Author Topic: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014  (Read 5422 times)

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #120 on: June 21, 2014, 08:40:04 am »
Being Detached

From the perspective of the secular world, to be a detached person doesn’t seem quite proper. An adage says: “Respect those who care about you, even if they are not your relatives; dissociate from those who forsake you, even if they are your friends.” However, for a seeker who feels disillusionment with samsara, it is advisable to stay away from corrupting influences, even if it may seem inconsiderate to others’ feelings.

Phuchungwa (1031–1109) studied with Dromtonpa for 11 years, he was one of the three great geshes of Kadampa and the founder of its pith lineage. He once taught: “The scales on a shield, once they fall off, cannot be pasted back on to where they were. Likewise, by practicing genuine Dharma assiduously, you can cast off completely your ties with greedy worldly people. You come to detest any act that caters to others’ wants, and you can no longer live in agreement with those controlled by negative forces. Do not be bothered by their displeasure or complaints of you. That’s their business. Decide that you’ll never yield just to please others no matter how severely they slander or criticize you. Practice the Dharma consistently with grace and ease, even when sustenance is running out save for a few mouthfuls of food. When your positive qualities become dominant, you will benefit others spontaneously.” There is no need, therefore, to submit always to others’ whims and be a yes-man. Stick to your principles. Trying to spare others’ feelings for short term minor issues will obstruct your ultimate pursuit on the Dharma path. Does it pay to be “pennywise but pound foolish?”

All the things people pursue so tirelessly—relationships, friendship, wealth, and fame—are in essence nothing but phantoms of suffering. Tsangpa Gyare says: “The root of greed and anger is your homeland; the root of suffering is your family; the root of avarice is money; the root of distraction is emotional attachment. Therefore, renounce all of them.” Khetsun Bartsen once lamented the faults of keeping subjects: “Your attendants and cooks all distract you from true Dharma. Sever your associations with worldly folks. Make no more acquaintances in this life; let the wall of fastidiousness to affection fall.” Pawo expressed the same sentiment: “The more famous you become, the more trouble you have; serving the chief and managing subordinates involve numerous activities; you have to distribute allowance and attention without bias to all your subjects, otherwise their coming and going will pester you to no end; having it all will not bring you happiness. Therefore, seek a place of solitude with genuine renunciation.”

As you are becoming a “detached person,” your friends and relatives may be baffled. Even so, this will only do them good; no harm will come to them whatsoever.

1st of April, Year of RenWu
May 13, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #121 on: June 22, 2014, 08:12:45 am »
Hidden Treasures

At the mention of the hidden treasures, “terma,” most Buddhists immediately assume that it is something special for the Nyingma lineage of Tibetan Buddhism. But to hold such a viewpoint is a sign of being ill informed.

In one scripture of the Sutrayana, The Sutra of Abiding in Samadhi, Buddha says: “As I pass into nirvana, my body relic and the Dharma will remain in the world. Buddhas and Bodhisattvas, having meditated on the Doctrines, will codify and store them in treasure chests, conceal them inside stupas, under the earth, or in the rocks; they then bid gods, nagas, and demigods as the protectors. Just like the divine realm’s pure precepts, these Dharma treasures cannot ever be destroyed. In the future at the destined time, great masters of different lineages, cued by the Buddhas and Bodhisattvas, will reveal the treasures, decipher them, and bring benefits to all sentient beings.” In The Sutra of Practicing the Authentic Dharma it also says: “Ananda, those who codify Dharma teachings and conceal them so that fresh, unimpaired Dharma will long remain in this world are making great offerings. They will be endowed with four huge fortunes. What are these four? They are: to attain Buddha’s divine eye and.” etc. Obviously, the Buddha from early on has described clearly the origin of the hidden treasures. Our misunderstanding comes from not having read enough scriptures.

Regardless, the benefits of hidden treasures in this degenerate time are unfathomable. One of the great revealers of the hidden treasure, Terton Padma Langpa, says: “Terma—the profound, complete, faultless, and immense treasure—will guide numerous beings in degenerate times. Liberation may be achieved even by practicing some of it. Whosoever with karmic connections, therefore, awaken your Buddha nature and devote yourself to terma practice, spurred on always by the thought of impermanence. You can be sure to attain liberation in this very life. Whoever has faith in terma during a degenerate time must have met the Great Master of Oddiyana, Guru Rinpoche, previously and pledged in front of him. Rejoice, all of you virtuous beings destined to this practice!”

If you want to know more about the hidden treasures, such as their quality, principle, debate on logic reasoning, and so forth, I would recommend to you check the detailed description in The Comprehensive History of Terma by Padma Langpa.

2nd of April, Year of RenWu
May 14, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #122 on: June 23, 2014, 12:45:40 pm »
Colorful Balloons

Up in the clear blue sky, there often float colorful balloons of various shapes and sizes. Some are tiny and soft that a newborn baby can play with, while others are as large as a house that a few husky fellows could fit into. Some balloons are up there to celebrate festivals or holidays, while others are for commercial promotions with slogans. Regardless of their ever-changing varieties, a wise man knows what is really inside them: nothing but empty space. The balloons will pop once they meet up with unfavorable conditions.

In this world, the Buddhas and Bodhisattvas use many expedient ways to benefit sentient beings. Other than those, any manifestation of an ordinary person’s fortune—being very famous, having tons of money, and being surrounded by loved ones and attendants—is no different than the balloon. When you hold a high position, people flock around; when you are hit by hard times, fair-weather friends disappear. A Chinese proverb goes: “When the tree falls, the monkeys scatter.” And again: “When in power, a cat could be mightier than a tiger; when down and out, a phoenix could be plainer than a crow.” Prestige and wealth are insubstantial and ephemeral. Geshe Khapa said: “Fame is the lure set up by the demon; wealth is the rope that binds you; good fortune works against your virtue. All these are poisons; do not take them as medicines.”

According to the descriptions in The Great Biography of Buddha Shakyamuni, some practitioners would curse each other by saying: “May good fortune befall unto him” or “May he become a king.” Thus, a person with so-called good fortune is actually bearing obstacles to liberation instead.

Dampa Gangkhar, one of the foremost disciples of Dampa Sangye, once entreated his teacher for five accomplishments: “May I own no home to go back to; may I be impoverished as to have no food or drink; may I be a recluse cared for by no friends or relatives; may I be so secluded that no one could find me; may I enjoy no worldly fortune even if it were as tiny as one sesame grain.” After making these aspirations, he set off to a lonely hermitage to practice vigilantly and finally attained incomparable accomplishment.

In The Sutra Requested by Purna it says: “Strive not for amassing possessions; abandon them even if they come to you. From now on seek only the profound Dharma and keep pure precepts.” A truly wise man should abandon fame and money like so much spit in the dust and regard the Dharma and pure precepts as supreme. If a practitioner ended up having nothing left but worldly wealth and fame, then he is without substance, like a balloon. One saying goes: “Wealth and high position are but a fool’s dreams; stunning beauty turns into a heap of bones.” All appearances of the world are as illusory as flowers in the mirror or the moon reflected in water; they are only the causes for endless cyclic existence.

3rd of April, Year of RenWu
May 15, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #123 on: June 23, 2014, 12:46:53 pm »
New post will stop next month.  :namaste:

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #124 on: June 24, 2014, 01:03:17 pm »
Golden Advice

In order to request an audience with H.H. Jigme Phuntsok Rinpoche, Khenpo Gendun from Hongyuan made a special trip covering hundreds of miles to Chengdu, in spite of his old age and frail health. When I heard this, I quickly went to visit him at the Agricultural Machinery Guest House.

Room 407, where he’s staying, is a shabby and humble double room, sparsely furnished with only two antiquated wooden beds and a wobbly wooden table that seems about to fall apart. Yet Khenpo’s beaming face broadcasts his ease as if he were in the realm of God. Although he is over 70 years old and has difficulty walking, he is still hale and hearty with his glowing ruddy cheeks exuding energy.

It was at the Larung Gar Five Sciences Buddhist Academy that I received teachings from him on 13 major commentaries such as the Buddha Nature: The Mahayana Uttaratantra Shastra and The Adornment of the Middle Way (Madhyamakalankara), etc. How much I owe him for his kindness and tutelage! I will never forget the image of his diminutive figure holding the long, narrow texts.

When Khenpo was young, his thirst for Dharma drove him to many places to receive teachings from great masters, and he has become well versed in the scriptures and commentaries in sutras and tantras. But he never thought he had learned enough and always continued to study. At Larung Gar, he lived not far from my wooden cottage. When I happened to wake up at two or three in the morning, there was already a dim light coming from his residence. At times I would sneak up to take a look, and I could see him diligently concentrating on reading and studying. I remember one year when our beloved Guru Jigme Phuntsok Rinpoche came back from Xinnong, the whole academy was filled with excited well-wishers and bustling activities. Still all the hustle and bustle did not distract him from immersing himself deeply in the ocean of scriptures, which made him even more remarkable and distinguished. His behavior made a strong impression on me. For a long time, I took him as a role model and would not give in to laziness.

On this day, we have a heart-to-heart talk for a quite a while. He looks at me with such tender and loving eyes that I feel a surge of warmth swelling up in me. He says he is now faking sickness and shutting his eyes to all outside affairs. Leading a quiet life at his place, he devotes himself wholly to mantra recitation. His attendant tells me that since finishing a teaching on Nyingma tradition at the Beijing Buddhist College last year up until a few days ago, his master has been in a completely silent retreat, with this sign posted on the door: “I am seriously ill. No visitors please.” They are going back to the mountain hermitage tomorrow and will start the retreat again the day after arriving. I don’t know what he is practicing, but my guess is the supreme Great Perfection.

How marvelous and desirable is his current situation! For me now, I still cannot but subject myself to external factors. Deep in my heart I yearn to go to the places of solitude, even when I am living in the city; I yearn for total silence, though I have to talk a lot of nonsense; I yearn for unwavering awareness, though my mind always rushes here and there. I wonder if all these wishes can be realized in my later years, that I could settle down and practice just like him.

We really should emulate him—to study a great deal when we have the energy, and to practice thoroughly once the Dharma has penetrated the heart. If we keep following the discursive thoughts of superficial virtue, when can we rest in the nature of the mind?

4th of April, Year of RenWu
May 16, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #125 on: June 25, 2014, 04:45:59 am »
Love Arrow

A Tibetan proverb goes like this: “An arrow lodged in the earth is easy to pull out, while a love arrow hit in the heart is by no means easy to remove.”

Love and lust are sharp arrows that bring suffering. The Buddha says in Dhammapada: “The arrow you create may return to hurt you yourself. The same is true for the arrow in your heart. Love arrows bring suffering to beings.”

No wonder Westerners also use the metaphor of “Cupid’s Arrow” to describe love. Love, although glorified and embraced by many poignant writings, poems, and lyrics, is nonetheless an arrow: Its nature is to harm. In The Story of the Buddha it says: “From love comes worry, from love comes fear. Disengaging from love frees you from worry, disengaging from love frees you from fear.” Love and lust are the causes of pain and suffering. If we were not weighed down by strong emotions of love, we would not have taken rebirths in samsara again and again. Separation from loved ones is indeed an unbearable sorrow. But even lovers who never separate for a single day are not immune to tremendous anguish over mutual attachment. Like a gorgeous sunset, beauty fades in no time; like a running brook, music is gone in a snap of the fingers; like the morning dew, worldly love evaporates in a blink. To fall in love intensely without knowing how to extricate oneself will only add layer upon layer of troubles and worries.”

How can we be free from it all? The answer can be found in a story told by the Buddha: A king was offered an elephant tamed meticulously by an elephant specialist. One day during an excursion with the king in the forest, this elephant suddenly became crazed when he sniffed the scent of a female elephant. It could not help but run wildly, to the horrific alarm of the king who subsequently admonished the trainer. This was the trainer’s reply: “When lust flares up, no lasso nor iron hook will work. As a trainer, I can only tame the elephant’s body, but not its mind.” “Then who can tame such beings’ body and mind?” “Only the Buddha can! ”

Indeed, relying on the Buddha is the only way to save us from drowning in the torrents of love or from being entangled in secular relationships. To fall into the great river of love and lust is to drift around in samsara. The Surangama Sutra says: “Until the river of lust and love is dried up, there is no liberation.” For us to run away from the flood of lust, to dodge the love arrow and to be relieved from sorrow and fear, the only recourse is to practice the Buddha’s teachings.

A poem written by Su Shih says: “To pacify the pounding waves of the suffering ocean, first let its feeding water of love and lust run dry.” To be rescued from the ocean of samsaric suffering, sentient beings must first cut their Gordian knot of all consuming love.

In the long journey of life, how many people have been inflicted with the painful arrow of love?

5th of April, Year of RenWu
May 17, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #126 on: June 26, 2014, 01:40:18 pm »
Disturb Not

“As time passes, old age creeps up on us. What remains unchanging is only the bright sunshine.” Time flies as swiftly as a flash of lightning; once gone, it can never be recovered. From the first day of obtaining this precious body to the last day of surrendering it, we have merely scores of years, and they rush away in a wink. One proverb says: “An exquisite jade, even a foot in diameter, is nothing to be treasured. Only our time is most precious; every second of it is to be cherished dearly.” For spiritual practitioners, it is all the more important to recognize the great value of time.

In one of his previous lives, Buddha Shakyamuni was reborn as a Brahmin who studiously practiced in solitude. The god Indra, deeply impressed, appeared in person intending to bestow accomplishment upon the future Buddha. The Brahmin said: “I really don’t have a lot of wishes. But should you grant me one, let it be the siddhi that you will no longer visit me, lest I be distracted by trying to receive you.” It is clear, then, that the best thing you can do for an authentic Dharma practitioner is to refrain from disturbing him.

A practitioner once told me that visitors or phone calls bother him most, as these would take up a good chunk of his time.

One Khenpo at the academy also says: “If a visitor comes to my house to handle some affairs, chances are he’ll stay and chatter on and on. To avoid such a situation, I would rather walk a long way to their place instead; that way I can depart as soon as things get done. Time won’t be wasted.”

That is so true. Those who care less or are insensitive to time deem talking or gossiping an enjoyment. Yet one who is keenly aware of the impermanence of life and the preciousness of human existence will rather give up wealth than waste time.

Master Nagongpa says: “Instead of discussing ambiguous or grandiose opinions, it would be better to read with respect the life stories of the Buddhas and Bodhisattvas, to learn how they advance from initial aspiration to ultimate accomplishment. This is one skillful way of learning that will never fail you!”

Lu Xun, the famous writer, says in his Essays of an Outsider (Main Wai Wen Tan): “Time is life. If you senselessly waste another’s time, how different is that from taking his life or stealing his money?” Therefore, even if you yourself are not engaging in Dharma practice, never plot against a practitioner’s life wealth!

6th April, Year of RenWu
May 18, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #127 on: June 27, 2014, 01:07:04 pm »
Dance Performance

On the stage of human life, everyone is a dancer. Some dance performances can be thrillingly spectacular, gripping everyone’s attention; while others are just jejune, flat, and dull. If asked to name the most elegant and graceful dance, secular people and spiritual practitioners have different ideas, as the saying goes: “The benevolent see benevolence and the wise see wisdom”.

The Palestinian leader Arafat dominated the international stage during his time; he established his government and once audaciously pledged for peace at the United Nations by holding a machine gun in one hand and an olive branch in the other. Although public opinions on his conduct vary widely, he was once a big name on the world scene.

Now, at the age of 72 and living under house arrest in a war-torn, run-down hut, he still does not waste any time. For the past 10 years he has adhered strictly to four hours’ rest per day, going to bed late and getting up early, to devote all his waking hours to fight for his “peace movement,” even to the point of neglecting to shave in order to save a few minutes. He said: “Fifteen minutes per day spent on shaving consumes seven whole hours a month!” Putting aside the issue of whether his effort is worthwhile or if his view is correct, it is worthwhile for us to take note of his vigilance on time.

What is life like for most people these days? During the day it is hurriedly and busily roving among people; at night, it is blearily drifting to sleep in bed; in the middle, it is killing time in endless idle gossip. What portion of the whole day, if any, is committed to spiritual practice? If every day we get up one hour earlier and go to bed one hour later, we will manage to save 60 hours in merely a month. A dancer, wishing to perfect elegant dancing poses, would not hesitate to study persistently and practice painstakingly. A seeker for spiritual liberation, then, should all the more know how to value time; otherwise, it doesn’t make sense.

When you decide to be a spiritual practitioner, consider seriously what kind of role you want to play—do not choose the one that is beautiful outside but hollow within. Rendawa says: “Nothing pleases the Buddhas and Bodhisattvas more than your Dharma practice, that is, to listen to and contemplate the Dharma and to meditate diligently in order to cut off attachment to this life.”

Shen, Dan, Jing, Mo, Chou*, the five characters (in traditional Chinese opera) are said to include all different types of characters in the ordinary world. But these five types are also applicable to the varieties of practitioners. Some practitioners who only assume perfunctory virtuous acts but do not cultivate internal qualities could be called “chou”—jesters, the laughingstock. But it could be worse. A jester in a play can at least bring laughter to the audience; the jesters among practitioners, however, bring no benefit but ruin to themselves and others.

How to perform your part as a spiritual practitioner—to play to the audience with hundreds of fancy movements and postures, or to be guileless but solid in practice and realization? Shouldn’t we ponder these issues deeply?

7th April, Year of RenWu
May 19, 2002

Translator’s note:
*Characters in In Chinese Opera:
Shen – a young male lead,
Dan – the female leads,
Jing – a fierce or supporting male lead,
Mo – an older male supporting lead
Chou – the jester.

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #128 on: June 28, 2014, 01:19:20 pm »
Joyful Always

Suffering can be naturally transformed when one’s practice reaches a certain level. The secret to remaining joyful when encountering any obstacle or misfortune is to relax the mind. Tsangpa Gyare says: “A mind steeped in grasping can never be free from avarice, hatred, and pain; learning to let the mind go of clinging and relax, happiness will never depart from you.”

There was a great yogi in Tibet, Chekhawa Yeshe Dorje, who mastered sutras and tantras and possessed genuine bodhichitta. Over the course of his life of 75 years, he founded Chekha Monastery and took 900 disciples under his care. He gave this instruction to his followers: “Maintain always a joyful spirit and guard your mind at every moment. To grasp oneself as truly existing is the cause of all troubles; instead, think always to repay the kindness of all sentient beings. These are the supreme pith instructions to practice.” As practitioners, we should remain peaceful at any minute and look into the nature of the mind in all of our activities of sitting, standing, sleeping, or moving about. When difficulty and suffering arise, do not put the blame on fate or others. Dispel self-cherishing and practice the Four Immeasurable Qualities. Even when we have nightmares, we should practice the view on emptiness rather than trying hard to get rid of them. Thus, we remain unattached in all circumstances.

Geshe Khapa said: “Unless one knows what to adopt and what to abandon, no activity will bring happiness; for the wise who have established the proper conduct of adoption and rejection, adverse conditions can be transformed into beneficial ones.” Therefore, the way to happiness is to have a correct view and to be mindful, as well as to be clear in renouncing evil and taking up good. Otherwise, all activities will be futile; not only will they fail to bring any happiness but also they will instead pile up more suffering.

Geshe Langri Tangpa says:

Just live a simple and humble life in a solitary place, give up amassing possessions meaninglessly.
Just devote yourself to virtue day and night, give up the futile search for relationships.
Just stay put in your room and tame your own mind, give up following people aimlessly.
Just please your teacher by practicing the Dharma as an offering, give up chasing hollow fame and fortune.
Just protect others by offering assistance, give up reciting useless wrathful mantras.

A restless mind is exhausting while contentment brings happiness. When a person’s mind is imbued with positive attitude, a brilliant surge of light will be shining forth from within. Wherever one goes about in life, there will always be showers of happiness and a sense of ease following behind.

8th of April, Year of RenWu
May 20, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #129 on: June 29, 2014, 03:15:20 pm »
Essential Points

The Three Supreme Methods, the very pith instruction to enhance the source of merit, is taught emphatically by all the great masters. Its importance has always been extensively exhorted, whether at general teachings addressing a large group or at a one-to-one transmission.

Patrul Rinpoche has repeatedly admonished his disciples: “Whenever you do something positive, no matter how great or small, it is important to enhance it with the Three Supreme Methods. In the beginning, arouse bodhichitta as a skillful means to make sure that the action becomes a source of good for the future. While carrying out the action, avoid getting involved in any conceptualization, so that the merit cannot be destroyed by circumstances. At the end, seal the action properly by dedicating the merit, which ensures that it continually grows ever greater.”

The Omniscient Dharma King Longchenpa in The Precious Treasury of Pith Instructions also left this teaching: “Beginning with the motivation of bodhichitta, you go beyond the Basic Vehicle; practicing without attachment, you realize the nature of emptiness; concluding by dedicating the merit free from three concepts, you transform all activities onto the path.” And in A Treatise on Finding Comfort and Ease in the Nature of Mind in Great Perfection he says: “Always perform any meritorious act by arousing bodhichitta in the beginning, staying in non-conceptual wisdom while doing it, and at the end, dedicating the dreamlike merit. Understand that any positive action done with the Three Supreme Methods is called the virtue that leads to liberation and is the cause for complete enlightenment. On the other hand, any positive action done without the Three Supreme Methods is called the virtue that leads to temporary happiness. Its merit will be exhausted after bearing fruit only once.”

Therefore, if our goal is to attain perfect Buddhahood, all our positive actions—reciting mantras, making offerings, reading books, liberating live beings, prostration, and any other seemingly insignificant ones—should always be accompanied by the Three Supreme Methods. Like a drop of water falling into the ocean, merit that is dedicated to enlightenment will never dry up until its goal is reached. In the Middle Prajnaparamita Sutra the Buddha says: “Sariputra, dedicate the merit solely toward total enlightenment, do not dedicate it to anything less, such as attaining the level of Sravaka, Prakyabuddha, or others.”

Although I always preach these instructions, I myself have failed many times to execute them in my own conduct. How embarrassing! Lama chen!

9th of April, Year of RenWu
May 21, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #130 on: June 30, 2014, 01:06:19 pm »
Be Vigilant

In Vajrayana practice, it is of utmost importance to respect and have faith in our masters.

H.H. the 8th Karmapa, a great leader in Tibet’s religious government and an accomplished master of the Great Perfection, says: “No matter what kind of teacher you may have, do not find fault with him even if you lack faith, and especially do not criticize his fault. If someone is talking about such things, it’s best to avoid listening. If you happen to hear it, do not take it as true. Even if it were true, you should regard it as having secret meaning; rejoice in all your teacher’s activities and strengthen your faith.” And again: “Examine your own mind all the time. Until compassion has arisen in you and you have established a view on emptiness, you may temporarily forgo your teacher’s instructions should they involve performing harmful or negative activities. You do not violate his teaching at this stage. To say that relying only on one master is sufficient and that there is no need for other teachers is incorrect; it is a mark of having been contaminated by negative forces. In past history, it is evident that great masters have relied on more than just one teacher. By making multitudes of offerings, servicing the teachers, and accumulating merit, they attained accomplishment. There are numerous examples like this.”

Sakya Pandita says: “Any instruction that is not in accordance with the Buddha’s teaching, even if it comes from your teacher, can be ignored.” A similar passage can be found in the Explanation on the 50 Rules to Serve the Teacher by Master Tsongkhapa.

Nevertheless, we should remind ourselves that we could never fathom a teacher’s realization. Only after thorough examination can we establish if his particular activity is harmful or beneficial to sentient beings. By all means, never leave your teacher too hastily, because the teacher, as the support of all our activities, carries grave weight. The repercussion of abandoning a master is the inevitable rebirth to the most horrific vajra hells. It’s best to exercise vigilance!

11th of April, Year of RenWu
May 22, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #131 on: July 02, 2014, 12:33:48 pm »
 :headbow:
We'll stop post now.
The short articles are from the <Footprints on the Journey> by khenpo Sodargye.
You may continue the reading on the website:http://www.khenposodargye.org/2013/03/footprints-on-the-journey-table-of-contents/

Thank you for all the support!
Wish everyone the best! :pray:

Yours,
UK Bodhi Association

 


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