Author Topic: What is Nirvana?  (Read 31935 times)

Offline Solodris

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #435 on: August 10, 2016, 11:28:04 am »
My own personal experience of Nirvana is the meditative attainment of the intellect having unconditional access to a blissful tranquil state of being no longer possessing sensual desires that are ultimately unsatisfactory. Correct me if my perception on this concept is wrong.

Nope. It's a good description of what happened to me too. I might not use those exact words as I can't handle double negatives well, and you really need to use 'not' this and 'not not' that if you are to try to recreate the experience.

Be mindful of māna, I'm autistic and so right speech is difficult. The thing is, I don't need to recreate the experience as it is a constant for me. This is why I asked; Is this Nirvana?

Offline Dairy Lama

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #436 on: August 11, 2016, 12:02:45 am »
My own personal experience of Nirvana is the meditative attainment of the intellect having unconditional access to a blissful tranquil state of being no longer possessing sensual desires that are ultimately unsatisfactory. Correct me if my perception on this concept is wrong.

Nope. It's a good description of what happened to me too. I might not use those exact words as I can't handle double negatives well, and you really need to use 'not' this and 'not not' that if you are to try to recreate the experience.
Be mindful of māna, I'm autistic and so right speech is difficult. The thing is, I don't need to recreate the experience as it is a constant for me. This is why I asked; Is this Nirvana?

Nirvana is not really something that can be diagnosed on the internet, but here is an example of the way it is described in the suttas:

"Here, Ānanda, a bhikkhu thinks thus: ‘This is peaceful, this is sublime, that is, the stilling of all activities, the relinquishing of all acquisitions, the destruction of craving, dispassion, cessation, nibbāna.’"
https://suttacentral.net/en/an3.32

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Offline stillpointdancer

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #437 on: August 11, 2016, 02:36:58 am »
My own personal experience of Nirvana is the meditative attainment of the intellect having unconditional access to a blissful tranquil state of being no longer possessing sensual desires that are ultimately unsatisfactory. Correct me if my perception on this concept is wrong.

Nope. It's a good description of what happened to me too. I might not use those exact words as I can't handle double negatives well, and you really need to use 'not' this and 'not not' that if you are to try to recreate the experience.

Be mindful of māna, I'm autistic and so right speech is difficult. The thing is, I don't need to recreate the experience as it is a constant for me. This is why I asked; Is this Nirvana?

I'm not autistic, and right speech is difficult for me too! I don't usually pass judgments on other people's enlightenment experiences, but if you are asking me whether what you describe is Nirvana, it depends whether you are using in the Hindu sense or the Buddhist sense. As I understand it, the Hindu sense is kind of what you describe. The Buddhist sense, that I find useful, is the moment of enlightenment, the experience of enlightenment being the attainment of Nirvana. In that sense it is possible to attain for fleeting seconds, but not for longer. As soon as you are aware of being there, you no longer are.

However, if you are using Nirvana in the sense of continuing to be there afterwards, it wouldn't agree with my definition, but would be fine for yours. Any more useful definitions of Nirvana to help here?
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Offline Solodris

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #438 on: November 27, 2016, 06:01:49 pm »
The experience of complete spiritual absorption in Samadhi, in my humble perspective, seems to be the final attainment that leads to being reborn as an arhat, since the jhanic absorption seems to cancel out the conditioning of the surrounding environment.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2016, 12:12:48 pm by Solodris »

Offline Solodris

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #439 on: January 14, 2017, 06:31:11 am »
Strike that. Nirvana is the enlightened mind that has attained jhanic meditative powers to come closer to the non-self understanding of dukkha and anicca.

This creates a prajna-paramita which unlocks instinctiual behavior to modify ones own behavior. Then you have the realized retention of the mind of nirvana until you finally reach pari-nibbana.

Offline allanwattsiscool

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #440 on: March 28, 2018, 06:14:17 pm »
nirvana is a rock band from the late eightys duh!!!

all kidding aside. There is no such thing as nirvana. One must step outside the world of concepts to taste nirvana.  but for funsies. I will say nirvana is what happens when an enlightened person decides that they dont want to play the game anymore and they sit under a tree or something and just blow their mind with spiritual power. I would not call nirvana awakening. The 2 are not necessary for eachother in my mind. For fun remember? When we practice, we don't take such things seriously. Remember these words are a raft with which we leave behind when we are done crossing the stream.

Offline Lotusmile

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #441 on: March 28, 2018, 08:44:09 pm »
Basically, taking seeing as an example, when you see the Space in front of you, it does not subject to change since you were born, at age of 20, 30,50, 70 and so forth. Which means your origin sight did not change and not subjected to birth and death, sick or decay. This , i would put it as Nirvana from Buddhism point of view

Offline Lotusmile

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #442 on: March 29, 2018, 05:04:03 am »
In buddhism, basically there are two traditions of Nirvana, the Theravada and Mahayana nirvana. In Theravada, it actualised the emptiness in all forms known as Nirvana. When Buddha actualised supreme nirvana, he went to the Deep Park then to assist the five ascetic practitioners to actualise their preferred state of nirvana known as or labelled as Theravada for purpose of teaching thereafter and future. These five ascetics who had achieved Nirvana were always together with Buddha where he brought them into the real truth state of Nirvana known as or labelled Mahayana for purpose of teaching thereafter and in future.
Theravada in the emptiness of all forms such as form of self, forms of others, forms of sentience and form of time or period. Mahayana on the other hand, not only had actualised the emptiness of all forms, but also dharma emptiness or perception of forms. Emptiness here does not imply nothing at all, there is a state of clarity or tranquility beyond six senses

Offline Lotusmile

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #443 on: April 05, 2018, 12:50:35 am »
When ignorance arises, our nirvana becomes form and non form. Nirvana does not because of ignorance arises disappeared, it is always there. For instance, clouds is liken to ignorance and sunlight is liken to nirvana, when clouds arises, the sunlight which is there could not be flawlessly presence. Without nirvana, there would be not clouds, means clouds and nirvana is one entity. Henceforth, generally compassion and loving kindness or six paramita is a nature in clouds world. Unlike Theravada, it only resides in partial emptiness separating themselves away from clouds

Offline stillpointdancer

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #444 on: April 05, 2018, 04:15:52 am »
My own personal experience of Nirvana is the meditative attainment of the intellect having unconditional access to a blissful tranquil state of being no longer possessing sensual desires that are ultimately unsatisfactory. Correct me if my perception on this concept is wrong.

Nope. It's a good description of what happened to me too. I might not use those exact words as I can't handle double negatives well, and you really need to use 'not' this and 'not not' that if you are to try to recreate the experience.

Be mindful of māna, I'm autistic and so right speech is difficult. The thing is, I don't need to recreate the experience as it is a constant for me. This is why I asked; Is this Nirvana?
Sorry I didn't express myself very well. I was trying to quote the zen expression 'there is neither a God nor not a God', meaning, in the context of this thread, 'there is neither nirvana nor not nirvana'. For me it means that there is not a 'thing' but that the denial of such a 'thing' becomes a 'thing' in itself. Reading this through it's no wonder I have difficulty in expressing myself sometimes, it just goes with the territory!
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Offline Dairy Lama

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #445 on: April 05, 2018, 06:30:52 am »
Basically, taking seeing as an example, when you see the Space in front of you, it does not subject to change since you were born, at age of 20, 30,50, 70 and so forth.

Space tends to be occupied by objects on a regular basis, in which case it is no longer space.   :wink1:
"My religion is very simple - my religion is ice-cream"

Offline Dairy Lama

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #446 on: April 05, 2018, 06:32:35 am »
30 pages in this thread, and still no clear answer to my original question.   :teehee:
"My religion is very simple - my religion is ice-cream"

Offline Lotusmile

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What is Nirvana?
« Reply #447 on: April 05, 2018, 09:27:25 pm »
30 pages in this thread, and still no clear answer to my original question.   :teehee:
Another 30 pages specifically for you and will still no clear answer to your original question, because you are not on your original mind to appreciate it Therefore Buddha is so recommended a simplest achieveable way for you is the Pureland Amitabha way. Bringing along your karma to Pureland to get it tranquils and purifies, in one short lifespan
« Last Edit: April 05, 2018, 09:30:13 pm by Lotusmile »

Offline Dairy Lama

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #448 on: April 06, 2018, 01:19:01 am »
30 pages in this thread, and still no clear answer to my original question.   :teehee:
Another 30 pages specifically for you and will still no clear answer to your original question, because you are not on your original mind to appreciate it Therefore Buddha is so recommended a simplest achieveable way for you is the Pureland Amitabha way. Bringing along your karma to Pureland to get it tranquils and purifies, in one short lifespan

So is your Pureland an actual place? 
"My religion is very simple - my religion is ice-cream"

Offline Anemephistus

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Re: What is Nirvana?
« Reply #449 on: April 07, 2018, 07:34:19 pm »
30 pages in this thread, and still no clear answer to my original question.   :teehee:

Quote
“Whatever can be conceptualized is, therefore, relative, and whatever is relative is Sunya, empty. Since absolute inconceivable truth is also Sunya, Sunyata or the void is shared by both Samsara and Nirvana. Ultimately, Nirvana truly realized is Samsara properly understood.”
-Nagarjuna

Understanding fully that this consciousness as it resides is usually full of knowledge based on contextually defined composites and that "all knowable phenomena without exception are contextually defined composites."  "Understanding" of those composites needs to be sorted in stages. 

I believe this is true because mentally and karmically everything is caught in the momentum of dependent organization and interdependent phenomenon "Because this is, that is". Physically because in the absence of mental perception all matter is a single physical medium which must be measured or contemplated in order to arrive at a conclusion for which there is any differentiation possible, at it's core,  it is simply everything physical.  Energy, it is never created or destroyed, and again it is absent of any differentiation which denotes magnitude or measurement without mental measurement, is is just that which causes motion.

What is left that is not a contextually defined composite? What is known without being realized, understood without thought, what phenomenon  rests outside all Samsaric realms and understanding?

This is the only answer I know of to What is Nirvana: It is what is understood when we see all that is understandable and then we understand it and let go of even the concept of "understand" and the concept of "let go"

 


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