Author Topic: Psychological, Emotional and Developmental Perspectives  (Read 2505 times)

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: Psychological, Emotional and Developmental Perspectives
« Reply #15 on: December 30, 2010, 03:45:10 am »
In a sense all Buddhist practice is psychological, so I'm still not sure.
I have been taught that your psychology is your samsara. So from that perspective all Buddhist practice is anti-psychological.

An interesting idea, but could you elaborate?  In the broad sense "psychological" means everything that occurs in the mind - which is surely what Buddhist practice is based on? 

Spiny

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: Psychological, Emotional and Developmental Perspectives
« Reply #16 on: December 30, 2010, 03:47:09 am »
Personally I've never liked the word "spiritual", which has become so vague as to be meaningless.

My own private definition is: that which continues to be important about life even after you die.

I don't understand what you mean.

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Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: Psychological, Emotional and Developmental Perspectives
« Reply #17 on: December 30, 2010, 03:50:00 am »
A related question is "What's the difference, if any, between doing MBSR and doing Buddhist practice?"

How important is stress reduction after you die?

Maybe I didn't ask the question clearly.  What is the practical difference between doing Buddhist practices labelled "MBSR" and doing Buddhist practices labelled "Buddhism"?

Spiny

Offline santamonicacj

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Re: Psychological, Emotional and Developmental Perspectives
« Reply #18 on: December 30, 2010, 09:06:23 am »
In a sense all Buddhist practice is psychological, so I'm still not sure.
I have been taught that your psychology is your samsara. So from that perspective all Buddhist practice is anti-psychological.
An interesting idea, but could you elaborate?  In the broad sense "psychological" means everything that occurs in the mind - which is surely what Buddhist practice is based on?
Psychology assumes that our own perception of "me" is the authentic essence of our lives, and tries to make it comfortable. Buddhism says the illusion of the fictional "me" is the cause of all suffering and cannot find lasting happiness. No arrangement of external (people, places, things) or internal (ideas, emotions) circumstances can ultimately work.

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What is the practical difference between doing Buddhist practices labelled "MBSR" and doing Buddhist practices labelled "Buddhism"?
What is the practical difference between a one night stand and making love with your soul-mate? Technically not much. Essentially everything.

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My own private definition is: that which continues to be important about life even after you die.
I don't understand what you mean.
Try contemplating your own death. Whether you believe in post-mortem rebirth or not, three hours after you die not much about this life matters. Your health, finances, political views, demands on life, personal relationships, criticisms and resentments of others, accomplishments and unfinished business, etc., are completely invalidated and meaningless. So what does death not invalidate? If you don't believe in post-mortem rebirth not much. If you do, then your karma and mental development, which you have created while you were alive, are all you take with you. The confusion comes because, unlike Christianity, there can be discernible benefit while you are alive that continues after you die.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2010, 09:53:37 am by santamonicacj »
Warning: I'm enough of a fundamentalist Tibet style Buddhist to believe that for the last 1,000 years Tibet has produced a handful of enlightened masters in every generation. I do not ask that YOU believe it, but it will greatly simplify conversations if you understand that about me. Thanks.

Offline Sunya

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Re: Psychological, Emotional and Developmental Perspectives
« Reply #19 on: December 30, 2010, 09:57:59 am »
In a sense all Buddhist practice is psychological, so I'm still not sure.
I have been taught that your psychology is your samsara. So from that perspective all Buddhist practice is anti-psychological.
An interesting idea, but could you elaborate?  In the broad sense "psychological" means everything that occurs in the mind - which is surely what Buddhist practice is based on?
Psychology assumes that our own perception of "me" is the authentic essence of life, and tries to make it comfortable. Buddhism says the illusion of the fictional "me" is the cause of all suffering and cannot find lasting happiness. No arrangement of external (people, places, things) or internal (ideas, emotions) circumstances can ultimately work.

Not in my understanding. Our own perception of "me" can very easily be an inauthentic interpretation of the essence of life. Surely psychology doesn't intend to foster delusion and pathology. Based on what I've gathered, psychology also says the illusion of the fictional "me" is the cause of all suffering and cannot find lasting happiness, while proposing some relative (not absolute or ultimate) solutions.

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: Psychological, Emotional and Developmental Perspectives
« Reply #20 on: December 31, 2010, 03:22:25 am »
Psychology assumes that our own perception of "me" is the authentic essence of our lives, and tries to make it comfortable. Buddhism says the illusion of the fictional "me" is the cause of all suffering and cannot find lasting happiness.

Good distinction, but both activities take place in the mind and involve developing self-awareness ( mindfulness in Buddhist speak ).  So while the goal may be different, is the method really that different?

Spiny

Offline J. McKenna

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Re: Psychological, Emotional and Developmental Perspectives
« Reply #21 on: December 31, 2010, 10:56:25 am »
Psychology is yet another science created by Man to explain what Man cannot hope to understand. Psychology attempts to explain the spiritual in non-spiritual terms and methods, focusing on the delusion of Man being the center of it all .....
...i found there was no "i" anywhere.....

Offline 0118401

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Re: Psychological, Emotional and Developmental Perspectives
« Reply #22 on: December 31, 2010, 02:18:28 pm »
Just wanted to say thank you to everyone that has posted on this thread, all very useful and interesting. Somebody else I've spoken to about this recommended reading some Jack Kornfield, so perhaps I will do this. I'm going to try to do some work on the psychological side of things, integrate with my practice and see how it goes. This seems to be what my wisdom is telling me. Would be interested in reading more posts if anybody is inclined.

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: Psychological, Emotional and Developmental Perspectives
« Reply #23 on: January 01, 2011, 03:43:00 am »
I'm going to try to do some work on the psychological side of things, integrate with my practice and see how it goes.

That sounds like a good approach.   I'd recommend keeping a solid meditation practice going if you can, that helps to keep things in perspective. 

Spiny

Offline 0118401

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Re: Psychological, Emotional and Developmental Perspectives
« Reply #24 on: January 01, 2011, 05:38:21 pm »
I'm going to try to do some work on the psychological side of things, integrate with my practice and see how it goes.

That sounds like a good approach.   I'd recommend keeping a solid meditation practice going if you can, that helps to keep things in perspective. 

Spiny

Thanks, I'll definately keep a daily meditation practise going, Lamrim and and Tantra. It would be easy to get sidetracked.

Offline katersy

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Re: Psychological, Emotional and Developmental Perspectives
« Reply #25 on: January 03, 2011, 05:14:42 am »
In a very broad sense, Buddhism is psychology....maybe.
"Everything has been figured out, except how to live."

"She believed in nothing; Only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist."

Offline J. McKenna

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Re: Psychological, Emotional and Developmental Perspectives
« Reply #26 on: January 03, 2011, 06:19:04 pm »
Subtle difference, but Psychology is Man's attempt to explain and make sense of what cannot be explained in Man's terms.   
 
Buddhism is an attempt to teach Man how to experience what cannot be explained in any terms.  :wink1:
...i found there was no "i" anywhere.....

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: Psychological, Emotional and Developmental Perspectives
« Reply #27 on: January 04, 2011, 02:36:52 am »
In a very broad sense, Buddhism is psychology....maybe.

Yes, if you define psychology in the broadest sense of understanding the mind.  Somebody once referred to Buddhism as the "science of the mind", can't recall who it was unfortunately.

Spiny

Offline J. McKenna

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...i found there was no "i" anywhere.....

Offline 0118401

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Re: Psychological, Emotional and Developmental Perspectives
« Reply #29 on: January 10, 2011, 10:40:01 am »
I think Geshe Kelsang Gyatso describes Buddhism as the 'science of the mind', sorry I can't direct you to the quotation though. Of course this is a very different kind of science that Gesha La is talking about, profound inner science based on wisdom rather than materialistic science based on emperical evidence in peer reviewed journals and such like.   

 


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