion / The King of Death)
O.  Rebirth
P.  Nibbana / Nirvana
Q.  Study of Documents written about The Buddha ( Suttas / Sutras )
R.  Celebration of Puja's / Buddhist Holidays.
S.  The coming of the next Buddha  (Maitreyah)
T.  Chanting

That's it for me off the top of my head.
What Makes an Elder? :
A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

Offline sakko

  • Member
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #114 on: December 21, 2013, 04:32:22 am »
Hi,
there is acertain common amount of buddhist teaching. The measure are the 8 Jhanas. In Theravade only the sixth have to be reached: Nibbanam. Nuber 7 and 8 are left to the other
directions of buddhism. Number seven is called : Borderline of possible perception and the 8th Jhana is: Dissolving of all perceptions.

sakko

Offline Dharmakara

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4233
    • View Profile
Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #115 on: December 21, 2013, 10:31:50 am »
Not correct. The Anguttara Nikaya (AN 9.36) of the Pali Canon actually lists nine jhanas:

1. Delightful Sensations
2. Joy
3. Contentment
4. Utter peacefulness
5. Infinity of space
6. Infinity of consciousness
7. No-thingness
8. Neither perception nor non-perception
9. Cessation

For anyone interested in reading more, Dhammawiki has an excellent description of each jhana:

http://www.dhammawiki.com/index.php?title=9_Jhanas

Offline pudgala2

  • Member
  • Posts: 44
    • View Profile
Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #116 on: December 21, 2013, 01:30:11 pm »
Theravada is the bone
Mahayana is the flesh
Zen is the
Spirit
in
The Bdhisattva Vow


pudgala2

Poetic justice—deserving to be the karmic character you habitually practice being—until YOU stop it.


Offline sakko

  • Member
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #117 on: December 22, 2013, 04:18:52 am »
Hello,
yes there is a common ground between Theravada and Mahayana. My thing is the Pali-Canon and there is a measure in how far both sides agree.
The Theravadas declare the 6th Jhana as the end. In Pali-Canon the are 8 Jhanas.

sakko

Offline Dharmakara

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4233
    • View Profile
Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #118 on: December 22, 2013, 06:06:04 am »
The Buddha describes eight and nine jhanas in the Pali Canon, the number depending on the particular sutta being examined.

As for what Theravada practitioners "declare" and what they don't "declare", a wise man wouldn't make a blanket statement as you have, first and foremost because you certainly do not speak for all Theravada practitioners --- there are more than a few dedicated Theravada practitioners who would actually disagree with you, including David Snyder.

The issue surrounding the number of jhanas recognized within the Theravada tradition is really no different than the number of paramitas recognized within the Mahayana tradition, whether it should be six or ten paramitas --- for example, I prefer the ten paramitas as expounded upon within the Avatamsaka Sutra.

Offline andyebarnes67

  • Member
  • Posts: 29
  • Traveler. Paths are made by walking
    • View Profile
Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #119 on: January 19, 2014, 05:32:16 am »
I think the analogy of the clay pot can just easily be applied to the Theravada/Mahayana as it can to the individual.
No matter the present (Past or future) form of the pot, the clay remains the same.
It may be useful also to remember that in the original schism of the Sangha, it was simply a matter of disagreement about some of the vinaya rules. All else simply followed as the two sides evolved separately.
Metta

Andy Barnes
My comments are by nature, subjective interpretations from my mind. As such, they are never wrong, They are as they are. They are never right, They are as they are.

 


SimplePortal 2.3.3 © 2008-2010, SimplePortal