Author Topic: love languages  (Read 4231 times)

Offline katersy

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love languages
« on: February 25, 2010, 11:30:26 am »
I know this is kinda unrelated to the dharma, but hey...

Anyone else here a language enthusiast? I love languages and I love learning them. I'm currently learning Polish, which is incredibly difficult. It has seven grammatical cases (if you don't know what that means - just trust me, it means it's difficult!!) and the pronunciation is just...weird.. like szczyzzzrzscscssszzzzz all the time.

Anyway, what fascinates me about language is the fact that despite them being so complicated and intricate, the human brain has the capacity to store all those crazy rules, exceptions, words, spellings, pronunciation, nuances of meaning, etc. It really makes me realise how complex and impressive our brains are.

Plus, I get off on learning different case endings. I'm currently on the "genitive" case. I really do find tables of conjugations and verb endings beautiful! Call me a freak...

"Everything has been figured out, except how to live."

"She believed in nothing; Only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist."

Offline Wonky Badger

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Re: love languages
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2010, 03:07:14 pm »
You like Polish to?! I haven't actually gotten around to the learning part. I tried a Pimsleur course and it kind of put me off a bit. I just picked up a few words and phrases during my trips there, and I bought a small dictionary at a second hand shop a few days ago.

I've put more effort in learning Finnish and Japanese. Finnish since I live in Finland and Japanese because I always had a thing for Japan.

Usually when I go to another country I try to listen and read as much as I can to learn about the language they speak there. Before going to Russia I learnt the Cyrillic alphabet. I tried the same with Hebrew before going to Israel, but that turned out to be a bit harder than expected. Overhearing conversations, you can pretty easily figure out words like yes and no, hi and bye after a while. I learned most of my English from watching DJ Kat Show and Fun Factory on Sky Channel when I was a kid.
My actions are my only true belongings.
I cannot escape the consequences of my actions.
My actions are the ground on which I stand.
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What would Buddha do?

Offline DJ Rheus

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Re: love languages
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2010, 04:30:48 pm »
I love languages too. Philology for the win!
I speak English and Latin, and am working on Tibetan. I start Japanese this fall.


DJ Rheus

Offline lowonthetotem

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Re: love languages
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2010, 09:12:25 am »
I studied linguistics in college, mainly as a way to learn how to create more verbally enticing poetry.  An understanding of phonemes should be in the tool bag of every aspiring poet, as poetry is meant to be heard.  I enjoyed it a great deal.  I also studied French and Spanish, although these days, if I try to speak either, it comes out like Spancais.

I started to teach myself Japanese using this website but did not get very far.  It is still a cool resource, though.

http://www.learnjapanesefree.com/

I also, have some CD's for my computer for leanring Cantonese Chinese.  Again, I haven't done much with them, though.

I do more reading than writing these days, so my interest in language has waned a little.

Offline heybai

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Re: love languages
« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2010, 06:50:09 am »
6,000 Languages: An Embattled Heritage
http://www.unesco.org/courier/2000_04/uk/doss01.htm

Ten languages die out each year. International action is needed to counter this erosion of cultural diversity

Are the vast majority of languages doomed to die out in the near future? Specialists reckon that no language can survive unless 100,000 people speak it. Half of the 6,000 or so languages in the world today are spoken by fewer than 10,000 people and a quarter by less than 1,000. Only a score are spoken by hundreds of millions of people.
The death of languages is not a new phenomenon. Since languages diversified, at least 30,000 (some say as many as half a million) of them have been born and disappeared, often without leaving any trace. Languages usually have a relatively short life span as well as a very high death rate. Only a few, including Basque, Egyptian, Chinese, Greek, Hebrew, Latin, Persian, Sanskrit and Tamil, have lasted more than 2,000 years.

[Follow link above for the entire text]



Offline jay

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Re: love languages
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2010, 07:39:54 pm »
 i too love languages (trying to learn Russian these days)..I feel a new language  is like a new breath ...and without a language i feel something  like suffocation.......................
                                                           metta

Offline Sunya

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Re: love languages
« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2011, 11:18:05 am »
Anyway, what fascinates me about language is the fact that despite them being so complicated and intricate, the human brain has the capacity to store all those crazy rules, exceptions, words, spellings, pronunciation, nuances of meaning, etc. It really makes me realise how complex and impressive our brains are.

Learning a new language is almost like learning to think in a new way, one that is completely different from that with which we're already familiar, especially if the language is far removed in relation from one's mother-tongue.

The assumptions that come attached to language, individual words, and grammar taint all verbal communication and quite frequently the thoughts we have in our daily lives. Certain words from the perspective of certain languages come with a lot of baggage attached to them, such as "faith", "worship", and others similar to them in English due to the ways these words have been used in English-speaking cultures. As is well known, some languages contain words for which there is no equivalent in other languages, and certain languages contain an abundance of words for the same thing because of the importance of that thing to the culture around which the language developed.

I've been studying Mandarin Chinese for a year and a half. It is certainly an exercise in perspective for the mind. Chinese has no alphabet, but there are radicals and parts of each character that can serve as indicators of the word's meaning. It also seems to have a rather strict word-order pattern. Time phrases must be placed at the beginning of a sentence or immediately after the first pronoun. There are other differences in terms of individual words and compounds. Learning a new language has really fostered my interest in languages in general, both from a cognitive and cultural perspective.

Offline dhammaseeker51

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Re: love languages
« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2011, 03:52:37 am »
"Love Languages"

Isn't French supposed to be the language of love?

 ;D

 


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