Author Topic: Psychological, Emotional and Developmental Perspectives  (Read 2520 times)

Offline Spiny Norman

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Re: Psychological, Emotional and Developmental Perspectives
« Reply #30 on: January 12, 2011, 05:19:41 am »
I think Geshe Kelsang Gyatso describes Buddhism as the 'science of the mind', sorry I can't direct you to the quotation though. Of course this is a very different kind of science that Gesha La is talking about, profound inner science based on wisdom rather than materialistic science based on emperical evidence in peer reviewed journals and such like.   

It seems to me that Buddhist insight practice has much in common with scientific method in the broad sense.  In both cases there is a detailed examination of how things are.

Spiny

Offline santamonicacj

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Re: Psychological, Emotional and Developmental Perspectives
« Reply #31 on: January 12, 2011, 10:11:16 am »
In a very broad sense, Buddhism is psychology....maybe.

Yes, if you define psychology in the broadest sense of understanding the mind.  Somebody once referred to Buddhism as the "science of the mind", can't recall who it was unfortunately.
I think Ponlop R. does, although he's probably not the only one.
Warning: I'm enough of a fundamentalist Tibet style Buddhist to believe that for the last 1,000 years Tibet has produced a handful of enlightened masters in every generation. I do not ask that YOU believe it, but it will greatly simplify conversations if you understand that about me. Thanks.

Offline 0118401

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Re: Psychological, Emotional and Developmental Perspectives
« Reply #32 on: January 16, 2011, 04:00:02 pm »
I think Geshe Kelsang Gyatso describes Buddhism as the 'science of the mind', sorry I can't direct you to the quotation though. Of course this is a very different kind of science that Gesha La is talking about, profound inner science based on wisdom rather than materialistic science based on emperical evidence in peer reviewed journals and such like.   

It seems to me that Buddhist insight practice has much in common with scientific method in the broad sense.  In both cases there is a detailed examination of how things are.

Spiny

I hadn't thought of it like that before, but it's true isn't it. Scientific method is a detailed analysis of conventional phenomena, without an awareness of that fact, apart from particle physicists and so forth perhaps.

 


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