Author Topic: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana  (Read 19088 times)

Offline Marcus Epicurus

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Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #120 on: January 23, 2014, 05:31:36 pm »
It seems to me we have more in common that differences.
We all have Buddha as our ultimate teacher.
Nuff said. :twocents:
The non-doing of any evil,
the performance of what's skillful,
the cleansing of one's own mind:
this is the teaching of the Awakened.

Offline andyebarnes67

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Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #121 on: October 28, 2014, 02:38:29 am »

As for your earlier question, it might be best to cite the Ven. Sayadaw U Thittila on this matter, as he dealt with it nicely:

According to Buddhism the universe evolved, but it did not evolve out of nothingness, it evolved out of the dispersed matter of a previous universe; and when this universe is dissolved. its dispersed matter, or its residual energy which is continually renewing itself, will in time give rise to another universe in the same way. The process is therefore cyclic and continuous, and the universe itself is composed of millions of world systems, each with its various planes of existence.

Wow. This must be the best quote I've come across that shows the correlation of much of Buddhist Dhamma with the newer theories coming from respected cosmologists on the origin of our universe. bookmarked with much gratitude.
Metta

Andy Barnes
My comments are by nature, subjective interpretations from my mind. As such, they are never wrong, They are as they are. They are never right, They are as they are.

Offline flaneur

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Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #122 on: February 16, 2015, 05:16:56 pm »
Ultimately Dharma is Dharma. I've never understood the metaphysics, cosmologies, dogmas etc.

The Buddha said his goal was to end suffering.


A HANDFUL OF LEAVES
The Blessed One was once living at Kosambi in a wood of simsapa trees. He picked up a few leaves in his hand, and he asked the bhikkhus, ‘How do you conceive this, bhikkhus, which is more, the few leaves that I have picked up in my hand or those on the trees in the wood?

‘The leaves that the Blessed One has picked up in his hand are few, Lord; those in the wood are far more.’

‘So too, bhikkhus, the things that I have known by direct knowledge are more; the things that I have told you are only a few. Why have I not told them? Because they bring no benefit, no advancement in the Holy Life, and because they do not lead to dispassion, to fading, to ceasing, to stilling, to direct knowledge, to enlightenment, to Nibbana. That is why I have not told them. And what have I told you? This is suffering; this is the origin of suffering; this is the cessation of suffering; this is the way leading to the cessation of suffering. That is what I have told you. Why have I told it? Because it brings benefit, and advancement in the Holy Life, and because it leads to dispassion, to fading, to ceasing, to stilling, to direct knowledge, to enlightenment, to Nibbana. So bhikkhus, let your task be this: This is suffering; this is the origin of suffering; this is the cessation of suffering; this is the way leading to the cessation of suffering.’

[Samyutta Nikaya, LVI, 31]
"Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle."

"We're all bozos of this bus."

Offline Kodo308

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Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #123 on: May 18, 2017, 08:13:12 am »
So far, over the last few years since 1963 (50 years, give or take a few months) I have found the following in common between Theravada and Mahayana (perhaps not all Mahayana, but most):

I.  The Buddha was enlightened.
II.  The Buddha had many previous lives.
III. The Buddha taught:
A.  The Four Noble Truths
 1. Which included The Fact of Dukkha
 2.  The cause of dukkha
  3.  That there was a means of eliminating dukkha.
 4.  That means was The Noble Eight Fold Path.
B.  Dependent Origination
C.  Kamma / Karma
D.  Impermanence
E.  Emptiness
F.  Rebirth
G.  The 31 Planes of Existence within the 31 Realms.
H.  The Khandas / Skandas
I.  The aggregates
J.  Meditation
K.  Mindfulness
L.  The Five Basic Precepts
M.  The Six Sense Doors
N.  Mara (The Tempter / The Lord of Delusion / The King of Death)
O.  Rebirth
P.  Nibbana / Nirvana
Q.  Study of Documents written about The Buddha ( Suttas / Sutras )
R.  Celebration of Puja's / Buddhist Holidays.
S.  The coming of the next Buddha  (Maitreyah)
T.  Chanting

That's it for me off the top of my head.

The 4 Brahmaviharas, too. Because srs'ly, you can't leave those out.  :D

Offline Dharma Flower

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Re: Finding Common Ground Between the Theravada and Mahayana
« Reply #124 on: May 18, 2017, 11:50:19 pm »
Of all Buddhist sects around today, I believe that Theravada is closest to the Buddha’s original teachings. Why would I say this as a Mahayana Buddhist? Because Mahayana adapted the Buddha’s original teachings for a broader audience, and there’s nothing wrong with that. 

Even in the Pali canon, which is believed to represent the oldest Buddhist scriptures, the Buddha taught in different ways to different people in different circumstances. This principle of adaptability is called upaya or skillful means:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upaya

As a Mahayana Buddhist, I've long believed the celestial Buddhas and Bodhisattvas, such as Amitabha and Avalokitesvara, to be symbolic of our own potential for enlightenment and of the unconditioned true nature of all things, rather than literal god-like beings:
https://www.thoughtco.com/atheism-and-devotion-in-buddhism-449718

In the following article, Tibetan Buddhist scholar Rita M. Gross gives a scholarly evaluation as to the origin of the Mahayana scriptures, explaining how their spiritual value is not dependent on literal historicity:
https://internationaljournaldharmastudies.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/2196-8802-1-5
« Last Edit: May 19, 2017, 02:51:23 am by Dharma Flower »

 


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