Author Topic: Are all buddhist sects Mahayana?  (Read 658 times)

Offline MarasAndBuddhas

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Are all buddhist sects Mahayana?
« on: June 25, 2019, 04:55:49 am »
So, after studying this stuff a little after the past 6 months, i found out at one point that there is no "hinayana" buddhist temple because that just means practicing without the help of anyone else. Does this imply that every buddhist set sits under the "Mahayana" umbrella, or does mahayana have it's own rule set for monks distinct from all the others?
 :grouphug:

Offline Pixie

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Re: Are all buddhist sects Mahayana?
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2019, 09:36:52 am »
So, after studying this stuff a little after the past 6 months, i found out at one point that there is no "hinayana" buddhist temple because that just means practicing without the help of anyone else. Does this imply that every buddhist set sits under the "Mahayana" umbrella, or does mahayana have it's own rule set for monks distinct from all the others?



There is no such thing as "Hinayana" in Buddhism. Please check these links:

http://www.urbandharma.org/pdf/NoHinayana.pdf

http://jocbs.org/index.php/jocbs/article/view/72/92

I don't know where you've got the idea from that Theravada temples or monasteries don't give any help or teachings to lay people either, because they certainly do in my country.


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May all beings have happiness and the causes of happiness.
May they all be free from suffering and the causes of suffering.
May they never be deprived of true happiness devoid of any suffering.
May they abide in great impartiality, free from attachment to loved ones and aversion to others.

Offline stevie

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Re: Are all buddhist sects Mahayana?
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2019, 09:46:26 pm »
So, after studying this stuff a little after the past 6 months, i found out at one point that there is no "hinayana" buddhist temple because that just means practicing without the help of anyone else. Does this imply that every buddhist set sits under the "Mahayana" umbrella, or does mahayana have it's own rule set for monks distinct from all the others?
 :grouphug:

Dear IgnoringTheAversion,

it seems you are confusing 'hinayana' and the vehicle of the pratyekabuddha.

Generally the term 'hinayana' should be avoided because it is a derogative term often used  by Mahayana sectarians to disparage the vehicle of the Hearers (= Sravakas)' which is so called to differentiate it from the 'vehicle of the bodhisattvas' as understood in the Mahayana.

The only buddhist Hearer vehicle existing at present is the Theravada and the Thervadins actually have the same outside appearance like the Mahayanists: monks living together, lay practitioners living in households, temples, teachers, coming together to listen to a teacher, lay practitioners practicing together and practicing alone at home.

 :anjali:
།བྷྲཱུཾ་བི་ཤྭ་བི་ཤུད་དྷེ།

Offline MarasAndBuddhas

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Re: Are all buddhist sects Mahayana?
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2019, 06:05:19 am »
Quote
I don't know where you've got the idea from that Theravada temples or monasteries don't give any help or teachings to lay people either, because they certainly do in my country.

Pixie, i didn't say this, in my country they definitely give help to other people, they wouldn't be able to exist very long if they didn't.

Quote

Generally the term 'hinayana' should be avoided because it is a derogative term often used  by Mahayana sectarians to disparage the vehicle of the Hearers (= Sravakas)' which is so called to differentiate it from the 'vehicle of the bodhisattvas' as understood in the Mahayana.

Hey stevie, this is in line with what i was looking for. I deduced that "hinayana" was a total disparagement, but what is a "hearer"?

I am also wondering what makes mahayana a distinct tradition, it seems like they just draw on more texts than the theravadas.

Offline stevie

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Re: Are all buddhist sects Mahayana?
« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2019, 08:04:43 am »
Quote

Generally the term 'hinayana' should be avoided because it is a derogative term often used  by Mahayana sectarians to disparage the vehicle of the Hearers (= Sravakas)' which is so called to differentiate it from the 'vehicle of the bodhisattvas' as understood in the Mahayana.

Hey stevie, this is in line with what i was looking for. I deduced that "hinayana" was a total disparagement, but what is a "hearer"?

I am also wondering what makes mahayana a distinct tradition, it seems like they just draw on more texts than the theravadas.

Dear IgnoringTheAversion,

you shouldn't interpret too much into labels, 'hearer' is merely a convention used in some of the English texts of the Tibetan Mahayana tradition I am currently reading. Of course taking the label at face value Mahayanists are also hearers since they are listening to their teachers, too.

The basic difference between Theravada and Mahayana is the 'official' goal of the path according to the doctrine of the tradition:
- Theravadins are striving for the nirvana of an Arhat
- Mahayanists are striving for the enlightenment of a Buddha

 :dharma:
།བྷྲཱུཾ་བི་ཤྭ་བི་ཤུད་དྷེ།

Offline Chaz

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Re: Are all buddhist sects Mahayana?
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2019, 02:23:14 pm »
So, after studying this stuff a little after the past 6 months, i found out at one point that there is no "hinayana" buddhist temple because that just means practicing without the help of anyone else. Does this imply that every buddhist set sits under the "Mahayana" umbrella, or does mahayana have it's own rule set for monks distinct from all the others?


There is no such thing as "Hinayana" in Buddhism.


Actually, "hinayana" is a thing in Buddhism.  It's pretty much a part of Mahayana teachings and represent a "yana" or vehicle that focuses on individual liberation with the 4NT and The N8FP as it's basis.  Mahayana builds on that, adding the Buddha's 2nd and 3rd turnings of the Wheel of Dharma.  Then there is Vajrayana will builds from there with practices for Buddhahood.

The sangha as Refuge is a major component here.  You do not practice alone.  In fact, Refuge in the Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha, is the beginning the Buddhist path through the Yanas.

I use the term hinayana with my fellow Mahayanists, but with Thervadins I tend to simply not bring it up.  I would refer to it as 1st Turning, but Theravadins tend to not recognise such terminology.

Technically, you can be a Theravadin and still practice Mahayana, take Bodhisattva Vows and so on.  Not at all incompatible, although there are those who might disagree.




 


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