Author Topic: Amida is a real Buddha?  (Read 2246 times)

Offline LetGo

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Re: Amida is a real Buddha?
« Reply #60 on: April 21, 2017, 01:36:52 pm »
Tiger hides are not vegan, which prohibits the use of animal products.
Sounds like someone needs a dictionary.

Offline LetGo

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Re: Amida is a real Buddha?
« Reply #61 on: April 21, 2017, 01:40:31 pm »
Weak argument, the people & cultures were there before the country.
In this one, there is a brahmin cord of hair, showing the cutting off of heterodox non-Buddhist teachings.
Wearing animal skins is not vegan, let alone people skins.

Offline LetGo

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Re: Amida is a real Buddha?
« Reply #62 on: April 21, 2017, 01:43:26 pm »
I really thought stupid would realize that people live in a place LONG before it comes a country.
Stupid is as Fig does apparently.


Offline LetGo

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Re: Amida is a real Buddha?
« Reply #63 on: April 21, 2017, 01:45:15 pm »
Actually all you're doing is making it worse on yourself.
Even if just trolling and having a laugh, the results are going to be baaaaad...
Again, the people getting stomped are followers of Sanatana Dharma...

Offline LetGo

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Re: Amida is a real Buddha?
« Reply #64 on: April 21, 2017, 01:46:46 pm »

Offline Solodris

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Re: Amida is a real Buddha?
« Reply #65 on: April 21, 2017, 02:32:29 pm »
I suppose if we look into the transmigration of phenomena in emptiness, there is a chance that at the flow of karma at some point your bus of consciousness will settle in a cow. This cow grew up on a poor farm in a barn where people have stopped attending the needs of animals. Your fed and brought up with wonderful love when your small and cute, but then the farmer gets bored, buy's technology that binds him to suffer in the house. You start to get hungry moving around looking for your feeder, he never appears, so you start starving, and it is the most horrible suffering you have ever experienced. It takes time to die of starvation too, three days is a very long time spent in suffering, writhing on the ground of stomach aches. Eventually you're too weak to move, and the only thing you experience for a couple of hours, is extreme weakness and stomach pains that make you want to scream. It is so painful you are trying to move faster than you are able to, wriggling around to experience something else but hunger, you can't move any faster, it's too painful to be still.

Then emptiness. Phenomena cross over to the house, and there, the hungry shade of the cow punishes the farmer for creating this suffering, forces him to interact with technology beyond our comprehension, so addicted he eventually dies of exhaustion.

Sometimes when I look at peoples normal problems, they seem just as mad as this, because it is so visible it's painful. Insanity is to choose to go with the norms of society, when we understand how and why to go beyond them, we develop as a species.

The ideal configuration of this planet would be to remove the eco-system and build an artificial infrastructure where only humans are reborn, no more animal incarnation, no more delusion, no more suffering.

Offline LetGo

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Re: Amida is a real Buddha?
« Reply #66 on: April 21, 2017, 02:38:23 pm »
Must be blind as well as dumb if you can't see the enemies of Buddhism (Sanatana Dharma brahmins) getting stepped on in these images...

Offline LetGo

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Re: Amida is a real Buddha?
« Reply #67 on: April 21, 2017, 02:39:47 pm »
Animal birth is considered a lower realm, a birth due to unfavorable causes....

Offline LetGo

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Re: Amida is a real Buddha?
« Reply #68 on: April 21, 2017, 02:43:01 pm »
Hindu Hayagriva is merely a manifestation of Amitabha, just an alternate form if you will...
Just as Avalokitesvara appears to fools who only believe in Vishnu....
More teachers who attempt to teach Sanatana Dharma, enemies of Buddhism getting stepped on:

Offline LetGo

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Re: Amida is a real Buddha?
« Reply #69 on: April 21, 2017, 02:45:35 pm »
As this forum apparently has no mods, I have no trouble posting the 1000+ images of wrathful Buddha Dharma protectors...
Give you a glimpse of what awaits you for attempting to mislead people with counterfeit Dharma...

Offline LetGo

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Re: Amida is a real Buddha?
« Reply #70 on: April 21, 2017, 02:55:01 pm »
Misleading people with counterfeit Dharma is hardly compassionate.
In Buddhism it's right up there with the 5 Grave Sins.
Hence, an attempt at purifying this thread with Dharma Protectors.


Offline LetGo

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Re: Amida is a real Buddha?
« Reply #71 on: April 21, 2017, 02:58:01 pm »
Never ending cycle I guess.
You keep adding diarrhea to the thread and I keep trying to purify it with Dharma images.

Offline LetGo

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Re: Amida is a real Buddha?
« Reply #72 on: April 21, 2017, 03:03:11 pm »
Quote
Virupa became known as one who had not only parted the waters of the Ganges on
two occassions but had also halted the sun in its course for three days. His fame spread
far and wide. Meanwhile he continued his journey to subdue Bhimesara in the south
and to find Krishnacarin, a future disciple who it is said was a suitable candidate for the
'gradual path'. Bhimesara was ruled by a Hindu king named Narapati who was a devotee
of five hundred Yogis with plaited hair. They worshipped at a massive Shivalinga and at
an image of Mahadeva which had been installed by a previous king named Bhayasena.
They sacrificed ten of thousands of buffaloes and goats every year. Virupa arrived among
them and wrote many eulogies to the Shivalinga in Sanskrit. The king was greatly impressed
with his scholarship. He asked him to become the leader of the five hundred Yogis, an offer
which Virupa found difficult to refuse.

   During the regular worshipping ceremonies the Yogis bowed down to the image of
Mahadeva and made flower offerings. While this was going on, Virupa would pull out
a volume of the Prajnaparamita text which he kept tucked in his hair, and pay homage
to it. He never bowed to the image of Mahadeva. The Yogis became suspicious and
reported this behaviour to the king. Instead of paying heed to their allegations, the king
accused the Yogis of jealousy. "He is such a great scholar and master of the Vedas.
It is impossible that such a man does not pay homage to Mahadeva, the king of the gods.
You must be jealous of him," the king replied. However the Yogis kept on reporting
Virupa's behaviour until at last the king decided he must observe the truth himself by
attending one of these ceremonies personally. When he did, Virupa paid his homage to
the Prajnaparamita text as usual. The king was amazed. He addressed Virupa, saying,
"Why are you not bowing down to the image of Mahadeva?" "Why should I?" replied
Virupa. "He cannot bear my homage." The king then said, "There is no one more
powerful than he in the whole desire realm. Why do you say he cannot bear your homage?
You must show your respect." "Since I have no choice but to do what the sinful king
demands of me, you must forgive me," Virupa said to the image. As soon as he placed
his hands together to pay homage and said, "Namo Buddhaya" (I pay homage to the
Buddha), one third of the gigantic image cracked to pieces. When he said, "Namo
Dharmaya" (I pay homage to the Dharma), two thirds of the image cracked and when
he said, "Namo Sanghaya" (I pay homage to the Sangha), the entire figure crumbled
into pieces and fell to the ground.

   The king was shocked. With a mixture of fear and faith, he requested Virupa to restore
the statue. Thereupon Virupa instantly restored it and placed upon a black stone image of
the Great Compassionate One, Avalokiteshvara. He then said to the king, "The statue will
remain intact so long as no one removes the image of Mahakarunika. Should anyone
remove this, this statue will instantly crumble to bits." Then he left. Amongst the five hundred
Yogis was one who was dissatisfied with the behaviour of Tirthikas (heretics). Having
witnessed Virupa's wondrous qualities he developed deep devotion to him and became his
disciple. This was Krishnacharin of the East who, although never previously a follower of
the Buddhadharma, now decided to enter the path.

Offline LetGo

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Re: Amida is a real Buddha?
« Reply #73 on: April 21, 2017, 03:09:35 pm »
Quote
Virupa and his companions continued traveling south. They arrived at a place where
there was a self-arisen image of Goddess Chandika, named Sahajadevi which was
worshipped by many Hindu Yoginis. This shrine had a Trishula (a three pointed ritual
knife) which of its own accord without any human intervention would pierce through
the neck of pilgrims killing them as soon as they entered the shrine. The Yoginis would
then make offerings of flesh and blood to the image. Virupa knew about this and had
come purposely to subdue it. He instructed his two companions to remain outside
and perform special breathing meditation. The Yoginis were delighted to see Virupa
and asked him to bring his two companions inside with him. Virupa said that they
could invite in themselves, if they wished. The Yoginis went and asked the pair to
enter. But neither of them replied. The Yoginis felt the stomachs of the two meditating
disciples. Excrement emerged from wherever they touched. The Yoginis concluded
that the two were already dead and rotten, so left them undisturbed. Virupa had
seen the Trishula knives ready for slaughter and moved very fast as he entered the
shrine. He clapped his hands and the knives were instantly pulverised. Immediately
the image started jumping towards onto its shoulders. All the Yoginis began vomiting
blood and fainting as they saw this unexpected tragedy befall their god. "Aren't you
Buddhists meant to be kind and compassionate to other living beings? Please do not
do this to us," said the Yoginis when they recovered. "It is due to compassion that I
am doing this," replied Virupa.

   He placed a small votive stupa on top of the image and admitted all the Yoginis to
the practice of Buddhadharma. At this time, the boatman Dombi Heruka, who had
been with Virupa since the second parting of the Ganges was blessed to attain the
realization of a Bodhisattva at the level of the Sixth Bhumi. Virupa then sent him to
Rada province in eastern India to subdue an evil Hindu king named Dehara, who
had a palace named Kangkana. Mounted on a pregnant tiger and brandishing a
deadly snake bridle and whip, Mahasiddha Dombi Heruka subdued the king and
his subjects. They were all admitted into the path of Vajrayana.

Offline LetGo

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Re: Amida is a real Buddha?
« Reply #74 on: April 21, 2017, 03:15:07 pm »
Quote
Saraha was a brahmin born in eastern India in an area named Roli in the city-state of Rajni. His mother was a Dakini and he was a Daka, a spiritual being with magical powers. Although raised as a Brahmin and tutored in Brahmin law, he was secretly a Buddhist and had been taught by numerous great masters. He lived a double life, observing Brahmin law during the day and maintaining his Buddhist vows at night. Saraha enjoyed drinking alcohol and this offended the other Brahmins. They told the king of Saraha's drinking and pleaded for him to be exiled. When the king began to chastise him, Saraha stated that he did not drink and that he would gladly prove it to him and all the Brahmins. When they were all assembled, Saraha took out a pot of boiling oil and stated that if he were guilty his hand would burn in it, and then put his hand into the boiling oil and pulled it out unscathed. The Brahmins didn't care and continued to yell vicious insults at him, telling the king they had repeatedly seen him drink with their own eyes. Saraha then took a bowl of molten copper and drank it in one gulp and his throat was not burned. The Brahmins continued to tell the king they had seen him drink. He then challenged the Brahmins, saying he would get into a tank of water with one of them and whoever is guilty will sink to the bottom and when he did, the Brahmin sank and not him. He also stated that he would weigh himself with anyone of them and whoever weighed less was guilty. He weighed himself along with one of the larger Brahmins but still was heavier. The king decided that if he possessed such powers then he should be allowed to continue to drink.

 


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