Author Topic: Amida Buddha and the Pure Land  (Read 4213 times)

Offline Namaste253

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Re: Amida Buddha and the Pure Land
« Reply #60 on: July 23, 2015, 01:46:47 am »
Is there any similarity between Biblical fundamentalism and Pure Land fundamentalism? Insisting that Dharmakara attained Buddhahood billions and billions of years before the Big Bang on a world billions of light years beyond the known universe, and then manifested the Western Pure Land by his own Vow-power, and that anyone who doesn't believe this is without shinjin, reminds me of creationists who insist that the universe is six thousand years old and Noah's ark explains dinosaur fossils.

I'm not trying to demean anyone's sincerely held religious beliefs, but the insistence that we must ignore scientific observation for the sake of literal belief in ancient texts, and that we don't have any other option otherwise we aren't truly saved, seems antithetical to the spirit of Buddhism. I'm sorry if I am offending anyone in sharing this, and I think it only applies to a vocal minority in Pure Land Buddhism today, just as as creationists are a vocal minority of the world's Christians.

Until relatively recently, Tibetan Buddhists believed that the earth is flat with Mount Meru at the center, and now the Dalai Lama recognizes this was not literally true, for obvious reasons. True and sincere religion should have nothing to fear in scientific discovery, and neither should one viewpoint be forced on another if we are all links in Amida's golden chain.

Offline cosmic_dog_magic

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Re: Amida Buddha and the Pure Land
« Reply #61 on: July 23, 2015, 11:43:45 am »
here and there, there are immeasurable references to time and space in teachings, it's relative, product of mind and the sense of them changes as well, there are meditations on them.  I don't think Buddhism is without it's cheeky exaggeration.

Offline Namaste253

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Re: Amida Buddha and the Pure Land
« Reply #62 on: July 23, 2015, 12:51:22 pm »
In the Dhammapada, the Buddha says that better is it for a person to live one day in contemplation and a settled mind than it is to live for a hundred years in idleness and delusion.

This reminds me of when Shinran says that all one needs is to say the Nembutsu once with a sincere mind in order to be born in the Pure Land. The original meaning of Nembutsu is mindfulness of the Buddha.

Offline Namaste253

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Re: Amida Buddha and the Pure Land
« Reply #63 on: July 23, 2015, 02:15:54 pm »
here and there, there are immeasurable references to time and space in teachings, it's relative, product of mind and the sense of them changes as well, there are meditations on them.  I don't think Buddhism is without it's cheeky exaggeration.

Since the Buddha refused to answer the question of whether the universe had a beginning or is eternal, I think it might be best to defer to what science says about the origin and age of the universe.

 


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