Author Topic: Pure land and the later Nalanda Masters  (Read 875 times)

Offline tenzintharpa

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Pure land and the later Nalanda Masters
« on: October 28, 2016, 06:31:59 am »
Hello alll,
Does pure land Buddhism study the university of Nalanda's later masters? in particular, the work of Shantideva?  :anjali: prayers
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Offline LetGo

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Re: Pure land and the later Nalanda Masters
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2016, 12:30:08 pm »
Depends on which Pure Land Buddhists you're talking about.

Around the 8th to 11th centuries CE, China had strong enough domestic lineages that they stopped importing Indian Buddhism. Even by the 7th Century, Chinese pilgrimage sites like Wutaishan were even well known & visited by Buddhists from India. Before the 8th Century CE, China already had its own Pure Land lineage firmly entrenched. In fact, the last major Indian influence on East Asian Pure Land Buddhism was in the 5th century CE via the translator Bodhiruci (who converted defacto Chinese Pure Land founder Tan Luan) and the writings of Vasubandhu. 

I imagine later Nalanda philosophers had a greater effect on the Pure Land practices in Tibet.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2016, 02:34:51 pm by LetGo »

Offline LetGo

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Re: Pure land and the later Nalanda Masters
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2017, 08:51:16 am »
To address some concerns:

Nagarjuna's Chapter on the Easy Path from his Daśabhūmika Vibhāsā - the commentary on the Daśabhūmika sūtra portion of the Avatamsaka sūtra is actually a primary canonical source in East Asian Pure Land.

Also a primary canonical source in East Asian Pure Land is Vasubandhu's Upadeśa on the Sūtra of Amitāyus Buddha.

Shandao (Zendo Daishi) becomes a primary voice in East Asian Pure Land between 613 and 681 CE, basing much of his doctrine on the 2 aforementioned documents.

Shantideva didn't come along until the 8th century CE, by which time much of Pure Land doctrine was already set. Rather than Shantideva's Bodhisattvacaryāvatāra, most of East Asian Mahayana instead bases their concepts of the Bodhisattva path on the Mahāyāna śraddhotpādaśāstra (Awakening of faith in the Mahayana) attributed to Aśvaghoṣa, which dates to the mid 6th century CE.

As you can see, accusations of racism are completely specious insults propagated by an obvious troll.

Online IdleChater

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Re: Pure land and the later Nalanda Masters
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2017, 09:04:24 am »

As you can see, accusations of racism are completely specious insults propagated by an obvious troll.

So it would seem.

 


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