Author Topic: Hello  (Read 2416 times)

Offline Jamiecon

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Hello
« on: June 02, 2016, 08:41:57 am »
My name is Jamie, and I'm brand new here. I'm a 64 year old man, retired, who lives in the US. Have been flirting with Buddhism for about 25 years, but only recently began to understand it as a way to help me grow and change as a human being. I am meditating daily and I take long walks daily as well, on which I practice mindfulness. I follow Thich Naht Hahn, and I am getting a lot from his book, The Heart of the Buddha's Teaching. His explanation of habit energy has resonated stronngly with me.I recognize those energies in myself. I have joined a community of mindfulness group locally, and I am hoping that this forum will be a good adjunct to that. I am a pretty shy person, so I believe that I will be able to ask questions here before I have the courage to sol them in those face to face meetings. Staying in the present is hard for me, as I'm sure it is for most new meditators, but I will keep at it.I am hopeful that my practice will broaden, a and I look forward to the day when I meet the person who will become my teacher. Until then, I find lessons everywhere.

Offline stillpointdancer

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Re: Hello
« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2016, 03:27:51 am »
Hi Jamie
I think that many cultures see that retirement is a good time to further explore spiritual practice. In terms of your introduction, a few friends of mine would regularly go to listen to Thich Naht Hahn when he was taking retreats here in the UK. He impressed them so much that they stopped going to the group were were in at the time, the Tiratna Order, to follow him instead. I guess I'm too interested in all aspects of meditation and Buddhism to do something like that! Good luck in your practice.
Phil (stillpointdancer- a description of what happens to me sometimes during insight)
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Offline Jamiecon

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Re: Hello
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2016, 10:07:07 am »
Thank you for your welcome Phil. I am blessed to live in an area that has several different Buddhist temples and meditation centers. Thich Naht Hahn's teaching resonates with me, but I plan to attend groups in other forms of Buddhism as well, to avail myself of the Dharma there as well.

Offline stillpointdancer

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Re: Hello
« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2016, 06:20:16 am »
Good plan. I was told not to 'cherry pick' from different groups, but how else do you find a version of the Dharma that helps your practice?
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Offline Ron-the-Elder

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Re: Hello
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2016, 01:30:43 am »
Hi, Jamie.

Welcome to FreeSangha.  I also started with Tich Nat Hahn when I was in Hue, Vietnam just before the war warmed-up (The First Tet Offensive ).  My path took me from Zen to Tibetan, to Theravadin, where I have found a home since 1998.  My suggestion would be to study the documentation of Buddha's words first, then the commentaries by various followers both current and historical, and then to apply what you learn to verify and validate what you learn for yourself.

"The Dhamma is The Dhamma, no matter what the source."...including, most importantly, what you personally discover.
What Makes an Elder? :
A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
But one in whom there is truth, restraint, rectitude, gentleness,self-control, he's called an elder, his impurities disgorged, enlightened.
-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

 


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