Author Topic: Has anyone created anything with mind over matter?  (Read 367 times)

Offline BlackLooter

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Has anyone created anything with mind over matter?
« on: January 27, 2018, 07:23:45 pm »
I heard that the Buddha could create sense objects at will and even heard that he could make Gold..(straight without alchemical transmutation)
I've created a few pieces of clothing.. shirts, hoody, toque..

And I've found mystical objects on the road like a piece of Onyx..

Anyone else found anything mystical or created something via mind over matter?
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Offline VincentRJ

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Re: Has anyone created anything with mind over matter?
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2018, 08:14:40 pm »
Many of the products of modern science, such as videos, TV sets, airplanes, antibiotics, anesthetics, heart transplants, and so on, would have been considered to be miracles during the times of the Buddha, and also much later.

Offline BlackLooter

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Re: Has anyone created anything with mind over matter?
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2018, 08:47:31 pm »
Hmmm,, yeah I see the line of technology merging with the miraculous..

I would say our technology is about 88% in comparison to miracles..

Have you ever witnessed a miracle?
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Offline VincentRJ

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Re: Has anyone created anything with mind over matter?
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2018, 10:07:42 pm »
Have you ever witnessed a miracle?

Probably, if one uses the definition of miracle as 'an extraordinary and welcome event that is not explicable by natural or scientific laws.'

Despite the marvels of modern science, there is still so much that we don't understand and cannot explain.
When the human genome was cracked a few decades ago, most people quite rightly thought that was a marvelous achievement. However, what was not so widely advertised at the time was that we'd cracked only 2% of the genome, specifically, the protein-encoding genes. The remaining 98% of our genes was considered to be junk DNA, remnants of our evolutionary past, serving no purpose.

We've now realised how wrong we were. That so-called junk DNA does appear to serve a purpose. It might even explain the concept of Karma, in terms of 'Transgenerational Epigenetic Inheritance', whereby our genes are modified by our behaviour in this life, and those traits, whether good or bad, are passed on to our offspring.

Another example is the claimed existence of Dark Matter and Dark Energy. A few decades ago we believed the expansion of the universe was slowing down, would eventually come to a halt, and then the universe would gradually contract and collapse on itself. Even the great Stephen Hawking was of this opinion.

Then, as a result of the new Hubble telescope, which allowed us to see further to the outer reaches of the universe, we observed that the universe appeared to be expanding at a faster rate, not at a slower rate which all our theories had predicted. Is that a miracle?  :wink1:

Of course we have an explanation, but it's just a hypothesis. It's hypothesized that 95% of all the matter and energy in the universe is completely invisible and undetectable to us mere mortals. That's an awful lot of invisible stuff that surrounds us.  :wink1:

Offline BlackLooter

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Re: Has anyone created anything with mind over matter?
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2018, 11:36:13 pm »
Lol, I had a dream once where a God like being which was colored blue/black and had these pixelations of color over his body came out of a UFO

He was holding an orb.. the color of calico.. some beige and some like the lighter color of Jupiter..

He then planted this orb and the orb started to absorb everything.. and then I heard a voice say "All of life is a Miracle"

I relate this in this particular way.. : The UFO represents our technology.. and the orb is the philosophers stone which was the prize of the Achemists and represents the end and beggining of The Great Work..

This relates bedause it is from the alchemists that we then discovered chemistry..

So the whole meaning was that technology is just like a miracle..

I think of lasers and weapons of war.. but also the chemistry.. and the assembly line.. all of our drugs perscriptions etc.. the cars and planes we drive for sure

It was Arthur C. Clark that said: "any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic"
And I would include the term "miracle" as well..

Thats so true that technology is really impressive to the mind..

It would be funny to see one of our ancient ancestors do either of these two things..

Do a drug like mushrooms, or have a glimpse of our society.. I wonder which one would be more surprising to them.. more taken aback?

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Offline VincentRJ

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Re: Has anyone created anything with mind over matter?
« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2018, 03:38:32 am »
It was Arthur C. Clark that said: "any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic"
And I would include the term "miracle" as well..


Good point. I tend to agree.

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It would be funny to see one of our ancient ancestors do either of these two things..

Do a drug like mushrooms, or have a glimpse of our society.. I wonder which one would be more surprising to them.. more taken aback?


I think the effects of our modern technology would be much more surprising. The use of certain mind-altering herbs, such as mushrooms and marijuana, goes back into ancient history, well before the times of the Buddha.


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Magic mushrooms go way back

Central Americans were using psilocybin mushrooms before Europeans landed on the New World's shores; the fantastical fungi grow well in subtropical and tropical environments. But how far back were humans tripping on magic mushrooms?
It's not an easy question to answer, but a 1992 paper in the short-lived journal, "Integration: Journal of Mind-Moving Plants and Culture," argued that rock art in the Sahara dating back 9,000 years depicts hallucinogenic mushrooms. The art in question shows masked figures holding mushroomlike objects. Other drawings show mushrooms positioned behind anthropomorphic figures — possibly a nod to the fact that mushrooms grow in dung. (The mushroom figures have also been interpreted as flowers, arrows or other plant matter, however, so it remains an open question whether the people who lived in the ancient Sahara used 'shrooms.)


https://www.livescience.com/48704-odd-facts-about-magic-mushrooms.html

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Marijuana in the Old World

The "weed" that in the United States and Mexico is commonly called marijuana, hemp, or cannabis is in fact a highly useful plant cultivated throughout recorded history and perhaps much earlier as well. There is only one species–– its scientific name is Cannabis sativa–– which yields both a potent drug and a strong fiber long used in the manufacture of fine linen as well as canvas and rope. The seeds are valued as birdseed and the oil, which resembles linseed oil, is valuable because paints made with it dry quickly.

Since cannabis is the only plant that yields both a drug or intoxicant and a useful fiber, its early history can be readily traced through references to a plant that yields both.
A Chinese treatise on pharmacology attributed to the Emperor Shen Nung and alleged to date from 2737 B.C. contains what is usually cited as the earliest reference to marijuana. According to one tradition, it was Shen Nung who first taught his people to value cannabis as a medicine. 1 Shen Nung, however, was a mythical figure, and the treatise was compiled much later than 2737 B.C.

The first known reference to marijuana in India is to be found in the Atharva Veda, which may date as far back as the second millennium B.C. 2 Another quite early reference appears on certain cuneiform tablets unearthed in the Royal Library of Ashurbanipal, an Assyrian king. Ashurbanipal lived about 650 B.C.; but the cuneiform descriptions of marijuana in his library "are generally regarded as obvious copies of much older texts," 3 says Dr. Robert P. Walton, an American physician and authority on marijuana who assembled much of the historical data here reviewed.

This evidence "serves to project the origin of hashish back to the earliest beginnings of history." References to marijuana can also be found, Dr. Walton adds, in the Rh-Ya [sic], a Chinese compendium dating from the period 1200-500 B.C.; in the Susruta, an Indian treatise originating before 400 A.D.; and in the Persian Zend-Avesta, originating several centuries before Christ. 4

The ancient Greeks used alcohol rather than marijuana as an intoxicant; but they traded with marijuana-eating and marijuana-inhaling peoples. Hence some of the references to drugs in Homer may be to marijuana, including Homer's reference to the drug which Helen brought to Troy from Egyptian Thebes. 

Certainly Herodotus was referring to marijuana when he wrote in the fifth century B.C. that the Scythians cultivated a plant that was much like flax but grew thicker and taller; this hemp they deposited upon red-hot stones in a closed room–– producing a vapor, Herodotus noted, "that no Grecian vapor-bath can surpass.
The Scythians, transported with the vapor, shout aloud."

Herodotus also described people living on islands in the Araxes River, who "meet together in companies," throw marijuana on a fire, then "sit around in a circle; and by inhaling the fruit that has been thrown on, they become intoxicated by the odor, just as the Greeks do by wine; and the more fruit is thrown on, the more intoxicated they become, until they rise up and dance and betake themselves to singing." 

Other passages assembled by Dr. Walton–– from Pliny, Dioscorides, Paulus Aegineta, Abu Mansur Muwaffaq, The Arabian Nights, Marco Polo, and others–– leave little room for doubt that marijuana was cultivated both for its fiber and for its psychoactive properties throughout Asia and the Near East from the earliest known times to the present.


http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/library/studies/cu/cu53.html

 


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