Author Topic: Theories of liberation  (Read 457 times)

Offline ground

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Re: Theories of liberation
« Reply #15 on: August 03, 2017, 09:33:41 pm »
However it would perhaps be more appropriate to use the scientific linguistic convention here and speak of 'hypotheses of liberation' once there is a clear cut understanding of what it is one wants to be liberated from.
In science only when a hypothesis is confirmed by experiments it becomes a theory, i.e. a theory is already validated by practice.

My own theory of liberation is:
1. one established the emptiness of inherent existence, i.e. the emptiness of truth, of all phenomena, self and other, by means of rational analysis which implies seeing that all phenomena, self and other, exist only through imputation.
2. one establishes the ground of [conscious] being by means of thoroughly investigating into the question: Since all phenomena, self and other, exist only through imputation, what then exists without imputation? The 'answer' necessarily cannot involved any imputation and thus necessarily is empty of both, intuitive and conceptual imputations. The 'answer' emerges spontaneously.
Then being again in the imputing mode of consciousness one can say that 'the answer' has already been met countless times before but obviously has passed by kind of 'unnoticed', i.e. has not been registered.


As to item 1:
All there is is the perceptible originating either from initial direct perception (sense direct perception) or from initial indirect perception (stand-alone concept).
The perceptible is either compounded or uncompounded.
The compounded is neither inherently one with nor inherently separate from its compounds therefore it is empty of true existence.
The uncompounded depends on the compounded therefore it is empty of true existence, too.
As a consequence everything ('the All') is only imputedly (or nominally) existent.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2017, 09:39:33 pm by ground »

Offline The Artis Magistra

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Re: Theories of liberation
« Reply #16 on: August 05, 2017, 01:37:02 pm »
Liberation from flux, the ups and the downs, the highs and lows, the cheering and crying and pain and pleasure cycles of a terrible rollercoaster ride in reality.

All should want to eradicate suffering, so that there can be stable tranquility, which is to be happy and at peace in a way that is not lost at all. That is the goal or ideal, to be liberated from the bad and painful experiences and the crashes and have a serene experience which is unperturbed by flux and does not fluctuate wildly. This does not mean the end of goodness, but ongoing compassion, care, and beneficence has often been considered important and maintained by those who achieve. You lose nothing, you gain everything, and you lose any fear of loss, because you have won and will always win, which removes worries and makes one feel safe and one does what they can do and is best, but would prefer all to be good and stable and peaceful, wanting no pain or vileness left.

Offline ground

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Re: Theories of liberation
« Reply #17 on: August 11, 2017, 10:15:49 pm »
However it would perhaps be more appropriate to use the scientific linguistic convention here and speak of 'hypotheses of liberation' once there is a clear cut understanding of what it is one wants to be liberated from.
In science only when a hypothesis is confirmed by experiments it becomes a theory, i.e. a theory is already validated by practice.

My own theory of liberation is:
1. one established the emptiness of inherent existence, i.e. the emptiness of truth, of all phenomena, self and other, by means of rational analysis which implies seeing that all phenomena, self and other, exist only through imputation.
2. one establishes the ground of [conscious] being by means of thoroughly investigating into the question: Since all phenomena, self and other, exist only through imputation, what then exists without imputation? The 'answer' necessarily cannot involved any imputation and thus necessarily is empty of both, intuitive and conceptual imputations. The 'answer' emerges spontaneously.
Then being again in the imputing mode of consciousness one can say that 'the answer' has already been met countless times before but obviously has passed by kind of 'unnoticed', i.e. has not been registered.


As to item 1:
All there is is the perceptible originating either from initial direct perception (sense direct perception) or from initial indirect perception (stand-alone concept).
The perceptible is either compounded or uncompounded.
The compounded is neither inherently one with nor inherently separate from its compounds therefore it is empty of true existence.
The uncompounded depends on the compounded therefore it is empty of true existence, too.
As a consequence everything ('the All') is only imputedly (or nominally) existent.


Having said that liberation is nothing but that which is descibed here as 'cessation of kamma': it is the cessation of phassa ('contact').
Phassa having ceased knowing is spontaneously present.

Offline The Artis Magistra

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Re: Theories of liberation
« Reply #18 on: August 11, 2017, 10:40:40 pm »
Cool! Keep going please, tell me all about it in very simple but thoroughly detailed ways! Can you explain and describe easily each term involved too? Like what is "contact"? etc. Every term you bring up. Also, anyone else, feel free to share your ideas or corrections please!

 


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