Author Topic: Question about Buddha Monastery or Campgrounds  (Read 1851 times)

Offline Chaz

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Re: Question about Buddha Monastery or Campgrounds
« Reply #15 on: April 11, 2019, 07:27:17 pm »
Can you join the Campgrounds to Buddhist monastery? . . .

What's the point?

Most monasteries have facilities to accomodate guests on a limited basis.  If you want to take up residence on a more permanent basis, you can apply for ordination. 

Offline MarasAndBuddhas

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Re: Question about Buddha Monastery or Campgrounds
« Reply #16 on: April 12, 2019, 10:25:29 am »
Many monasteries/temples/meditations centers give you all the information you need to know on the website, some will have an expected donation, other's only seek thoroughly voluntary donations. I've found that most serious buddhist centers will want you to come for small dosages of the meditation before they will accept you as an actual monk.

I would personally avoid anything that seems too unprincipled and new-agey :teehee: Find some real buddhist! These are usually in a privately owned building opened to the public, i've never heard of buddhist centers on "public grounds", that type of thing is usually just meant for conservation centers.

Offline Chaz

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Re: Question about Buddha Monastery or Campgrounds
« Reply #17 on: April 12, 2019, 10:47:14 am »
Many monasteries/temples/meditations centers give you all the information you need to know on the website, some will have an expected donation, other's only seek thoroughly voluntary donations. I've found that most serious buddhist centers will want you to come for small dosages of the meditation before they will accept you as an actual monk.

I would personally avoid anything that seems too unprincipled and new-agey :teehee: Find some real buddhist! These are usually in a privately owned building opened to the public, i've never heard of buddhist centers on "public grounds", that type of thing is usually just meant for conservation centers.

Good info!

Some years ago, I made plans to make a pilgrimage to Bodhgaya in India.  One of the options for accomodations was various monasteries  in the area.  Many, if not all were geared up to accomodate tourists and pilgrims.  I didn't notice anything saying you had to take temporary vows, but you did have to abide by certain rules within the monastery itself (silence, diet, etc.).  There were expectations of offering for accomodation (nothing unfair).  There are other options such as retreat centers, guest houses, and hotels, too, and they were close to monasteries, where you could go for various practices.

In the west, monasteries are not that common, but most will accomodate people  who wish to go into retreat.  Many will have a  minimum stay, like a week, and of a room or hermitage, meals, etc.

I found a Trappist Monastery in Colorado that would support a Buddhist retreat.

Offline MarasAndBuddhas

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Re: Question about Buddha Monastery or Campgrounds
« Reply #18 on: April 13, 2019, 08:44:59 am »
Thanks chaz! :jinsyx:

If you live in the eastern united states, there's a great monastary in west virginia called the Bhavana Society. They accept everyone as long as you let them know that you are coming, i have this on my bucket list even though i haven't gone there myself. If you are just coming for the day, they expect you to come between 2 and 4pm. There are also other rules and such that you can find on their website.

Buddhist rules are not meant to tie you down or make you a servant to buddhism, even though this is unfortunately what happens. All places of meditation are meant to be quiet and free from the stupid hedonism that is encountered in modern society. For example, most serious Buddha centers  do not have the internet.

Where ever you go, it's important to respect your hosts unless they do not respect their guests
 :anjali:

Offline Chaz

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Re: Question about Buddha Monastery or Campgrounds
« Reply #19 on: April 13, 2019, 12:23:49 pm »
Thanks chaz! :jinsyx:

If you live in the eastern united states, there's a great monastary in west virginia called the Bhavana Society.


I've heard of it. It's west of Washington DC in West Virgina.  That's about 6 hours north of me.

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They accept everyone as long as you let them know that you are coming, i have this on my bucket list even though i haven't gone there myself.

Me either.  It seems like a long way to go for a few hours meditation, and an extended retreat isn't in the cards right now.

A fellow who posted on NewBuddhist was ordained there a few years ago.  He used to post occaisionally after he took up robes, but I haven't seen him post recently.  There could be a number of reasons

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If you are just coming for the day, they expect you to come between 2 and 4pm. There are also other rules and such that you can find on their website.

Centers always have their rules.  I used retreat at Varjra Vidya in Colorado.  While not a monastery, there were monks who presided over the community there.  The house rules tended to reflect monastic rules but not entirely.  We had an evening meal, but the monks didn't join in.  There was an evening group practice and they'd join us for tea afterwards.  WE had to maintain silence except for certain times like evening tea.


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For example, most serious Buddha centers  do not have the internet.

That may be so, but VV had wifi.  Yes it was a distraction.


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Where ever you go, it's important to respect your hosts unless they do not respect their guests

True.

 


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