Author Topic: Buddha Heart, Buddha Mind By HHDL  (Read 2031 times)

Offline sdjeff1

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Buddha Heart, Buddha Mind By HHDL
« on: November 12, 2012, 12:34:37 pm »
I've been reading Buddha Heart, Buddha Mind by HHDL.

I'm stuck on something and I think it's pretty basic. For those who've read it, on pp. 44-45 for example he discusses various levels of consciousness and then goes abruptly into this concept of a "clear light". That's where I get lost. I've read on a little and I'm totally lost.

For anyone whose read this book or has an understanding of this concept, I would appreciate any input.

Since I mostly study Theravada, This is all new but I want to educate myself a bit on the teachings of other traditions. I figured this was a good book to start with, I've always enjoyed his lectures. I'm then moving into a rather large book explaining all of the schools.
It's easier to push the cart rather than thinking of pushing the cart.
-anonymous monk

To be normal is the ideal aim of the unsuccessful.
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GoGet

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Re: Buddha Heart, Buddha Mind By HHDL
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2012, 12:45:22 pm »
I've been reading Buddha Heart, Buddha Mind by HHDL.

I'm stuck on something and I think it's pretty basic. For those who've read it, on pp. 44-45 for example he discusses various levels of consciousness and then goes abruptly into this concept of a "clear light". That's where I get lost. I've read on a little and I'm totally lost.

For anyone whose read this book or has an understanding of this concept, I would appreciate any input.

Since I mostly study Theravada, This is all new but I want to educate myself a bit on the teachings of other traditions. I figured this was a good book to start with, I've always enjoyed his lectures. I'm then moving into a rather large book explaining all of the schools.


"Clear Light" is a commonly used term in Tibetan Buddhism.  The Tibetan word is "Ösel".

The term, Clear Light, is often used in reference to mind. It is interchangeable with the luminosity.  His Holiness sees this as the most subtle level of mind - mind fee of obscurations.  Ven Ajahn Chah calls it "Original Mind" - mind that is fully peaceful and unmoving.

Check this out:

http://viewonbuddhism.org/mind.html

Offline Lobster

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Re: Buddha Heart, Buddha Mind By HHDL
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2012, 10:26:10 pm »
You can think of it as
clear (without doubt and obscurations)
and light in weight (having no attachments to impede movement)

The description is one based on a vision based metaphor.
It is 'your face before you were born', Buddha Nature, the far shore and so on. :dharma:

Offline francis

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Re: Buddha Heart, Buddha Mind By HHDL
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2012, 02:15:20 am »
Pabhassara Sutta: Luminous AN 1.49-52. Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu
"Enlightenment, for a wave in the ocean, is the moment the wave realises it is water." - Thich Nhat Hanh

Offline francis

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Re: Buddha Heart, Buddha Mind By HHDL
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2012, 01:17:52 pm »
On reflection, I thought I would quote the whole sutta and suggest following the link to read the notes on the sutta.

Pabhassara Sutta: Luminous AN 1.49-52. Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu


"Luminous, monks, is the mind.[1] And it is defiled by incoming defilements." {I,v,9}

"Luminous, monks, is the mind. And it is freed from incoming defilements." {I,v,10}

"Luminous, monks, is the mind. And it is defiled by incoming defilements. The uninstructed run-of-the-mill person doesn't discern that as it actually is present, which is why I tell you that — for the uninstructed run-of-the-mill person — there is no development of the mind." {I,vi,1}

"Luminous, monks, is the mind. And it is freed from incoming defilements. The well-instructed disciple of the noble ones discerns that as it actually is present, which is why I tell you that — for the well-instructed disciple of the noble ones — there is development of the mind." {I,vi,2}

"Enlightenment, for a wave in the ocean, is the moment the wave realises it is water." - Thich Nhat Hanh

Offline santamonicacj

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Re: Buddha Heart, Buddha Mind By HHDL
« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2012, 07:38:52 pm »
Quote
I'm then moving into a rather large book explaining all of the schools.
Since you're obviously a bright guy and are motivated enough to put in some effort, I'd like to recommend "Indestructible Truth" by Dr. Reginald Ray. Ray was the head meditation instructor for Trungpa's group and a PhD. also. He wrote it as a college textbook for an intro to Buddhism. It is oriented towards Tibetan style, but has a solid presentation of Indian Buddhism as a background. It doesn't include Chinese or Japanese schools.

I have a patchwork education in Buddhism. I know a lot about some narrow subject and almost nothing about many others. The things I know a lot about he gets perfectly, so I feel confident he knows the subjects I'm weak in perfectly as well. Plus he's a good writer and it doesn't read like a textbook. Being a practitioner adds depth to it.
Warning: I'm enough of a fundamentalist Tibet style Buddhist to believe that for the last 1,000 years Tibet has produced a handful of enlightened masters in every generation. I do not ask that YOU believe it, but it will greatly simplify conversations if you understand that about me. Thanks.

Offline riju

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Re: Buddha Heart, Buddha Mind By HHDL
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2012, 10:44:15 pm »
I have not read the book.

But in my meditation i reach the state occasionally where my mind
appeares clear and sometimes lunminious.
Luminious mind get cleared by awareness.
At the start  of everyday meditation mind is defiled and hence dark.

However clear or luminious mind state is,
sleep darkens the mind. After sleep every time I have to meditate in
awareness to bring the  mind to clear / luminious state.

Sometimes after getting up from sleep, mind is very dark, whole body is also in
many pains. Even if I sit for two hours or more , the mind does not reach the clear/
luminious state. I have to  leave at that stage to take up the meditation later.

I consider this process as a process of walking the path of bhoddisattva. May be I
am right/ wrong.

Defilement of my mind occurs not only in  sleep but in actual life dealing with people.
But comparably sleep defilement is more.

When I get up after clear/luminious mind, body is free from pains and I feel light.
Day passes off quietly.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2012, 10:45:49 pm by riju »

Offline sdjeff1

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Re: Buddha Heart, Buddha Mind By HHDL
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2012, 10:42:59 am »
Thanks, all.

I've been reading over all of that material GoGet provided. (and the book, of course) Very helpful. That was also helpful, francis. Lobster, I get it. Now, anyway. I really didn't understand your explanation before, no offense.

SMCJ,

Sounds like a good one. I looked it up. It's on my wish list.

My sister is letting me dig through the garage and retrieve her 20 some odd Buddhist books. I've decided that I'm getting through those along with the bazillion ebooks I have before I get or download another one. Ought to keep me busy a year or two.
It's easier to push the cart rather than thinking of pushing the cart.
-anonymous monk

To be normal is the ideal aim of the unsuccessful.
-CG Jung

Offline Feathers

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Re: Buddha Heart, Buddha Mind By HHDL
« Reply #8 on: December 27, 2012, 07:40:58 am »
What's the big book you have that discusses all traditions? And have you found it to be any good?

Offline sdjeff1

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Re: Buddha Heart, Buddha Mind By HHDL
« Reply #9 on: December 27, 2012, 02:45:16 pm »
What's the big book you have that discusses all traditions? And have you found it to be any good?
It's called The Buddhist Handbook. Turns out it discusses most of the traditions, not all. It's still a good overview. It'll be awhile before I get to it, I've decided to read more into another subject for now.
It's easier to push the cart rather than thinking of pushing the cart.
-anonymous monk

To be normal is the ideal aim of the unsuccessful.
-CG Jung

 


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