Author Topic: What do you tell your loved ones?  (Read 2807 times)

overmyhead

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Re: What do you tell your loved ones?
« Reply #15 on: December 01, 2009, 10:02:22 pm »
I appreciate everyone's concern for my well-being.   ;D

WonderlandAlli, it became clear to me a while ago that this life, this whole thing, is not about me.  The idea of scrubbing out a living, meager or luxurious, just does not appeal to me.  I would rather swing for the fences, so to speak, or perish trying.  To echo Buddhist sentiments, in a world characterized by impermanence, where everything is fleeting, I am looking for something which is eternal, which can always be counted on.  If after a couple years, I end up hating monk life, well, then I'll leave.  It is not prison.

David, I agree with your sentiment.  I am human and, despite my resoluteness, I am subject to everything that humans are subject to.  My greatest fear is falling in love.  That might trap me in this life forever.

Monkey Mind, I have some school debt too.  I guess I have to find a way to get those suckers paid off.

David

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Re: What do you tell your loved ones?
« Reply #16 on: December 02, 2009, 02:03:42 pm »
David, I agree with your sentiment.  I am human and, despite my resoluteness, I am subject to everything that humans are subject to.  My greatest fear is falling in love.  That might trap me in this life forever.

Regardless of the path you take, it is not possible to be trapped in this life forever.  Both householders and monks are subject to anicca.

Offline WonderlandAlli

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Re: What do you tell your loved ones?
« Reply #17 on: December 02, 2009, 08:28:00 pm »
Is it just me, or does it seem that Western converts to Buddhadamma seem to be very anti-monastic?  If one wants to truly be free from delusion, a cloistered life, at least for a while, is almost inescapable.  Do we really think it's possible to move about in general society, being bombarded with greed, hate and delusion from all sides and NOT be affected?  Everything about Western culture is geared toward building the very things Buddhadhamma is trying to rid us of.  Why discourage someone who wants to leave that?  One can disrobe just as surely as one can ordain.  And btw, in Buddhist countries, 24 would be hardly considered too young to ordain, quite the opposite actually.

I'm not anti-monastic at all. I am anti-romanticizing and not fully understanding what one is getting into. I deeply respect monastics.

We also live differently in the US than in most Buddhist countries and come from rather different viewpoints.
sÄ«la ♥ samādhi  ♥ paññā

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Offline WonderlandAlli

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Re: What do you tell your loved ones?
« Reply #18 on: December 02, 2009, 08:30:42 pm »
WonderlandAlli, it became clear to me a while ago that this life, this whole thing, is not about me.  The idea of scrubbing out a living, meager or luxurious, just does not appeal to me.  I would rather swing for the fences, so to speak, or perish trying.  To echo Buddhist sentiments, in a world characterized by impermanence, where everything is fleeting, I am looking for something which is eternal, which can always be counted on.  If after a couple years, I end up hating monk life, well, then I'll leave.  It is not prison.

I don't mean that its a prison, so I hope it didn't come across this way. I just hope that you fully understand what is involved before doing it so that you aren't taken by surprise, and I also am guesing that your parents have that concern, and that they need to understand that it will make you happy to live differently, even if it is strange to them. I'm a fan of gradual changes really.

Regardless, it was just my two cents and wasn't meant to cause issues.
sÄ«la ♥ samādhi  ♥ paññā

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Offline Monkey Mind

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Re: What do you tell your loved ones?
« Reply #19 on: December 02, 2009, 10:12:21 pm »
Ajahn Brahm has repeatedly stated that he thought becoming a monk would mean that he would spend a lot of time alone in meditation. He had no idea that so much of his day would be spend being a teacher, an administrator, a diplomat, and a marriage counselor.

Offline RayZen

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Re: What do you tell your loved ones?
« Reply #20 on: December 03, 2009, 05:56:43 am »
Work a full time job, study Dharma, and try to find enough cushion / zafu time?  Im starting to think that I'm kidding myself.
Sure you could still accumulate plenty of merit especially if you could turn work into the path, but the study and meditation part requires muchos time. I really, really feel that I need to be able to give my practice much more time.
« Last Edit: December 03, 2009, 06:40:37 am by RayZen »

dumb bonbu

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Re: What do you tell your loved ones?
« Reply #21 on: December 03, 2009, 01:29:12 pm »
if it weren't for my parents then i wouldn't have this body to practice the Dharma with, these ears to hear the Dharma with, this mouth to enquire about the Dharma with. for the first years of my life my parents provided me with a home, warmth, clothing and food. i am indebted to them. and all i can try and do is express this heart of gratitude every time that i see them. that to me is sharing in the Dharma with them. and while i am fortunate that i can tell them that i am a Buddhist with no fear of upset or arguement, i don't believe that its necessary to do so or the most important thing. what matters is the heart of thankfulness for all they have provided. indeed, when i think of my debt to them, all the selfless love and compassion they have given freely to me throughout my 29 years and despite my innumerable f***ups and selfishness then i see that they are Buddhas helping me along the white path to the Pure Land.

namu amida butsu 

 


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