Poll

Is the Nature of the Buddha human?

Yes
1 (25%)
No
3 (75%)

Total Members Voted: 4

Author Topic: Some questions about the Nature of the Buddhas  (Read 2264 times)

Offline NepalianBuddhist

  • Member
  • Posts: 707
    • View Profile
Some questions about the Nature of the Buddhas
« on: September 07, 2013, 04:48:42 am »
Hello,

I had some questions about the Nature of the Buddhas.

a) Is the nature of a Buddha human? ..

b) Does the Buddha have a human function? Such as drinking or urinating or defecating? ..

c) How is it not an idol? For example, carved statue that is worshipped?...

Thanks.

Offline karmatryk

  • Member
  • Posts: 17
    • View Profile
Re: Some questions about the Nature of the Buddhas
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2013, 05:11:33 am »
At the risk of sounding glib and mystic, which is not my intention, but the answer to your question is YOU, you are the nature of Buddha in human form. It's vitally important to understand this. If there is to be any freedom and tranquility in your life it is the understanding of your contemporary life in terms of  its subjectivity, its mythic narrative of existence as played by YOU: a dynamic, ever-changing, open-ended, impermanent, interdependent process whose true nature is pure, beyond causation and quality. This is when Buddha has a body and experiences Pure land.

Offline Lobster

  • Member
  • Posts: 1341
    • View Profile
Re: Some questions about the Nature of the Buddhas
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2013, 05:22:26 am »
Quote
YOU, you are the nature of Buddha in human form
:jinsyx:

Sounds about right.
Not perfect? Flawed? Only outwardly.
Inside? Nothing perfect, nothing flawed . . . until arising.

Buddha!  :jinsyx:

Offline NepalianBuddhist

  • Member
  • Posts: 707
    • View Profile
Re: Some questions about the Nature of the Buddhas
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2013, 05:50:15 am »
At the risk of sounding glib and mystic, which is not my intention, but the answer to your question is YOU, you are the nature of Buddha in human form. It's vitally important to understand this. If there is to be any freedom and tranquility in your life it is the understanding of your contemporary life in terms of  its subjectivity, its mythic narrative of existence as played by YOU: a dynamic, ever-changing, open-ended, impermanent, interdependent process whose true nature is pure, beyond causation and quality. This is when Buddha has a body and experiences Pure land.

Oh, I see.

How does that answer my question? The inquiry into Buddha-Nature is about the literal nature of the Buddhas. Not the individual self
« Last Edit: September 07, 2013, 06:04:16 am by Wesley1982 »

Offline Spiny Norman

  • Member
  • Posts: 5081
  • Cool baby yeah!
    • View Profile
Re: Some questions about the Nature of the Buddhas
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2013, 06:16:28 am »
a) Is the nature of a Buddha human? ..

Is Buddhahood limited to the human species?

Offline namumahaparinirvanasvaha

  • Member
  • Posts: 770
    • View Profile
Re: Some questions about the Nature of the Buddhas
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2013, 06:17:37 am »
At the risk of sounding glib and mystic, which is not my intention, but the answer to your question is YOU, you are the nature of Buddha in human form. It's vitally important to understand this. If there is to be any freedom and tranquility in your life it is the understanding of your contemporary life in terms of  its subjectivity, its mythic narrative of existence as played by YOU: a dynamic, ever-changing, open-ended, impermanent, interdependent process whose true nature is pure, beyond causation and quality. This is when Buddha has a body and experiences Pure land.

what I highlighted is a contradiction in terms.........if something is beyond Causation then it cannot be ever changing and impermanent

whatever is ever changing and impermanent does so based on  its ever changing causes and conditions. since Enlightenment is unconditioned(beyond causation it is not subject to impermenance......if it was you would be able to lose your nirvana and slip back into suffering.

Offline namumahaparinirvanasvaha

  • Member
  • Posts: 770
    • View Profile
Re: Some questions about the Nature of the Buddhas
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2013, 06:20:27 am »
a) Is the nature of a Buddha human? ..

Is Buddhahood limited to the human species?

I would say NO..............But a creature must have the compacities/Faculties to attain Enlightenment.
unfortunately many living beings faculties are lacking.

Offline karmatryk

  • Member
  • Posts: 17
    • View Profile
Re: Some questions about the Nature of the Buddhas
« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2013, 06:22:43 am »
It is the empty nature itself that allows for Buddha  to be expressed in terms of the finite and the subjective

Offline Ron-the-Elder

  • Member
  • Posts: 4475
  • May all beings live rightly and harmoniously.
    • View Profile
Re: Some questions about the Nature of the Buddhas
« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2013, 06:24:30 am »
Suggest one more option:

o  Don't know.

What Makes an Elder? :
A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

Offline namumahaparinirvanasvaha

  • Member
  • Posts: 770
    • View Profile
Re: Some questions about the Nature of the Buddhas
« Reply #9 on: September 07, 2013, 06:32:54 am »
It is the empty nature itself that allows for Buddha  to be expressed in terms of the finite and the subjective
Empty Nature as in how???

[Nirvana sutra] CHAPTER TWELVE: ON THE TATHAGATA-DHATU
V417.   “Kasyapa said to the Buddha: "O World-Honoured One! Is there Self in the 25 existences or not?" The Buddha said: "O good man! "Self" means "Tathagatagarbha" [Buddha-Womb, Buddha-Embryo, Buddha-Nature]. Every being has Buddha-Nature. This is the Self. Such Self has, from the very beginning, been under cover of innumerable defilements. That is why man cannot see it.
 V135.   Even though he has said that all phenomena [dharmas] are devoid of the Self, it is not that they are completely/ truly devoid of the Self. What is this Self? Any phenomenon [dharma] that is true [satya], real [tattva], eternal [nitya], sovereign/ autonomous/ self-governing [aisvarya], and whose ground/ foundation is unchanging [asraya-aviparinama], is termed 'the Self' [atman]. This is as in the case of the great Doctor who well understands the milk medicine. The same is the case with the Tathagata. For the sake of beings, he says "there is the Self in all things" O you the four classes! Learn Dharma thus!"

Offline karmatryk

  • Member
  • Posts: 17
    • View Profile
Re: Some questions about the Nature of the Buddhas
« Reply #10 on: September 07, 2013, 06:51:01 am »
Empty nature in the sense that emptiness also is EMPTY OF INHERENT EXISTENCE. Remember, form is emptiness, emptiness is form. Having no fixed nature means just that, allowing for the expression of empty nature in the infinite manifestation of form and in that expression is not other than emptiness

Offline namumahaparinirvanasvaha

  • Member
  • Posts: 770
    • View Profile
Re: Some questions about the Nature of the Buddhas
« Reply #11 on: September 07, 2013, 06:59:17 am »
Empty nature in the sense that emptiness also is EMPTY OF INHERENT EXISTENCE. Remember, form is emptiness, emptiness is form. Having no fixed nature means just that, allowing for the expression of empty nature in the infinite manifestation of form and in that expression is not other than emptiness

ahhhhh but Enlightenment is unborn and uncreated and unconditioned...........therefore its existence is not dependent upon  anything else....being uncreated it exists Inherently
 Enlightenment being an Inherent existence it is unborn and inherently pure(never tainted)
Buddha nature is the very teaching of the Inherent existence of Enlightenment.

[Queen Srimala Sutra] 8-9. The Dharmakaya and the Meaning of Void-ness
"Lord, the cessation of suffering is not the destruction of Dharma. Why so? Because the Dharmakaya of the Tathágata is named 'cessation of suffering,' and it is beginning-less, un-create, unborn, undying, free from death; permanent, steadfast, calm, eternal; intrinsically pure, free from all the defilement-store; and accompanied by Buddha natures more numerous than the sands of the Ganges, which are non-discrete, knowing as liberated, and inconceivable. This Dharmakaya of the Tathágata when not free from the store of defilement is referred to as the Tathágata-garbha.

Offline karmatryk

  • Member
  • Posts: 17
    • View Profile
Re: Some questions about the Nature of the Buddhas
« Reply #12 on: September 07, 2013, 07:21:42 am »
THE HEART SUTRA

Om Homage to the Perfection of Wisdom the Lovely, the Holy !

Avalokita, the Holy Lord and Bodhisattva, was moving in the deep course of the Wisdom which has gone beyond.

He looked down from on high, He beheld but five heaps, and He saw that in their own-being they were empty.

Here, O Sariputra,

form is emptiness and the very emptiness is form ;

emptiness does not differ from form, form does not differ from emptiness, whatever is emptiness, that is form,

the same is true of feelings, perceptions, impulses, and consciousness.

Here, O Sariputra,

all dharmas are marked with emptiness ;

they are not produced or stopped, not defiled or immaculate, not deficient or complete.

Therefore, O Sariputra,

in emptiness there is no form nor feeling, nor perception, nor impulse, nor consciousness ;

No eye, ear, nose, tongue, body, mind ; No forms, sounds, smells, tastes, touchables or objects of mind ; No sight-organ element, and so forth, until we come to :

No mind-consciousness element ; There is no ignorance, no extinction of ignorance, and so forth, until we come to : There is no decay and death, no extinction of decay and death. There is no suffering, no origination, no stopping, no path.

There is no cognition, no attainment and no non-attainment.

Therefore, O Sariputra,

it is because of his non-attainmentness that a Bodhisattva, through having relied on the Perfection of Wisdom, dwells without thought-coverings. In the absence of thought-coverings he has not been made to tremble,

he has overcome what can upset, and in the end he attains to Nirvana.

All those who appear as Buddhas in the three periods of time fully awake to the utmost, right and perfect Enlightenment because they have relied on the Perfection of Wisdom.

Therefore one should know the prajnaparamita as the great spell, the spell of great knowledge, the utmost spell, the unequalled spell, allayer of all suffering, in truth -- for what could go wrong ? By the prajnaparamita has this spell been delivered. It runs like this :

gate gate paragate parasamgate bodhi svaha.

( Gone, gone, gone beyond, gone altogether beyond, O what an awakening, all-hail ! -- )

This completes the Heart of perfect Wisdom.

Offline namumahaparinirvanasvaha

  • Member
  • Posts: 770
    • View Profile
Re: Some questions about the Nature of the Buddhas
« Reply #13 on: September 07, 2013, 07:27:51 am »
and where in the Heart Sutra does it say that emptiness means not having any Inherent existence??

(it doesn't...in fact it upholds that whatever is changing/conditioned and dependently existent is defiled)

Offline namumahaparinirvanasvaha

  • Member
  • Posts: 770
    • View Profile
Re: Some questions about the Nature of the Buddhas
« Reply #14 on: September 07, 2013, 07:43:39 am »
Quote
karmatryk
THE HEART SUTRA
all dharmas are marked with emptiness ;

they are not produced or stopped, not defiled or immaculate, not deficient or complete.
No mind-consciousness element ; There is no ignorance, no extinction of ignorance, and so forth, until we come to : There is no decay and death, no extinction of decay and death. There is no suffering, no origination, no stopping, no path.
There is no cognition, no attainment and no non-attainment.

I got to go to bed brother but check it out.
if something has NO Inherent existence that means it does not inherently exist and its existence is dependent upon something else.

so the next question is to ask if enlightenment is not inherently existent than what is it dependent upon for its existence????

but you find out from asking this question that Enlightenment  is not something that is produced and has no origination...now since it has no origination it exists inherently (not born,not created and not produced from something else hence this rules out dependently existent)

also Buddha nature is taught to be the Not-Empty Emptiness(hope that doesn't confuse,I can quote the sutras for you on the topic)

 


SimplePortal 2.3.3 © 2008-2010, SimplePortal