Author Topic: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana  (Read 44976 times)

Offline Sonam

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Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #75 on: July 16, 2011, 04:32:12 pm »
May I suggest a possibility for common ground?  Vajrayana explains rebirth as a process in which the "very subtle mind" (distinguishing between the gross mind, the subtle mind, and the very subtle mind) separates from the body at death, then enters the bardo to eventually find a rebirth.  Some Theravadans have said that the "very subtle mind" can be equated with the alaya vijnana, which carries over to a future rebirth. Can anyone add to this? Is there agreement on this point, or disagreement? Thank you.

Offline Karma Dondrup Tashi

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Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #76 on: July 19, 2011, 06:56:14 am »
I am surprised it is a concept which appears in Theravada I thought it originated with Yogacara Buddhism.
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Offline Dharmakara

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Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #77 on: July 19, 2011, 11:33:00 am »
Sonam, I've come across that a few times during discussions, because the alaya consists of all the seeds resulting from action, ect., though it's not something you hear a lot of Theravada practitioners speaking about. If I recall correctly, there were one or two postings at the New Buddhist Forum.

Offline Monkey Mind

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Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #78 on: July 19, 2011, 01:22:23 pm »
I'd forgotten about this thread... A couple of weeks ago I had an opportunity to meet with Ajahn Pasano, Thai Forest monk and abbot of the Abhayagiri Monestary in California. My current practice is in the Goenka/ U Ba Khin tradition, and I meet regularly with a Zen monk. Another person in this small group has an active Vajrayana practice. And there was a guy with a Japanese Pure Land practice. And some followers of a non-sectarian Western Buddhist movement. And a Dharma Punk. Come to think of it, no one in this small group represented the Thai Forest sect, except Ven. Pasano himself and three monks from his monastery. And once again, congruent with all of my "real world" Buddhist experiences, sect and tradition did not matter very much. The woman with the Vajrayana practice did not throw blood or spit at the Ajahn, the Pure Land guy did not storm out in a huff. Instead we had a very enthusiastic discussion about the Dharma/ Dhamma. Am I wrong in asserting (again) that this stuff only matters to Internet Buddhists?

Offline Dharmakara

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Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #79 on: July 19, 2011, 05:11:35 pm »
I know what you mean, though it's proabably due to a lack of a physical relationship with an actually community in general, sometimes referred to as "arm-chair Buddhists".

That's not to say that the perception of discord is unwarranted in some instances, but this has more to do with spats between competing teachers than anything fundamental to any particular branch of the Buddhist tradition. A good example is the nonsense between a few of Japanese teachers in Los Angeles during the early 1930's, almost comical in nature when examined today.


Offline daimond

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Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #80 on: May 26, 2012, 06:09:13 pm »
in the culapsthanka story in jataka athakata.

Member of sangha have a tendency to divide themself ;one part member of sangha think more intelegent and more knowing than other part member of sangha, cause of that he expeled the other part member of sangha from sangha.

But Buddha come and speak cause you came and be member of sangha in the Buddhq there no one capable expell you (even if it true your are not clever, intelegent and do not have greatknowledge)

Buddha speak to laypeople in culapathanka story in jataka athakata to always invite and wait both member of sangha who have diffrent understanding  without discrimination, even one side would expeled and no admited other member of sangha.

Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #81 on: June 17, 2012, 06:07:11 pm »
May I suggest a possibility for common ground?  Vajrayana explains rebirth as a process in which the "very subtle mind" (distinguishing between the gross mind, the subtle mind, and the very subtle mind) separates from the body at death, then enters the bardo to eventually find a rebirth.  Some Theravadans have said that the "very subtle mind" can be equated with the alaya vijnana, which carries over to a future rebirth. Can anyone add to this? Is there agreement on this point, or disagreement? Thank you.
Myunderstanding from The Suttas:  Buddha taught that only karmic effects move on after death.  No portion of mind, subtle or otherwise moves on after death.  Otherwise this would purport a permanent entity, such as a soul or entity which is contrary to Buddha's teachings.
What Makes an Elder? :
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But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

Offline Dairy Lama

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Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #82 on: June 19, 2012, 02:20:05 am »
Somebody asked me recently what the various Buddhist traditions had in common, and I said "The Four Noble Truths".  But was that a good answer? :wink1:
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Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #83 on: June 19, 2012, 04:25:14 am »
Somebody asked me recently what the various Buddhist traditions had in common, and I said "The Four Noble Truths".  But was that a good answer? :wink1:

That's a very cynical attitude.

Offline truemoves

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Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #84 on: June 19, 2012, 09:03:31 am »
I'd like to express my gratitude to everyone from all traditions for their efforts and sharing of their insights and traditions.
Perhaps a few essential commonalities are the pursuit of wisdom and good will for all beings. Two things that can be valued in any tradition, Buddhist or otherwise. Thank you all for you good intentions.

Best wishes

Offline Dairy Lama

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Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #85 on: June 20, 2012, 02:16:27 am »
Somebody asked me recently what the various Buddhist traditions had in common, and I said "The Four Noble Truths".  But was that a good answer? :wink1:

That's a very cynical attitude.

Eh?  Why cynical?  It was the first answer that came to me, then I wondered if it was correct. 
"My religion is very simple - my religion is ice-cream"

GoGet

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Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #86 on: June 20, 2012, 05:20:53 am »
Somebody asked me recently what the various Buddhist traditions had in common, and I said "The Four Noble Truths".  But was that a good answer? :wink1:

That's a very cynical attitude.

Eh?  Why cynical?  It was the first answer that came to me, then I wondered if it was correct.

You should know the answer to that already ......

Offline truemoves

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Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #87 on: June 21, 2012, 07:23:28 am »
I'd forgotten about this thread... A couple of weeks ago I had an opportunity to meet with Ajahn Pasano, Thai Forest monk and abbot of the Abhayagiri Monestary in California. My current practice is in the Goenka/ U Ba Khin tradition, and I meet regularly with a Zen monk. Another person in this small group has an active Vajrayana practice. And there was a guy with a Japanese Pure Land practice. And some followers of a non-sectarian Western Buddhist movement. And a Dharma Punk. Come to think of it, no one in this small group represented the Thai Forest sect, except Ven. Pasano himself and three monks from his monastery. And once again, congruent with all of my "real world" Buddhist experiences, sect and tradition did not matter very much. The woman with the Vajrayana practice did not throw blood or spit at the Ajahn, the Pure Land guy did not storm out in a huff. Instead we had a very enthusiastic discussion about the Dharma/ Dhamma. Am I wrong in asserting (again) that this stuff only matters to Internet Buddhists?

Not surprised by that at all, sounds like a great example of people sharing what they Love. I attended a conference in Seattle some years ago and it just seemed like a lot of monks from various traditions were polite, respectful and curious about each other. A very good look for Buddhist leaders and practitioners.  I think it's an internet thing in general. People express themselves without skilfully relating to the others and without thinking out the power of their words.

What is the non sectarian group you referred to?


Offline Monkey Mind

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Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #88 on: June 21, 2012, 10:45:55 am »
What is the non sectarian group you referred to?
I think two of the people attended retreats at Spirit Rock, and had a local study group.

GoGet

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Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #89 on: June 21, 2012, 10:55:36 am »
Am I wrong in asserting (again) that this stuff only matters to Internet Buddhists?

No, I don't think you're wrong at all.

Most Buddhists recognize what they have in common with other Buddhists and emphasize that in their dealings with them.  If the see differences at all those differences are largely ignored.

It doesn't work that way on the 'net.  It's here people take exception to Mahayanists  using terms like Hinayana.  It's here that people give a sh1t Dorje Shugden.  It's here people use the Pali canon against their fellow Buddhist, offering defacto condemnations of heresey and accusations that their Dharma Siblings aren't Buddhist at all.

Out in the "real world" it doesn't seem to work like that.

Not far from my house a new Buddhist center opened and the members did a ton of work on the grounds.  I stopped by one Sunday afternoon to see the work they had done.  I was immdiately approached by a young woman who showed me around.  As it turned out, this center was set up to serve the Vietnamese immigrant community.  This Sangha was getting together for a pot-luck after Sunday practice and the young woman took me over to introduce me to the monk leading the Sangha.  A very nice fellow, who asked if I was a Buddhist (yes) where I practiced (Kagyu Sangha in Boulder), my name and so on.  Very pleased with my simply being there, he invited me to sit down and have lunch.  The members of the Sangha (all Vietnamese) were very insistant that I take a seat and eat with them.   Nothing really mattered save that I had taken refuge and I had stoped by for a visit.  The fact that I was of a different ethnicity/race and a much different lineage of practice was immaterial.  They were saddened when I turned down lunch because of prior committments but still happy that I stopped by to say high.

Out in the real world much of what 'Net Buddhists labor over endlessly, simply doesn't matter.

Nor should it.

 


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