Author Topic: The Buddhist attitude of Mind  (Read 1759 times)

Offline NepalianBuddhist

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The Buddhist attitude of Mind
« on: January 23, 2014, 01:13:21 pm »
In Chapter 1 of 'What the Buddha taught' the author Rahula discusses the Buddhist attitude of mind according to the rest of the book. Does it mean  the mind according to Buddhist tradition? It goes on to discuss the 4 noble truths as well as the life story of Buddha. I'm not sure what it does other than give incensive power to the mind and its development. How we should think and practice in Buddhist terms.  :dharma: How far does this go in terms of training the mind through meditation? ...


Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: The Buddhist attitude of Mind
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2014, 03:57:34 am »
Hi, Wesley,

  I have seen two interpretations of mind as a result of my Buddhist studies:

1.  According to the Theravadan Tradition:  The mind is but a container much like a bottle , which holds all of the mental factors, including thoughts, memories, feelings, emotions, ideas, and all of the six sensory consciousnesses.  Then there is the integrator and the observer. It ceases to exist after death.

2. In some Mahayana traditions, much of the same with the exception that it is what moves on to the next life-form after death.  I will not say which Mahayana traditions, because when I do so, I always upset someone, so I will let them speak for themselves.   :-P

What Makes an Elder? :
A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

Offline former monk john

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Re: The Buddhist attitude of Mind
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2014, 04:22:55 am »
The basic unproven question is does the consciousness(mind) exist as a resident of the brain, like birds sitting in a tree(the tree being the physical brain), or is the brain itself the sum total of actual consciousness, in which case it would seem all that would end at death.

Personally I couldn't exist in a world where all of me is simply a function of neurons firing in my brain, but many people especially secular buddhists are quite happy with that idea.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2014, 07:02:40 am by former monk john »
to me, the signs of a successful practice are happiness and a cessation of suffering, buddhism often gives me this; not all the answers.

Offline NepalianBuddhist

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Re: The Buddhist attitude of Mind
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2014, 07:53:18 am »
The subject of Buddhist attitude of Mind is discussed in Chapter 1 of the book - Here's the link:http://www.dhammaweb.net/books/Dr_Walpola_Rahula_What_the_Buddha_Taught.pdf ...

Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: The Buddhist attitude of Mind
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2014, 08:20:33 am »


Quote
He said that there was no esoteric doctrine in his teaching, nothing hidden in
the 'closed-fist of the teacher', or to put it in other words, there never was anything
'up his sleeve'. The freedom of thought allowed by the Buddha is unheard of
elsewhere in the history of religions. This freedom is necessary because, according to
the Buddha, man's emancipation depends on his own realization of Truth, and not on
the benevolent grace of a god or any external power as a reward for his obedient
good behaviour.

Thank you for the post, Wesley.  I love this quotation and think of it constantly when certain traditions talk about their "secret teachings" that Buddha gave only to them.  When I hear that I just shake my head and have compassion for both the teachers and students who buy into that crap. :dharma:
What Makes an Elder? :
A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

Offline NepalianBuddhist

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Re: The Buddhist attitude of Mind
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2014, 02:43:15 pm »
So, .. What do you feel are key Buddhist texts?..

Offline Marcus Epicurus

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Re: The Buddhist attitude of Mind
« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2014, 04:19:34 pm »
So, .. What do you feel are key Buddhist texts?..

Dear NepalianBuddhist,

I am sorry if I dont understand your question correctly, but are you asking which are the "key" early Pali texts or to "key" writings of modern teachers?
The non-doing of any evil,
the performance of what's skillful,
the cleansing of one's own mind:
this is the teaching of the Awakened.

Offline NepalianBuddhist

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Re: The Buddhist attitude of Mind
« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2014, 05:18:23 pm »
So, .. What do you feel are key Buddhist texts?..

Dear NepalianBuddhist,

I am sorry if I dont understand your question correctly, but are you asking which are the "key" early Pali texts or to "key" writings of modern teachers?

The key texts which flow from Buddha teaching the Dharma.

Offline Marcus Epicurus

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Re: The Buddhist attitude of Mind
« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2014, 05:30:23 pm »
So, .. What do you feel are key Buddhist texts?..


Dear NepalianBuddhist,

I am sorry if I dont understand your question correctly, but are you asking which are the "key" early Pali texts or to "key" writings of modern teachers?


The key texts which flow from Buddha teaching the Dharma.


To me, its the Dhammapada, because it is it consists of short teachings of The Buddha that are easy to understand and put into practice.

Here is a link - Hope this helps
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/kn/dhp/

I prefer the Thanissaro  translation as for me it is easier to understand
The non-doing of any evil,
the performance of what's skillful,
the cleansing of one's own mind:
this is the teaching of the Awakened.

Offline francis

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Re: The Buddhist attitude of Mind
« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2014, 11:45:42 pm »
Hi NepalianBuddhist,

There is a lot in that Chapter 1 - The Buddhist Attitude of Mind. The important bit for me is saddha, in that regard I have no trouble understanding the First Noble Truth. 

“Almost all religions are built on faith - rather 'blind' faith it would seem. But in Buddhism emphasis is laid on 'seeing', knowing, understanding, and not on faith, or belief. In Buddhist texts there is a word saddha (Skt.sraddha) which is usually translated as 'faith' or 'belief'. But saddha is not 'faith' as such, but rather 'confidence' bone out of conviction. In popular Buddhism and also in ordinary usage in the texts the word saddha, it must be admitted, has an element of 'faith' in the sense that it signifies devotion to the Buddha, the Dhamma (Teaching) and the Sangha (The Order).

According to Asanga, the great Buddhist philosopher of the 4th century A.C., sraddha has three aspects: (1) full and firm conviction that a thing is, (2) serene joy at good qualities, and (3) aspiration or wish to achieve an object in view. However you put it, faith or belief as understood by most religions has little to do with Buddhism. The question of belief arises when there is no seeing - seeing in every sense of the word.

The moment you see, the question of belief disappears. If I tell you that I have a gem hidden in the folded palm of my hand, the question of belief arises because you do not see it yourself. But if I unclench my fist and show you the gem, then you see it for yourself, and the question of belief does not arise. So the phrase in ancient Buddhist texts reads 'Realizing, as one sees a gem in the palm'.”


"Enlightenment, for a wave in the ocean, is the moment the wave realises it is water." - Thich Nhat Hanh

Offline francis

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Re: The Buddhist attitude of Mind
« Reply #10 on: January 31, 2014, 11:52:48 pm »
The basic unproven question is does the consciousness(mind) exist as a resident of the brain, like birds sitting in a tree(the tree being the physical brain), or is the brain itself the sum total of actual consciousness, in which case it would seem all that would end at death.

Personally I couldn't exist in a world where all of me is simply a function of neurons firing in my brain, but many people especially secular buddhists are quite happy with that idea.

The mind is just our memories, simply a function of neurons.  The problems start when we imagine we are more than just human beings, more than the sum of our parts, and we become attached to that belief. 
"Enlightenment, for a wave in the ocean, is the moment the wave realises it is water." - Thich Nhat Hanh

Offline former monk john

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Re: The Buddhist attitude of Mind
« Reply #11 on: February 01, 2014, 12:05:17 am »
As usual, this is just you're opinion, which your ego likes to state as fact........
to me, the signs of a successful practice are happiness and a cessation of suffering, buddhism often gives me this; not all the answers.

Offline Dharmakara

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Re: The Buddhist attitude of Mind
« Reply #12 on: February 01, 2014, 12:31:23 am »
Actually, that's not  Francis' opinion, but the current scientific research, namely that activating a tiny number of neurons can conjure an entire memory:

http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/conjuring-memories-artificially-0322.html

Offline former monk john

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Re: The Buddhist attitude of Mind
« Reply #13 on: February 01, 2014, 12:43:00 am »
The same science that denies rebirth and and any afterlife??? Like I said these things are still opinions and I stated both sides of the arguement, you guys are only presenting one side.
to me, the signs of a successful practice are happiness and a cessation of suffering, buddhism often gives me this; not all the answers.

Offline Dharmakara

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Re: The Buddhist attitude of Mind
« Reply #14 on: February 01, 2014, 12:46:04 am »
In typical form, you didn't bother reading the article, which makes me wonder who's ego is doing the talking here.

 


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