Author Topic: Humaness of the buddha after awakening  (Read 4332 times)

Chokyi Wangpo

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Re: Humaness of the buddha after awakening
« Reply #30 on: December 09, 2009, 11:00:47 pm »
I would like to add that pain and suffering are two different things, and one is the perception of the other. Enlightenment is freedom from suffering but not necessarily pain...

Offline Arya-Shraman

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Re: Humaness of the buddha after awakening
« Reply #31 on: December 11, 2009, 05:12:00 am »
People really write notoriously big posts here .I didnt read everything but went through it . I think(from the evidences scattered in tipitak) the body of Buddha did face many afflictions though the Buddha-Mind was totally unreactive to it. So No real sufferings.

I think if you stab a Buddha .He will die bleeding. (But You should not stab him).

thornbush

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Re: Humaness of the buddha after awakening
« Reply #32 on: December 11, 2009, 07:23:47 am »
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I think if you stab a Buddha .He will die bleeding. (But You should not stab him).

Surprisingly, one is not able to end the life of a Tathagata...see here
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Ajātasattu agreed, and provided Devadatta with royal archers to shoot the Buddha.
These were placed on different paths, one on one path, two on another, and so on up to sixteen, and the plan was so laid that not one of them would survive to tell the tale.
But when the Buddha approached the first man, he was terrified by the Buddha's majesty, and his body became stiff.
The Buddha spoke kindly to him, and the man, throwing away his weapons, confessed his intended crime.
The Buddha thereupon preached to him and, having converted him, sent him back by a different path.
The other groups of archers, tired of waiting, gave up the vigil and went away one after the other.
The different groups were led to the Buddha by his iddhi-power, and he preached to them and converted them.
The first man returned to Devadatta saying that he was unable to kill the Buddha because of his great iddhi-power.

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Devadatta then decided to kill the Buddha himself. One day, when the Buddha was walking on the slopes of Gijjhakūta, he hurled down on him a great rock. Two peaks sprang up from the ground, thereby arresting its rushing advance, but a splinter struck the Buddha's foot, causing the blood to flow. Being in great pain, he was carried to Maddakucchi, and from there to Jīvaka's Ambavana, where Jīvaka attended him. After this event, the monks wished the Buddha to have a guard, but this he refused, saying that it was impossible for anyone to deprive a Tathāgata of his life.


Addendum: here and here

Offline Arya-Shraman

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Re: Humaness of the buddha after awakening
« Reply #33 on: December 11, 2009, 07:52:22 am »
Thornbush,

Cant really believe that unless I try. Which I am not looking forward to.So this issue would remain unresolved.

thornbush

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Re: Humaness of the buddha after awakening
« Reply #34 on: December 11, 2009, 09:04:56 am »
Thornbush,

Cant really believe that unless I try. Which I am not looking forward to.So this issue would remain unresolved.
Yes and I am not risking to spend my retirement in the depths of Avici either so...  ;D

David

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Re: Humaness of the buddha after awakening
« Reply #35 on: December 11, 2009, 09:23:12 am »
People really write notoriously big posts here .

Ain't that the truth!  ;) I find it difficult to read a very long post and usually just skim them. 

thornbush

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Re: Humaness of the buddha after awakening
« Reply #36 on: December 11, 2009, 08:35:21 pm »
People really write notoriously big posts here .

Ain't that the truth!  ;) I find it difficult to read a very long post and usually just skim them. 
Believe it or not, one is not punished/banned for not reading it... ;D

Offline Monkey Mind

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Re: Humaness of the buddha after awakening
« Reply #37 on: December 11, 2009, 08:57:15 pm »

[/quote]
Believe it or not, one is not punished/banned for not reading it... ;D
[/quote]

NOW you tell me!   ;D

thornbush

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Re: Humaness of the buddha after awakening
« Reply #38 on: December 11, 2009, 10:45:04 pm »
Quote
Quote
Believe it or not, one is not punished/banned for not reading it... ;D
NOW you tell me!   ;D
No ask, no tell... ;D

Offline retrofuturist

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Re: Humaness of the buddha after awakening
« Reply #39 on: December 15, 2009, 03:24:34 pm »
Greetings,

In the Pali Canon there are many instances of the Buddha asking a question that he would not have needed to ask if he were omniscient (and that's putting aside the questions asked in the interests of creating a teaching opportunity). There are also instances where he clearly would not have acted in the way he did, if he had known what he would later come to know. Apologies I don't have examples off the top of my head, but I can't think of what keywords I would use to search for such examples. I can't find it just now, but there's also a sutta where the Buddha gives meditation instructions to a group of bhikkhus (on the repulsiveness of the body?) and shortly after, they all commit suicide. Had the Buddha known his teaching would not be understood correctly, he clearly would not have issued such instructions.

I still can't seem to find it online, but I've found it in a book and I have a few spare minutes, so I'll type it out.

SN 54.9: Vessali Sutta (Nanamoli translation)

The Blessed One was once living as Vesali in the Hall with the Pointed Roof in the Great Wood. It was an occasion when he had talked to the bhikkhus in many ways on contemplation of loathsomeness (in the body), commending contemplation on loathsomeness and the maintenance of it in being. Then he told the bhikkhus: "Bhikkhus, I wish to go into retreat for half a month. I am not to be approach by anyone except by him who brings me almsfood."

"Even so, Lord," they replied, and they did as they had been instructed.

Then those bhikkhus thought over what the Blessed One had said in commendation of contemplating the loathsomeness (of the body), and they dwelt devoted to the pursuit of maintaining in being that contemplation. So doing, they became humiliated, ashamed and disgusted with this body, and they sought the use of the knife (to take their lives). On a single day as many as ten, twenty or thirty bhikkhus used the knife.

At the end of the half month the Blessed One rose from retreat, and he addressed the venerable Ananda thus: "Ananda, why has the Sangha of bhikkhus become so thinned out?"

The venerable Ananda told him what had happened, and he added: "Lord, let the Blessed One announce another way for this Sangha of bhikkhus to find establishment in final knowledge."

"In that case, Ananda, summon as many bhikkhus as are living in the neighbourhood of Vesali to meet in the assembly hall."

The venerabler Ananda did so, and when they had met, he informed the Blessed One. The Blessed One then went to the assembly hall where he sat down on a seat made ready. When he had done so, he addressed the bhikkhus thus:

"Bhikkhus, when this mindfulness of breathing is maintained in being and developed, it offers peace and a superior goal, it is unadulterated (by loathsomeness) and a pleasant abiding, and it causes evil unwholesome mental objects to vanish as soon as they arise, just as when dirt and dust are blown about in the last month of the hot season, a great shower out of season makes them vanish at once as soon as they arise."

Metta,
Retro. :)

 


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