Author Topic: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014  (Read 5424 times)

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #15 on: March 30, 2014, 02:11:04 pm »
Wisdom and Compassion

To speak impressively does not make one an authentic spiritual practitioner. What really counts is to genuinely turn the mind toward the Dharma while casting away the mundane world.

The great Zen master Damei, after realizing the nature of the mind as pointed out by his teacher Mazu Daoyi, retreated to Mountain Siming in Zhejiang. Years later, Qi An, a salt trading officer and once his friend, learned of his whereabouts and sent emissaries to cordially invite him out. The Zen master declined the offer with these two verses:

To a ruined dead tree in chilly forest,
Many seasons of spring have brought no revival.
Even passing woodcutters heed it not,
Why do you, the man of Ying County, still pursue me so hard?

By describing himself as a useless dead tree, he declined the offer politely. And:

Clothing is plenty from the lotus leaves in the pond,
Food is abundant among pine berries and flowers.
My hideout will be moved deeper into the woods,
As the old one has just been exposed to visitors.

These verses clearly show that he has firmly denounced the secular world; let there be spring flowers or the autumn moon, his heart will not be enticed into blossoming or sprouting. All his seven earthly emotions and the six sensory pleasures have been thoroughly cleansed away. He is content with wearing lotus leaves and eating pine berries. This imposing manner of his—transcending the three realms, free from the five aggregates, and unshakable by mundane affairs—is truly the conduct of a great practitioner. I feel deeply humbled when reflecting upon it.

Khenpo Choja of Sertha Huoxi was exactly like this. Following his teacher’s footsteps, he went to Shiqu for Dharma teachings. Just like the great Kadampa masters, all his life he denounced fame, wealth, profit, and power; his dwelling in Huoxi for decades was a shabby room made from wood planks. Although his life was extremely difficult, he was worry-free and carefree; he practiced persistently until his final days. Once he said: “With wisdom, a genuine practitioner clings to nothing and his compassion for sentient beings arises effortlessly. Having wisdom and compassion, all the essence in the sutra and tantra is within reach. Missing them, he will easily revert to scheming for personal gain, even if a few days earlier he has just given big talks on altruism and doing a retreat.” Longchenpa the Omniscient also says: “Your training should bring a change in you as noticeable as if you had worn your clothes the wrong way.” Therefore, without wisdom and compassion, no amount of talk means anything. Bear this in mind!

Early morning, 12thof January, Year of RenWu
February 24, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #16 on: April 02, 2014, 02:12:55 pm »
Wisdom and Compassion

To speak impressively does not make one an authentic spiritual practitioner. What really counts is to genuinely turn the mind toward the Dharma while casting away the mundane world.

The great Zen master Damei, after realizing the nature of the mind as pointed out by his teacher Mazu Daoyi, retreated to Mountain Siming in Zhejiang. Years later, Qi An, a salt trading officer and once his friend, learned of his whereabouts and sent emissaries to cordially invite him out. The Zen master declined the offer with these two verses:

To a ruined dead tree in chilly forest,
Many seasons of spring have brought no revival.
Even passing woodcutters heed it not,
Why do you, the man of Ying County, still pursue me so hard?

By describing himself as a useless dead tree, he declined the offer politely. And:

Clothing is plenty from the lotus leaves in the pond,
Food is abundant among pine berries and flowers.
My hideout will be moved deeper into the woods,
As the old one has just been exposed to visitors.

These verses clearly show that he has firmly denounced the secular world; let there be spring flowers or the autumn moon, his heart will not be enticed into blossoming or sprouting. All his seven earthly emotions and the six sensory pleasures have been thoroughly cleansed away. He is content with wearing lotus leaves and eating pine berries. This imposing manner of his—transcending the three realms, free from the five aggregates, and unshakable by mundane affairs—is truly the conduct of a great practitioner. I feel deeply humbled when reflecting upon it.

Khenpo Choja of Sertha Huoxi was exactly like this. Following his teacher’s footsteps, he went to Shiqu for Dharma teachings. Just like the great Kadampa masters, all his life he denounced fame, wealth, profit, and power; his dwelling in Huoxi for decades was a shabby room made from wood planks. Although his life was extremely difficult, he was worry-free and carefree; he practiced persistently until his final days. Once he said: “With wisdom, a genuine practitioner clings to nothing and his compassion for sentient beings arises effortlessly. Having wisdom and compassion, all the essence in the sutra and tantra is within reach. Missing them, he will easily revert to scheming for personal gain, even if a few days earlier he has just given big talks on altruism and doing a retreat.” Longchenpa the Omniscient also says: “Your training should bring a change in you as noticeable as if you had worn your clothes the wrong way.” Therefore, without wisdom and compassion, no amount of talk means anything. Bear this in mind!

Early morning, 12thof January, Year of RenWu
February 24, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #17 on: April 03, 2014, 03:17:37 pm »
Be Diligent

Delicate fragrance wafted from the jasmine tea; the sun, through the leaves of the tall arbor tree, beamed down warm shafts of light.

Sitting on the balcony in this refreshing scent and with the book A Treatise on Finding Comfort and Ease in the Nature of Mind in hand, somehow I found it hard to concentrate.

The neighboring Xiamen Middle School started its new term today. Students wearing smart uniforms poured onto the beautiful campus. Gone was the serenity of this place; my mind, which is easily distracted by surroundings, also started rushing around.

This middle school is well equipped with modern facilities. It has brand new buildings; big open sports fields, colorful gardens, as well as kind and capable teachers. Students conduct group physical exercises in harmonious unison, while during recess they play actively and cheerfully. Unknowingly, my mind drifted back to my beloved days at the Zong Ta Middle School.

Even though such nice facilities were nonexistent at that time and we wore only ragged clothes, we were happy all the same. Alas, things have changed! Three out of my seven roommates and dear friends from those days—Huaze, Zebi, and Danbi—have already passed away in succession. In my dreams, I often revisit those tender years, enjoying our blissful youth together. But upon waking up I have to face the reality that that enchanted time and place are all gone. I have no idea into which realms my friends were reborn. Regardless, how I wish they could have happiness and peacefulness. “Om Mani Padme Hum Hri!”

I am now a man of 40, even if I can live into my 60s, there are only 20 rounds of seasons left. “Our life comes with an expiration date; sadly the number of days is scarce.” The English playwright Shakespeare mentioned that time moves on with silent steps, it will not pause even for a moment just because you have many things to tend to. To a diligent person, the passage of time brings wisdom and strength; to the indolent, only regrets and aching void.

If it is not today, when is the time to be diligent?

13th of January, Year of RenWu
February 25, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #18 on: April 04, 2014, 03:22:08 pm »
No Craving

Gain and loss, pleasure and pain, fame and defamation, praise and blame, these eight worldly concerns are what ordinary people care about most. However, they are huge impediments for spiritual seekers whose job is to see them as essence-less as the banana tree and to give up on them. In A Guide to the Bodhisattva Way of Life it says:

When all things are devoid of true existence, what is there to gain, and what to lose? Who can be honored or humiliated by whom?
From where can pain and pleasure arise, what can be liked and what loathed? When examined as to its true nature, who is craving, what is there to crave?
Upon analysis of this world of living beings, who will die in it? Who will come to exist? Who has existed? And who, indeed, are relatives and friends?
May beings like myself realize that everything is just like space!

To attain a high level of realization, one must eliminate clinging to all external objects and realize the emptiness in self and all phenomena. It is only then one becomes firmly unshakable by the eight worldly winds.

Once, Dromtonpa’s followers at the Serdung Valley sought him out for teachings. He asked his disciple Jixiang Zizai (Auspicious Ease) to go instead: “I am now practicing on renouncing the secular world, should I head out, it would be a disservice to my practice.” Staying put, he wore nothing but tattered clothes covered with patches, often he took off the upper garment and threw it over his back, with two sleeves hanging over his shoulders. Sometimes he disappeared into the pinewoods, at other times he leaned against his rattan cane for breaks. Often he recited the verses in Letter to a Friend: “Gain and loss, pleasure and pain, fame and defamation, praise and blame, see them as the eight concerns of the secular world. To pacify your mind, abandon them all.” Sometimes he murmured to himself: “Being the one seeking liberation, I am not bound by fame, power, money, or gain.” He would finish the whole verse, but many times he entered meditative absorption when he was only halfway through or barely at the beginning.

His unique instruction to his disciples was: “Chase not after the eight worldly concerns in this brief human life.” His main disciple Chengawa took this teaching to heart and practiced most tenaciously, forbearing adversities and braving the elements. Finally Chengawa subdued the eight worldly concerns and reached the state of “no lightning thunderbolt can shock his concentration; no scorching flame can inflict his mind.”

15th of January, Year of RenWu
Feb. 27, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #19 on: April 05, 2014, 02:59:18 pm »
Purification Practice

Today is the Lantern Festival. It also falls in the Month of Miracles in the Tibetan calendar. Many Tibetan practitioners are performing virtuous deeds this month, such as nyungne fasting, circumambulation, prostration, releasing live beings, and so on. In Han Chinese, on the other hand, people are enjoying themselves setting off firecrackers, lighting lanterns and performing lion dances in festive ways.

However, some fools, in order to make their reunions with friends and relatives “more cheerful”, choose to entertain at the expense of other beings’ lives. Behind the facade of joyful celebration, many beings today are executed mercilessly. The cruel punishment inflicted upon them––shearing with knives, frying in oil, or cooking in boiling water––is the playing out of bloody purgatory right here in the human realm.

Like humans, animals feel pain when suffering;
Unlike humans, they can only weep silent tears.

Let us, then, do the purification practice for the woeful slaughtered beings as well as for the evil perpetrators!

In Collection of Good Deeds, Chagme Rinpoche imparts a simple pith instruction: “Visualize Vajrasattva at the crown of your head, and from him emanating numerous Vajrasattvas, each sitting on the top of other beings, either alive or dead. Recite the Hundred Syllable Mantra as many times as you can and visualize that the nectar, flowing down from Vajrasattva’s body, cleanses the obscuration of yourself and all others. Recite the mantra another 108 times, and then visualize that Vajrasattva dissolves into light and melts into yourself and all beings. Recognize emptiness while seeing that neither the support for purification nor the one who does the purification has any real existence. Remain unmoved in the state of emptiness momentarily. This is the way for confession in the context of both absolute and relative truths. By this practice, even incalculable downfalls in previous lives can be purified.”

This practice suits well for today’s occasion, however, it does not stop here. In everyday life, we should use it to purify the non-virtues of our family members and others. It is not only necessary, but also very convenient.

14th of January, Year of RenWu
February 26, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #20 on: April 06, 2014, 03:31:53 pm »
Reflecting Inward

Longchenpa, the embodiment of the Buddhas of three times, says in A Treatise on Finding Comfort and Ease in the Nature of the Mind:
In brief, one should first realize the luminosity of the mind’s nature and its changeless essence, and moreover, see all phenomena are mere provisional concepts and thus empty in nature. Then, by practicing on the path ardently, one can completely transform or purify the impure phenomena arising from the confused mind of false perceptions, thus approach the primordial state, and perfectly accomplish pure land as the mandala of ornament of the inexhaustible body, speech, and mind. This is the crux of all Dharma teachings.
This one instruction, in which the master has subsumed 84,000 teachings for future destined disciples; even the world’s best treasure cannot compare. How fortunate that we have now encountered it!

Turning the mind inward and remaining absorbed in this state constantly, the mind’s primordial luminosity will reveal itself. Otherwise, seized by dualistic grasping, one will become perverted and confused, “one produces two; two produces three; three produces all things.” Hauling on one’s shoulder life’s baggage—the toil for food and daily needs, love or hate, honor or disgrace, gain or loss, right or wrong, success or failure—is a sure way to make the gate of samsara’s throughway wide open.

The unconventional monk of the Tang Dynasty, Zen master Shi De, once said:

Not knowing the mind’s true nature, one seeks fame and wealth always.
Having gained fame and wealth, one appears careworn and haggard.
Not to mention those who failed in the game, wasted are their whole lives indeed.

Again the master, seeing that ordinary people are still oblivious to the Doctrines and labor painstakingly for minuscule gains, teaches:

Unmindful are worldly folks, immersed always in sensual pleasures.
Arising in my heart is compassion, when beholding these beings.
Worrying about their suffering, how can I not feel sad?

The master’s earnest compassion is palpable. But alas, as the saying goes,

Yearning for love, the flower on the bank sheds its petals,
Yet the heartless brook heeds not and babbles on.

No wonder the Zen master can only sigh deeply in vain!

May the master’s sincere guidance not dissipate into nothingness as time passes!

16th of January, Year of RenWu
February 28, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #21 on: April 07, 2014, 02:33:09 pm »
Life & Death

Life, in the music of composers, is the faint melody of flutes drifting from a remote tower; as penned by writers, it is a refreshing spring in the desert; as seen by sociologists, it is a charging train of desires…. Life, filled with poetic charm as it may be, remains unfathomable. Humans have made great strides in material civilization as time passes; yet life’s enigma, like the eternal riddle from Egypt’s ancient culture, remains an impassable chasm for most Westerners.

The Westerners’ comprehension of human consciousness remained a void until Evans-Wentz first translated The Tibetan Book of the Dead into English. This book, a classic of Tibetan Buddhism and now published in many languages, reveals the mystery of living and dying and has attracted great attention in the West. Tibetan Buddhism became well-known in the world and people started to ponder the topics of living and dying. But this kind of musing is different from that of the prince in Shakespeare’s Hamlet, who died a tragic death after mulling over life and death every day. Instead, people nowadays try to deal with the issue of how to face death, and institutions devoted to terminal care have thus come into existence.

In 1973 Ram Dass founded a hospice center to provide services for terminal cancer and AIDS patients. Caring for patients and trying to understand their pains, hospice staffs help patients to find hope in a hopeless situation. Ram Dass visited a dying patient named Bruce in San Francisco; he shared with him the teachings in The Tibetan Book of the Dead: “Escape not from the pains and confess your mistakes; learn to be calm and at peace. Slowly you will recognize the innate luminosity of your mind….” Guided by Ram Dass, Bruce’s twisted, agonized face gradually relaxed, and he made a tranquil and graceful exit.

What baffles Westerners most is that nearly every elderly Tibetan can be termed an expert in hospice care. They have been taught since a very young age how to squarely face death, and many practitioners have long followed the teachings of great masters. Their practices make them see death as a turning point, one that leaves the corporeal body behind and allows them to spring into liberation. As death approaches, Tibetan folks regard it as a transformative process of life, while Westerners feel completely lost and can only plead to medical doctors. Comparing these two attitudes, we must say the Tibetans are lucky.

The teaching on the secret of life and death is the most precious, we are forever grateful to Guru Rinpoche for leaving Tibetans such a rich spiritual legacy!

17th of January, Year of RenWu
March 1, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #22 on: April 08, 2014, 03:59:40 pm »
Being Fearful

As society progresses, we are privileged to enjoy tremendous material well being resulting from science and technology. But bad influence is part and parcel of modernization. Once getting jumbled in and staying on, the evil force becomes a putrid, fermenting thing giving off nauseating odors. It demolishes the peacefulness we once knew and delivers destructive blows to old traditions.

The Utopian life described as “no one pockets anything found on the road, nor is there a need to lock the door at night” has been reduced to a fairy tale these days. People are subject to horrific attacks at any time and any place. We fear brigands by day and burglars by night. Sitting at home, we are terrified; going out, we are scared. Security fences like birdcages are erected around the balconies of every household for protection, yet they have no power to mitigate people’s fearful mindsets.

After 9•11, many countries in the world have attempted various means of fatally cracking down on terrorist activities, but their outcomes are anything but effective.

A bestseller in the United States, the book Profile of a Terrorist Network revealed that the American government, for the sake of peace keeping and saving innocent lives, had offered a reward of $25 million for tips regarding Osama Bin Laden’s whereabouts. The offer also promised total privacy for the tipster as well as relocation assistance, etc. Regardless of the rich reward, no progress has come about so far.

In A Guide to the Bodhisattva Way of Life, it says:

Wicked beings are as unending as space; they cannot possibly all be subdued.
But when the mental attitude of anger is slain, slain is every enemy.

Trying to conquer all the enemies in the world without first overcoming one’s own mind is nothing but wishful thinking!

In one of his past lives, Buddha Shakyamuni was reborn as a Brahmin. During one of his gatherings with a snake, a pigeon, a crow, and a beast, the beast said: “Horror is the worst suffering.” The crow said: “Hunger is the worst suffering.” The snake said: “Hatred is the worst suffering.” The pigeon said: “Avarice is the worst suffering.” The Brahmin then taught them how to eradicate these four worst sufferings: “The root cause of suffering is ignorance. To be free from suffering, one must uphold the five precepts.” The snake, pigeon, crow, and beast all followed the instruction and were reborn as humans; they eventually attained liberation through practice.

In fact, the dwellings of spiritual seekers through the ages, whether set in rocky caves or by mountain streams, were all auspicious locations devoid of terror and fear. The Zen master Shiwu Qing-gong of the Yuan Dynasty retreated to a place where no human had ever set foot for miles around. He practiced unremittingly in three stone huts located near rocky boulders; his twig door was never locked, as there was no one else around. He wrote:

Fallen yellow leaves float away freely in the stream,
White fluffy clouds sail toward the mountains.
The plain hut of three stone caves by the cliff is my dwelling,
Its twig double door is always left open all day long.

How easygoing and carefree was his mind, I am totally envious!

18th of January, Year of RenWu
March 2, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #23 on: April 09, 2014, 01:20:53 pm »
Knowing Not

Oh no, the bothersome backache is here again.

Sickness is anything but merciful. Regardless of the weather—warm or chilly, cloudy or cloudless—it pounces on me and renders me in no mood to enjoy the spring splendor beyond the window.

One becomes most susceptible to the thought of death in illness.

Perhaps I’ll die today! Who knows if I’ll be able to finish the translation of Great Biography of Buddha Shakyamuni? Will A Treatise on Finding Comfort and Ease in the Nature of Mind end as well as it began? As I have not been mindful about death, I have wasted a huge portion of my life. Now that old age is creeping in, I can’t help feeling my days are numbered, just like the sun setting beyond the western hills. In the little time left, I should always maintain the right view, be diligent and unfettered by worldly affairs.

To encourage myself, I am citing here the verse on realization by Hong Zhi of the Southern Song Dynasty:

Dharma bliss is my sustenance, compassion is my dwelling,
Faith in the Buddha is my final settling place; this body of mine is merely on loan.
Being mindful is my sole endeavor; I have no time to spare on earthly affairs.

Take Dharma bliss as sustenance; regard love and compassion as dwelling places. Take faith in Buddhism as the final destiny; understand that the body is on loan. Always diligently maintain the right view; spare no time in chasing the mundane affairs. Keep off fame and wealth; crave not external attractions. Always see life as a candle flickering in the wind.

Can I accomplish all of this?

It is tough!

20th of January, Year of RenWu
March 3, 200

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #24 on: April 10, 2014, 02:36:56 pm »
Hit Me

In order to bring about their disciples’ sudden revelations, great masters throughout history at times employed some peculiar training methods besides using gentle words.

Naropa, when following Tilopa, underwent 12 major and 12 minor hardships. Finally, one day Tilopa grabbed Naropa’s throat with his left hand and with his right hand he took off his sandal and hit his disciple on the forehead with it. Naropa lost consciousness. When he came to, all the qualities of his teacher had arisen in him. The teacher’s wisdom and the disciple’s mind had become one in realization.

Zen master Liao Yi of the Song Dynasty at 17 paid a formal visit to Master Gao Feng and was given the pith instruction of meditating on “all phenomena converged to be one”. One day when seeing snowflakes fallen from pine branches, Liao Yi was inspired to write a poem which he submitted to his teacher. Giving no chance for explanation, the master lifted a wooden stick and hit the student down into a deep ravine. With painful wounds all over his body, Liao Yi reflected on the nature of the mind and finally reached the stage that is beyond all fixation and conception. He left these beautiful lines:

Gone swiftly is all the snow covering the vast land, once the sun appears.
My doubt in Buddhas and the fixation on east, south, west, or north, likewise, are now all vanished.

When Zen master Huang Bo took Lin Ji as his disciple, he hit him 61 times with sticks and made him the most outstanding Zen master in generations. There is a saying about Zen schools: “Lin Ji is like a war general, while Cao Dong is like a field farmer.” It’s obvious that Lin Ji, while carrying on the lineage tradition, also has developed his own unique Zen style that even surpasses his teacher’s.

When, if ever, will my Guru give me a hit on the head?

21st of January, Year of RenWu
March 4, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #25 on: April 11, 2014, 01:24:10 pm »
What a beautiful morning!

Outside the window, the whole sky was filled with the sunrise’s glow, as rosy as if it were ablaze. Houses, trees, lawns, roadways…. all were tinted with a reddish hue. I drenched myself merrily in this glory as if spellbound. Gong Que Sen Que! (Offering to the Three Jewels!)

Flipping through books, I chanced upon this passage that Rigdzin Jigme Lingpa, the great Tibetan siddha and a terton master, says to his disciple Padma Sangdon:
When one embraces Buddhism and embarks on genuine practice, it’s not uncommon for morbid obstructions to surface. One then should stay away from evil friends and be vigilant. Do not drift with the tide. When dealing with people, be sure to uphold your principles and self-reliance, and make your own decisions. Any speech, even words of truth, feeds avarice and aversion, therefore maintain the code of silence firmly, and regard worldly people as strangers. Know what to adopt and what to avoid according to karmic principles, cultivate bodhichitta. Whether traveling to the city or in the mountains, always watch your mind. In happiness or sorrow, always cast off discursive thoughts and observe mind’s primal state. Maintain the recognition that appearances are illusory and dreamlike. Look into your mind’s essence that is without birth or death. In post-meditation, dedicate all the merits to enlightenment. These are the most profound teachings from me.

Master Repa Shiwa Ö also says:

Practicing alone, one attains realization; two together, good connections are made; having more than three or four, causes for avarice and aversion arise. Therefore, I would rather practice alone and abide in tranquility.

Quiet and solitary mountainsides are the places where Buddhas and Bodhisattvas found peacefulness. There is nothing to make you busy, no distractions; all qualities that increase merit or lead to liberation—renunciation, bodhichitta, faith, and so on—will arise effortlessly. As a result, your whole way of life becomes wholesome spontaneously.

Why hesitate? Go quickly to a secluded forest and practice in solitude!

22nd of January, Year of RenWu
March 5, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #26 on: April 12, 2014, 02:53:50 pm »
Auspicious Dream

When I woke up, the clock had just struck six.

I had a good dream last night. As an ordinary person, I couldn’t help feeling overjoyed, even knowing that all dreams are but illusory. I wavered on whether to write down the dream. In the end, to do so got the upper hand.

This is the third time that I dreamed of Mipham Rinpoche since I left Chengdu.

The first dream happened when I was in the hospital. In it, I received a transmission to teach the Commentaries on Distinguishing Dharma and Dharmata. The second time, which was also during my hospitalization, I was given the transmission of Distinguishing the Middle and the Extremes and the Gateway to Knowledge. Upon waking up, I was so proud of myself and could barely hold back my strong urge to immediately translate or teach others the transmissions that I had just received.

Last night, Mipham Rinpoche appeared as three different persons in turn. When the last one came, I clearly sensed that the emanation must be Mipham Rinpoche. He looked like a Kham layman in his 40s, with hair gleaming black and eyes brimming with vigor. He had thick dark eyebrows and snow-white teeth; his tanned face had a rosy tint. Wearing blue Tibetan brocade, he pleasantly settled to the left side of my bed. A deep sense of reverence arose in my heart and I felt that he is the wisdom embodiment of all the Buddhas and Bodhisattvas. He seemed amicable, and I sought his advice on the questions I always had…. When I woke up, I could still feel the warmth of his body, and I dared not touch the place where he had been moments ago.

Some people disapprove of talking about dreams. Rigdzin Jigme Lingpa once said: “A good dream, after being disclosed, will never come back again.” Our revered H.H. Jigme Phuntsok Rinpoche also taught: “A tiger can leap quite far, but a frog just cannot follow suit.” It seems that talking about one’s dreams is not a good idea. Anyway, now I have said it, and that’s it.

Yet what puzzles me still is that I have prayed most earnestly to the Omniscient Longchen Rabjam for many years, yet he has never appeared in any of my dreams. Why? I have no answer!

Here, I am only describing a good dream that came to me just once in a blue moon. Should I recount all my bad dreams, they would be nothing but long filthy foot wraps.

At dawn, 23th of January, Year of RenWu

March 6, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #27 on: April 13, 2014, 02:20:25 pm »
Tight-Lipped

As spiritual practitioners, we should always check up on our own faults and keep silent all the time. The mouth is to be used in meaningful activities such as recitation or extolling virtues; otherwise it may cause grave harm to future lives.

Master Padmasambhava, when departing Tibet, taught his disciples:
Loquacious people easily betray their thoughts to others. Their jokes sometimes are interpreted as the real thing while true statements are misunderstood as jokes, making even simple tasks difficult to accomplish. Thus all disciples had better keep their mouths shut and say very few words.

Great Tibetan masters often cite this instruction to caution students, lest they commit verbal non-virtues.

The great practitioner Geshe LeSogpa says:

People nowadays like to chase after high teachings; they spend days on end requesting this or that instruction. Yet rarely do they put the requested teachings into actual practice, nor do they care about accomplishing them. Bragging that they are disciples of the Three Jewels, they always babble, ‘I am a follower of the Three Jewels,’ yet they slander their teachers or Sangha members behind them. I always think the mouth can really drag us to the hell realm. If people were to listen to me, they should lock up their mouths and hand the keys to others. The mouth would stay locked all the time, opening only for the necessity of eating. How wonderful if this would actually happen!

Zen master Shimen Huikai called himself “the silent old fellow.” He wrote this poem:

Been there, done that, I am now too lazy to talk.
Seen it, known all, I care only to nod to people.
Declare not that this old guy knows nothing,
Charming and unconventional is everything but him.

It’s clear between the lines that this Zen master has seen it all in this world; he is unconventional, carefree, and unfettered. Being broad-minded, he is unaffected by others’ praise or insult, nor does he care to discuss others’ personal affairs.

Other adages also say: “Silence is golden,” and “Full of water, a jar makes no sound; half full of water, lots of clattering noise.” It is obvious, then, how important it is to be tight-lipped!

24th of January, Year of RenWu
March 7, 2002

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #28 on: April 13, 2014, 04:35:02 pm »
Yes, silence is golden, but silence can also cause grave harm in this life --- although I've come to value your little gems of wisdom, this particular one speaks for itself.

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Re: World Youth Buddhist Society Annual Conference 2014
« Reply #29 on: April 14, 2014, 01:47:26 pm »
Yes, silence is golden, but silence can also cause grave harm in this life --- although I've come to value your little gems of wisdom, this particular one speaks for itself.

thanks for your insightful sharing   :namaste:
« Last Edit: April 14, 2014, 01:49:55 pm by UK Bodhi Association »

 


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