Author Topic: What is Nirvana?  (Read 25107 times)

Offline riju

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #405 on: May 12, 2013, 10:42:07 pm »
Life of EMPTINESS is infinite.
Life of Nirvan is almost infinite and is moving towards infinite.

EMPTINESS is colourless, odourless, physicalless, mindless, logicless,wisdomless....less....less and less.
Nirvan is almost EMPTINESS surrounded by Buddha energies so that it does not get lost in EMPTINESS.
Due to this process  systemetic WISDOM  oriented universes are created from earlier experiences and these universes go on building better and better one upon the other.

Offline riju

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #406 on: May 12, 2013, 11:24:36 pm »
NIRVAN is an extraordinary concept of Bhuddism.

Buddha of the past studied and understood that "NOTHING IS PERMANENT".
They saw many Gods of past with their own devotees and space and universe die away with time.
They understood the timeless WISDOM of creations coming up and dying away.

They studied all this process and then created concept of multi number of SONS surrounding the would be Buddhas. These Buddha sons were guided to Buddha wisdoms and then the Buddhas sacrificed themselves as per the law of IMPERMANENCE in  NIRVAN.
A Buddha fades away in NIRVAN showering away all HIS wisdom to his SONS who surround HIM.

Nirvan concept was started by Buddha Sun Moon Bright with the help of 8 SONS long long time back (chapter Introduction --Lotus sutra)

Offline 5155035

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #407 on: July 20, 2013, 06:57:02 am »
The one who seeks will endlessly seek. The one who is already there says he needs more and is not where he believes himself to be.

Lets pack our bags and head for Nirvana. Each day we shall empty the bag of something, climbing 10 feet higher each day, shedding finally the bag, until we are the top of the mountain with nothing but the view. Then what? Just sit and stare? Sure is pretty.

To my understanding it would be a state where peace and contentment underlie and pervade the perpetuating existance. If its sought, surely there exists a desire to achieve Nirvana? I thought desire was the cause of suffering? If it is not actively sought, how does one attain such a state? Whatever Nirvana is, it is best spoken of by those who have climbed the mountain, if such a trial was required at all.

Offline Hanzze

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #408 on: July 20, 2013, 07:26:04 am »
You would not like what they talk.

Offline ground

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #409 on: July 20, 2013, 07:36:01 am »
... If its sought, surely there exists a desire to achieve Nirvana? I thought desire was the cause of suffering? ...
Desire may be right or wrong depending on the desired. Suffering is the cause of desiring cessation of suffering. Without desire being directed towards that right goal desire will be directed towards wrong goals and objects.  :fu:

Offline songhill

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #410 on: July 20, 2013, 09:37:24 am »
NIRVAN is an extraordinary concept of Bhuddism.

Buddha of the past studied and understood that "NOTHING IS PERMANENT".
They saw many Gods of past with their own devotees and space and universe die away with time.
They understood the timeless WISDOM of creations coming up and dying away.

They studied all this process and then created concept of multi number of SONS surrounding the would be Buddhas. These Buddha sons were guided to Buddha wisdoms and then the Buddhas sacrificed themselves as per the law of IMPERMANENCE in  NIRVAN.
A Buddha fades away in NIRVAN showering away all HIS wisdom to his SONS who surround HIM.

Nirvan concept was started by Buddha Sun Moon Bright with the help of 8 SONS long long time back (chapter Introduction --Lotus sutra)

The Buddha taught all conditionality is impermanent. But he never taught that there is no unconditioned absolute. The Buddha never, actually, fades away, either. Since he is not conditioned but unconditioned, he is still with us.  :)

Offline 5155035

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #411 on: July 20, 2013, 10:05:18 am »
You would not like what they talk.

I can live with that.

Offline Hanzze

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #412 on: July 20, 2013, 10:50:36 am »
You would not like what they talk.

I can live with that.
With what? That you would not like or that you would not like that you would not like? Or that they sometimes talk nevertheless?

Cool word by the way... never then less  :D

Offline kong zen

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #413 on: June 20, 2014, 08:16:08 am »
What is nirvana?
If you are a scholar,
Can you discuss this problem very well,
But if you're a yogi,
To explore this question is meaningless,
Discussion is derived from logical reasoning, and imagination,
Nirvana is a fact of experience,
Logic is limited, nirvana is infinite,
With limited logic cannot measure the infinite wisdom,
It's like a group of people who have never been to the top of the mountain, talking about the top of the mountain is what appearance,
If you want to know what it is like,
In accordance with the dharma to practice,
To cease from evil, To do only good, To purify the will,
Hope you like here below some knowledge,www.zenspeaking.com

I wish you all good lucky for you,

Offline healthandpeace

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #414 on: February 15, 2015, 09:55:07 pm »
samsara and nirvana are one, seen at the highest view.

Offline Dharmakara

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #415 on: February 15, 2015, 10:31:51 pm »
Oh, I suspect that most Theravada practitioners would disagree, though it actually reminds me of something funny that the Ven. Shravasti Dhammika said several years ago during an interview by the Non-duality Magazine (NDM):

Quote
NDM: Is samsara also nirvana like they say in some traditions?
 
S. Dhammika: This idea is not present in the Pali Canon. I always find such paradoxical and enigmatic statements very appealing. The same goes for those wonderful Zen koans. But as far as the situation on the ground is concerned I think they are pretty useless. If samsara and Nirvana are the same what the hell is the point of becoming a pilgrim on the Noble Eightfold Path or indeed doing anything? I suppose I'm rather dualistic. But I'm content to be because I suspect that those who go on about samsara and Nirvana being the same are in fact just as dualistic as I am.

http://www.nondualitymagazine.org/nonduality_magazine.celibacyproject.shravastidhammika.htm



Offline Roope

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #416 on: February 24, 2015, 03:03:23 am »
samsara and nirvana are one, seen at the highest view.

No statement is really true.

What is samsara but an idea? And what is Nirvana (for you right now) but an idea?

edit:

I'm reading Huang Po's writings and noticed some quotes about Nirvana:

"If one thinks that emptiness is an entity and that this emptiness is separate from the Dharmakaya or that there is a Dharmakaya outside of emptiness, one is holding a wrong view.  In the complete absence of views about emptiness (*or anything else, including Nirvana), the true Dharmakaya appears.  Emptiness and Dharmakaya are not different.  Sentient beings and Buddhas are not different. Birth and death and Nirvana are not different. Klesa and Bodhi are not different.  That alone which is beyond all form is Buddha."

"What is perfect Nirvana?  Perfect Nirvana is the sudden understanding that one's own nature is original Buddha and True Mind.  It is the sudden realization that there is neither Buddha nor sentient beings, neither subject nor object.  If this present place is illusion city, where then is perfect Nirvana? Perfect Nirvana cannot be pointed out because we are only able to point out a place.  Whatever is thought of as a place cannot be the condition of true, perfect Nirvana.  One can give indications as to which direction it lies in, but one cannot give a definite location.  However, one may come to a correct and silent understanding of it."
« Last Edit: February 24, 2015, 04:55:15 am by Roope »

Offline Sriramani

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #417 on: March 17, 2015, 09:36:14 pm »
There is no nirvana. The word is designed to express the experience (or non-experience) of Self - that is the greater, or universal "Self" - once the ego is dropped. It is what remains after thought subsists, and is simply Emptiness, or the absence of small self, small mind or small "I". While "it" may be experienced directly, that experience cannot be conveyed in words, as it is infinite.

Offline Dharmakara

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #418 on: March 17, 2015, 11:06:48 pm »
Quote
Advaita Vedanta and Zen Buddhism: Deconstructive Modes of Spiritual Inquiry
by Leesa S. Davis / A&C Black Publishers (2010) pp. 74-76


According to the Mahayana, all phenomena are empty, unborn, non-dual and possess no self-nature. In the second chapter of the Lanka, the Bodhisattva Mahamati asks the Buddha to elaborate on these four fundamental Mahayana tenets:

Tell me, Blessed One, how all things are empty, unborn, non-dual, and have no self-nature, so that I and other Bodhisattva-Mahasattvas might be awakened in the teaching of emptiness, no-birth, non-duality and the absence of self-nature, and quitting the discrimination of being and non-being, quickly realise the highest enlightenment. (Suzuki, 1999, p. 65)

The Buddha responds by instructing Mahamati to 'listen well and reflect upon what I tell you'.

Emptiness, emptiness, indeed! Mahamati, it is a term whose self-nature is false imagination. Because of one's attachment to false imagination, Mahamati, we have to talk of emptiness, no-birth, non-duality, and absence of self-nature. (Suzuki, 1999, p. 65)

The Buddha begins by refusing to grant the term 'emptiness' any ontological substance. The term 'emptiness' is a concept, with a 'falsely imagined' self-nature, and it is because of attachment to these falsely imagined constructions that we have to talk about emptiness, no-birth, non-duality and absence of self-nature. Here, the Buddha warns Mahamati of the provisional nature of all concepts and the inherent discriminating that is involved in any act of naming. The terms themselves possess no inherent substance and should not be granted any. In short, in a deconstructive move reminiscent of one of the central premises of Nagarjuna's MMK, the Buddha is saying that emptiness as a term is 'empty'.

According to the Buddha, the teaching that 'all things are unborn' does not mean that things are not born but that they are not born of themselves', that is, that they have no intrinsic self-nature that ontologically substantializes them:

To have no self-nature is, according to the deeper sense, to be unborn, Mahamati. That all things are devoid of self-nature means that there is a constant and uninterrupted becoming, a momentary change from one state of existence to another; seeing this, Mahamati, all things are destitute of self-nature. So one speaks of all things having no self-nature. (Suzuki, 1999, p. 67)

To be devoid of self-nature, i.e., to possess no enduring, changeless, substance, is to be in constant, uninterrupted becoming, in momentary change from one state of existence to another. Here the Buddha is describing reality as process and pointing to the basic Buddhist doctrines of anitya (impermanence) and pratityasamutpada (dependent co-origination) in which all phenomena rise and fall in a process of constant change yet in themselves possess no qualities of constancy or essence. Thus, for the Buddha, emptiness, the unborn, and no self-nature are indicators pointing the student to the flux of reality-in-process that, properly understood, cannot be objectified into solid ontological entities. Mahamati has asked the Buddha to explain how all things are 'empty, unborn, non-dual and have no self-nature so that he can stop the discrimination of being and non-being and quickly realize the highest enlightenment'. His question indicates that he has understood that discriminating between being and non-being is what is 'stopping' him from `realizing the highest enlightenment' and that a 'correct' understanding of the 'true' nature of things (i.e., empty, unborn, non-dual, with no self-nature) would dissolve all such obstructive discrimination. There is, however, a subtle objectification of the concepts of emptiness, unborn, and so on, that the Buddha immediately moves to undermine by emphasizing the empty and provisional nature of concepts and the impermanence and constant change of all reality. The `highest enlightenment' is not a 'thing' to be 'grasped' nor is it to be conceived in a dualistic relationship to some kind of unenlightened state. In his articulation of non-duality the Buddha makes this point clear:

[W]hat is meant by non-duality? It means that light and shade, long and short, black and white, are relative terms, Mahamati, and not independent of each other; as Nirvana and Samsara are, all things are not two. There is no Nirvana except where is Samsara; there is no Samsara except where is Nirvana; for the condition of existence is not of mutually-exclusive character. Therefore, it is said that all things are non-dual as are Nirvana and Samsara. (Suzuki, 1999, pp. 67-68)

'All things', says the Buddha, 'are not two.' Here the Buddha details the interdependent nature of all conceptual dualisms including the dualism of nirvana and sainsara; enlightened and unenlightened. That is, reality objectified into polarized dualistic pairings is not 'reality-as-it-is', 'for the condition of existence is not of mutually-exclusive character'. Thus, like all discriminated dichotomies, the concept nirvana cannot exist apart from its counterpart sarpsara. The Buddha has 'answered' Mahamati's question by deconstructing any objectifications he may harbour about liberation itself: liberated knowledge is knowledge free of conceptual distinctions. The undermining of nirvana and samsara as static dualistic entities to be attained or rejected is a pivotal Mahayana Buddhist deconstructive strategy that serves as the cornerstone of the logical demolition of dichotomous views in Nagarjuna's MMK and the deconstructive dynamic behind much of Dogen's phenomenological non-dual expressions.

Offline Roope

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #419 on: March 18, 2015, 01:55:59 am »
Quote
Mahamati has asked the Buddha to explain how all things are 'empty, unborn, non-dual and have no self-nature so that he can stop the discrimination of being and non-being and quickly realize the highest enlightenment'. His question indicates that he has understood that discriminating between being and non-being is what is 'stopping' him from `realizing the highest enlightenment' and that a 'correct' understanding of the 'true' nature of things (i.e., empty, unborn, non-dual, with no self-nature) would dissolve all such obstructive discrimination.

And it's good to remember and understand this very simple fact that discrimination, along with everything else, is only thought and nothing more.

No thought, no problem. But also "No belief and mental involvement in any thoughts whatsoever, no problem.".

 


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