Author Topic: is buddhahood impermanent?  (Read 1044 times)

Offline stillpointdancer

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Re: is buddhahood impermanent?
« Reply #45 on: May 14, 2017, 02:52:13 am »
So I should understand the definition of a Buddha, for our purposes, as someone who has gained enlightenment, but who then does different things with it?
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Offline IdleChater

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Re: is buddhahood impermanent?
« Reply #46 on: May 14, 2017, 08:19:07 am »
So I should understand the definition of a Buddha, for our purposes, as someone who has gained enlightenment, but who then does different things with it?

Yes, sorta.  A Buddha is one who brings enlightenment and wisdom. 

Of course that could be any enlightened being.  Maybe that's how it is and he reason we don't see it is our own limited perceptions.

In Vajrayana we are taught that to see our guru as a Buddha - a powerful step on the path to our own Buddhahood.  This is not just paying lip service to the concept, but to actually "see" our Guru as a fully, and supremely enlightened Buddha.

I would say that while my Guru and Shakyamuni can be viewed as Buddhas, the difference is that The Dharma had been entirely forgotten in the world when Gotama became enlightened and turned the Wheel of Dharma.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2017, 09:25:21 am by IdleChater »

Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: is buddhahood impermanent?
« Reply #47 on: May 14, 2017, 11:10:01 am »
Quote
Stillpointdancer:  "..."should understand the definition of a Buddha, for our purposes, as someone who has gained enlightenment, but who then does different things with it?"

My conclusion as to your question reflects back upon an old biblical citation found in The Old Testament, Torah, The Qur'An,and as well as The New Testament.:  "You know the tree by it's fruit."


Sakyamuni Buddha described this same concept to his followers with respect to, who deserves the title, "Brahman":


Quote
... a certain monk who was a brahman by birth said to the Blessed One, "To what extent, lord, is one a brahman? And which are the qualities that make one a brahman?"

Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:


Having banished evil qualities,[2]
those who go about ever mindful,
awakened, their fetters ended:
   They, in the world,
   are truly brahmans.

Having recently watched a documentary about The 14th Dalai Lama,  "  https://www.amazon.com/gp/video/detail/B01LBZTSLO/ref=pd_cbs_318_2 "

A quotation given by HHDL during this documentary reminded me of what a living Buddha would be like, when he said (paraphrasing):  "We should strive to abandon our concerns about the self, illustrated by using the word I, I, and I over and over again, and instead think in terms of "we" when considering potential solutions to any problem.  Thinking in terms of "we" requires compassion and in effect distributes the weight and significance of any problem across the whole of humanity, or all life for that matter.  This perspective reduces individual suffering and raises our mentality to be compassionate in that it has the advantage of always being considerate of the needs of others first and foremost.

If anyone deserves the title of a living Buddha, one who thinks, talks, and acts like HHDL is in my mind worthy.  At least he seems to live consistently with The Buddha's teachings as cited in the suttas. :r4wheel:
« Last Edit: May 14, 2017, 11:12:07 am by Ron-the-Elder »
What Makes an Elder? :
A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

 


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