Author Topic: Footprints on the Journey: Key Points - Khenpo Sodargye  (Read 605 times)

Offline UK Bodhi Association

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Footprints on the Journey: Key Points - Khenpo Sodargye
« on: May 01, 2016, 03:34:38 am »


Key Points

When it comes to practicing Dharma, many people either lack enthusiasm or run out of steam. Such obstacles occur because of their inability to relinquish mundane concerns. Zen Buddhism also stresses giving up earthly affairs, as disenchantment to the world arises, accomplishment is reached with ease.

Geshe Potowa says: “Clinging to mundane affairs of this life may seem comforting in the beginning, but eventually it will become a tight binding rope. A spiritual seeker should cut off attachment to this life with the sword of wisdom; the teaching that teaches you to do so is the best one.” Nowadays, some famous practitioners may talk days on end about prana wind, bindo, or other high trainings, but due to a lack of contemplation and analysis, they scarcely renounce the secular world. Talking about lofty and impractical practices makes no sense; it is better to work sincerely to eradicate clinging to this world. To a person on the brink of dying from hunger, merely showing him piles of gold, silver, and other treasures is of no avail in saving him. It’s the same case here.

The crucial point in doing any practice is to grasp its essence. On the other hand, devoting all one’s energy to favoring friends and relatives, to overcoming enemies, or to amassing wealth, is not a bit of wisdom. Geshe Potowa also says: “One who does not put the teaching into actual practice is not different from animals, no matter how well this person might have done in study and reflection.” In terms of survival, animals possess skills rivaling those of humans. To deal with snakes, the sand lizard is capable of plotting to bite back at the snake; crows and monkeys also know how to take revenge for insults among themselves. Compared to the skill of mice in amassing possessions, even the scrooges among humans have to take a back seat; many animals are very adept in raising their offspring. Born as human beings, how can we be willing to equate ourselves to animals? Therefore, we should know the keys to practice.

Reverent Master Hui Yuan of Dong Lin Temple, one of the main seats of the Pure Land School, served well as the model of abandoning worldly trifles. A powerful chief Huan Xuan tried to persuade him to give up ordination and advised that he should “realize one’s mistakes and mend one’s ways.” When being enticed with a high government position and the pleasure of fame and wealth, the Zen master wrote to reply: “The glory of this life flashes like lightning, whatever comes together is bound to depart. Are these things worth chasing after? How confused are men of shortsightedness! When these people of lesser acumen hear Dharma teachings, they can only respond with silly laughs. This is exactly the case of ‘not realizing the mistakes nor mending the ways’.” His noble integrity—neither yielding to powerful forces nor caring about prestige and money—is really amazing. It deserves our highest respect!

Alas, this world is filled with too many smart alecks but way too few genuine practitioners of the Buddhadharma!


29th of January, Year of RenWu
March 12, 2002

Offline CorporateBuddha

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Re: Footprints on the Journey: Key Points - Khenpo Sodargye
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2016, 11:42:35 pm »
What is being said here reminds me of The Parable of the Burning House. In this parable a scenario is presented where children are in great danger in a house on fire :-

One day, a fire broke out in the house of a wealthy man who had many children. The wealthy man shouted at his children inside the burning house to flee. But, the children were absorbed in their games and did not heed his warning, though the house was being consumed by flames.

Then, the wealthy man devised a practical way to lure the children from the burning house. Knowing that the children were fond of interesting playthings, he called out to them, "Listen! Outside the gate are the carts that you have always wanted: carts pulled by goats, carts pulled by deer, and carts pulled by oxen. Why don't you come out and play with them?" The wealthy man knew that these things would be irresistible to his children.

The children, eager to play with these new toys rushed out of the house but, instead of the carts that he had promised, the father gave them a cart much better than any he has described - a cart draped with precious stones and pulled by white bullocks. The important thing being that the children were saved from the dangers of the house on fire.

In this parable the father, of course, is the Buddha and sentient beings are the children trapped in the burning house. The Burning House represents the world burning with the fires of old age, sickness and death. The teachings of the Buddha are like the father getting the boys to leave their pleasures for a greater pleasure, Nirvana.

A further interpretation is to see the the goat, deer, and ox carts as representing the early teachings of Buddhism, as the teachings of Hinayana Buddhism (the Mahayana term for the Buddhism that preceded it), and the cart pulled by white bullocks to 'The Lotus Sutra' which, when followed, leads to Buddhahood.


Offline Pixie

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Re: Footprints on the Journey: Key Points - Khenpo Sodargye
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2016, 01:50:51 am »
Quote from: UK Bodhi Association

Alas, this world is filled with too many smart alecks but way too few genuine practitioners of the Buddhadharma!


Those comments seem unnecessary and judgemental in my opinion. 

To quote Zafrogzen: "Are these posts done by a bot? "
« Last Edit: May 04, 2016, 01:54:15 am by Pixie »
May all beings have happiness and the causes of happiness.
May they all be free from suffering and the causes of suffering.
May they never be deprived of true happiness devoid of any suffering.
May they abide in great impartiality, free from attachment to loved ones and aversion to others.

Offline UK Bodhi Association

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Re: Footprints on the Journey: Key Points - Khenpo Sodargye
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2016, 03:39:26 am »
What is being said here reminds me of The Parable of the Burning House. In this parable a scenario is presented where children are in great danger in a house on fire :-

One day, a fire broke out in the house of a wealthy man who had many children. The wealthy man shouted at his children inside the burning house to flee. But, the children were absorbed in their games and did not heed his warning, though the house was being consumed by flames.

Then, the wealthy man devised a practical way to lure the children from the burning house. Knowing that the children were fond of interesting playthings, he called out to them, "Listen! Outside the gate are the carts that you have always wanted: carts pulled by goats, carts pulled by deer, and carts pulled by oxen. Why don't you come out and play with them?" The wealthy man knew that these things would be irresistible to his children.

The children, eager to play with these new toys rushed out of the house but, instead of the carts that he had promised, the father gave them a cart much better than any he has described - a cart draped with precious stones and pulled by white bullocks. The important thing being that the children were saved from the dangers of the house on fire.

In this parable the father, of course, is the Buddha and sentient beings are the children trapped in the burning house. The Burning House represents the world burning with the fires of old age, sickness and death. The teachings of the Buddha are like the father getting the boys to leave their pleasures for a greater pleasure, Nirvana.

A further interpretation is to see the the goat, deer, and ox carts as representing the early teachings of Buddhism, as the teachings of Hinayana Buddhism (the Mahayana term for the Buddhism that preceded it), and the cart pulled by white bullocks to 'The Lotus Sutra' which, when followed, leads to Buddhahood.



Rejoice and appreciate your sharing :)

 


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